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6.632 Electromagnetic Wave Theory (MIT) 6.632 Electromagnetic Wave Theory (MIT)

Description

6.632 is a graduate subject on electromagnetic wave theory, emphasizing mathematical approaches, problem solving, and physical interpretation. Topics covered include: waves in media, equivalence principle, duality and complementarity, Huygens' principle, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, dyadic Green's functions, Lorentz transformation, and Maxwell-Minkowski theory. Examples deal with limiting cases of Maxwell's theory and diffraction and scattering of electromagnetic waves. 6.632 is a graduate subject on electromagnetic wave theory, emphasizing mathematical approaches, problem solving, and physical interpretation. Topics covered include: waves in media, equivalence principle, duality and complementarity, Huygens' principle, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, dyadic Green's functions, Lorentz transformation, and Maxwell-Minkowski theory. Examples deal with limiting cases of Maxwell's theory and diffraction and scattering of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetic wave theory | electromagnetic wave theory | waves in media | waves in media | equivalence principle | equivalence principle | duality | duality | complementarity | complementarity | Huygens' principle | Huygens' principle | Fresnel diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | dyadic Green's functions | dyadic Green's functions | Lorentz transformation | Lorentz transformation | Maxwell-Minkowski theory | Maxwell-Minkowski theory | Maxwell | Maxwell | diffraction | diffraction | scattering | scattering

License

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT) 6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 explores modern optics through lectures, laboratory exercises, and projects. Topics covered include: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, coherent optical processors, holography, optical properties of materials, lasers, nonlinear optics, electro-optic and acousto-optic materials and devices, optical detectors, fiber optics, and optical communication. This course is worth 12 Engineering Design Points. 6.161 explores modern optics through lectures, laboratory exercises, and projects. Topics covered include: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, coherent optical processors, holography, optical properties of materials, lasers, nonlinear optics, electro-optic and acousto-optic materials and devices, optical detectors, fiber optics, and optical communication. This course is worth 12 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics lab | modern optics | modern optics | laboratory | laboratory | polarization | polarization | light | light | reflection | reflection | refraction | refraction | coherence | coherence | interference | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | imaging | transforming | transforming | lenses | lenses | spatial filtering | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | coherent optical processors | holography | holography | optical properties of materials | optical properties of materials | lasers | lasers | nonlinear optics | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | electro-optic | acousto-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | optical detectors | fiber optics | fiber optics | optical communication | optical communication

License

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT) 6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 offers an introduction to laboratory optics, optical principles, and optical devices and systems. This course covers a wide range of topics, including: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, holography, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, two-lens coherent optical processor, optical properties of materials, lasers, electro-optic, acousto-optic and liquid-crystal light modulators, optical detectors, optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. There are 12 engineering design points associated with this subject. 6.161 offers an introduction to laboratory optics, optical principles, and optical devices and systems. This course covers a wide range of topics, including: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, holography, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, two-lens coherent optical processor, optical properties of materials, lasers, electro-optic, acousto-optic and liquid-crystal light modulators, optical detectors, optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. There are 12 engineering design points associated with this subject.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics lab | modern optics | modern optics | laboratory | laboratory | polarization | polarization | light | light | reflection | reflection | refraction | refraction | coherence | coherence | interference | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | imaging | transforming | transforming | lenses | lenses | spatial filtering | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | coherent optical processors | holography | holography | optical properties of materials | optical properties of materials | lasers | lasers | nonlinear optics | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | electro-optic | acousto-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | optical detectors | fiber optics | fiber optics | optical communication | optical communication

License

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6.632 Electromagnetic Wave Theory (MIT)

Description

6.632 is a graduate subject on electromagnetic wave theory, emphasizing mathematical approaches, problem solving, and physical interpretation. Topics covered include: waves in media, equivalence principle, duality and complementarity, Huygens' principle, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, dyadic Green's functions, Lorentz transformation, and Maxwell-Minkowski theory. Examples deal with limiting cases of Maxwell's theory and diffraction and scattering of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetic wave theory | waves in media | equivalence principle | duality | complementarity | Huygens' principle | Fresnel diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | dyadic Green's functions | Lorentz transformation | Maxwell-Minkowski theory | Maxwell | diffraction | scattering

License

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6.632 Electromagnetic Wave Theory (MIT)

Description

6.632 is a graduate subject on electromagnetic wave theory, emphasizing mathematical approaches, problem solving, and physical interpretation. Topics covered include: waves in media, equivalence principle, duality and complementarity, Huygens' principle, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, dyadic Green's functions, Lorentz transformation, and Maxwell-Minkowski theory. Examples deal with limiting cases of Maxwell's theory and diffraction and scattering of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetic wave theory | waves in media | equivalence principle | duality | complementarity | Huygens' principle | Fresnel diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | dyadic Green's functions | Lorentz transformation | Maxwell-Minkowski theory | Maxwell | diffraction | scattering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers. This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

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8.04 Quantum Physics I (MIT) 8.04 Quantum Physics I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers the experimental basis of quantum physics. It introduces wave mechanics, Schrödinger's equation in a single dimension, and Schrödinger's equation in three dimensions.It is the first course in the undergraduate Quantum Physics sequence, followed by 8.05 Quantum Physics II and 8.06 Quantum Physics III.  Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course covers the experimental basis of quantum physics. It introduces wave mechanics, Schrödinger's equation in a single dimension, and Schrödinger's equation in three dimensions.It is the first course in the undergraduate Quantum Physics sequence, followed by 8.05 Quantum Physics II and 8.06 Quantum Physics III. 

Subjects

quantum physics: photoelectric effect | quantum physics: photoelectric effect | Compton scattering | Compton scattering | photons | photons | Franck-Hertz experiment | Franck-Hertz experiment | the Bohr atom | the Bohr atom | electron diffraction | electron diffraction | deBroglie waves | deBroglie waves | wave-particle duality of matter and light | wave-particle duality of matter and light | wave mechanics: Schroedinger's equation | wave mechanics: Schroedinger's equation | wave functions | wave functions | wave packets | wave packets | probability amplitudes | probability amplitudes | stationary states | stationary states | the Heisenberg uncertainty principle | the Heisenberg uncertainty principle | zero-point energies | zero-point energies | transmission and reflection at a barrier | transmission and reflection at a barrier | barrier penetration | barrier penetration | potential wells | potential wells | simple harmonic oscillator | simple harmonic oscillator | Schroedinger's equation in three dimensions: central potentials | and introduction to hydrogenic systems | Schroedinger's equation in three dimensions: central potentials | and introduction to hydrogenic systems

License

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2.717J Optical Engineering (MIT) 2.717J Optical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course concerns the theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design, with an emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. It provides the engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included. This course concerns the theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design, with an emphasis on diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. It provides the engineering methodology skills necessary to incorporate optical components in systems serving diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio-imaging, and computing (sensors, data storage, communication in multi-processor systems). Experimental demonstrations and a design project are included.

Subjects

optical methods in engineering and system design | optical methods in engineering and system design | diffraction | statistical optics | holography | and imaging | diffraction | statistical optics | holography | and imaging | Statistical Optics | Inverse Problems (i.e. theory of imaging) | Statistical Optics | Inverse Problems (i.e. theory of imaging) | applications in precision engineering and metrology | bio-imaging | and computing (sensors | data storage | communication in multi-processor systems) | applications in precision engineering and metrology | bio-imaging | and computing (sensors | data storage | communication in multi-processor systems) | Fourier optics | Fourier optics | probability | probability | stochastic processes | stochastic processes | light statistics | light statistics | theory of light coherence | theory of light coherence | van Cittert-Zernicke Theorem | van Cittert-Zernicke Theorem | statistical optics applications | statistical optics applications | inverse problems | inverse problems | information-theoretic views | information-theoretic views | information theory | information theory | 2.717 | 2.717 | MAS.857 | MAS.857

License

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6.161 Modern Optics Project Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.161 offers an introduction to laboratory optics, optical principles, and optical devices and systems. This course covers a wide range of topics, including: polarization properties of light, reflection and refraction, coherence and interference, Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction, holography, imaging and transforming properties of lenses, spatial filtering, two-lens coherent optical processor, optical properties of materials, lasers, electro-optic, acousto-optic and liquid-crystal light modulators, optical detectors, optical waveguides and fiber-optic communication systems. Students engage in extensive oral and written communication exercises. There are 12 engineering design points associated with this subject.

Subjects

modern optics lab | modern optics | laboratory | polarization | light | reflection | refraction | coherence | interference | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fresnel diffraction | imaging | transforming | lenses | spatial filtering | coherent optical processors | holography | optical properties of materials | lasers | nonlinear optics | electro-optic | acousto-optic | optical detectors | fiber optics | optical communication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT) 3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electron | electronic properties | electronic properties | magnetism | magnetism | magentic properties | magentic properties | structure | structure | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | phonon | quantum | quantum | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | radiation | radiation | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | polymer | polymer | glass | glass | corrosion | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.231 Physics of Solids I (MIT) 8.231 Physics of Solids I (MIT)

Description

The topics covered in this course include:Periodic Structure and Symmetry of CrystalsDiffraction, Reciprocal LatticeChemical BondingLattice DynamicsPhononsThermal PropertiesFree Electron GasModel of MetalsBloch Theorem and Band StructureNearly Free Electron ApproximationTight Binding MethodFermi SurfaceSemiconductorsElectronsHolesImpuritiesOptical PropertiesExcitons andMagnetism The topics covered in this course include:Periodic Structure and Symmetry of CrystalsDiffraction, Reciprocal LatticeChemical BondingLattice DynamicsPhononsThermal PropertiesFree Electron GasModel of MetalsBloch Theorem and Band StructureNearly Free Electron ApproximationTight Binding MethodFermi SurfaceSemiconductorsElectronsHolesImpuritiesOptical PropertiesExcitons andMagnetism

Subjects

periodic structure and symmetry of crystals | periodic structure and symmetry of crystals | diffraction | diffraction | reciprocal lattice | reciprocal lattice | chemical bonding | chemical bonding | phonons | phonons | thermal properties | thermal properties | free electron gas | free electron gas | model of metals | model of metals | Bloch theorem and band structure | Bloch theorem and band structure | nearly free electron approximation | nearly free electron approximation | tight binding method | tight binding method | Fermi surface | Fermi surface | semiconductors | semiconductors | electrons | electrons | holes | holes | impurities | impurities | optical properties | optical properties | excitons | excitons | magnetism | magnetism

License

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8.231 Physics of Solids I (MIT) 8.231 Physics of Solids I (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the basic concepts of the quantum theory of solids. This course offers an introduction to the basic concepts of the quantum theory of solids.

Subjects

periodic structure | periodic structure | symmetry of crystals | symmetry of crystals | diffraction | diffraction | reciprocal lattice | reciprocal lattice | chemical bonding | chemical bonding | lattice dynamics | lattice dynamics | phonons | phonons | thermal properties | thermal properties | free electron gas | free electron gas | model of metals | model of metals | Bloch theorem | Bloch theorem | band structure | band structure | nearly free electron approximation | nearly free electron approximation | tight binding method | tight binding method | Fermi surface | Fermi surface | semiconductors | semiconductors | electrons | electrons | holes | holes | impurities | impurities | optical properties | optical properties | excitons | excitons | magnetism. | magnetism.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.309 Biological Engineering II: Instrumentation and Measurement (MIT) 20.309 Biological Engineering II: Instrumentation and Measurement (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course covers sensing and measurement for quantitative molecular/cell/tissue analysis, in terms of genetic, biochemical, and biophysical properties. Methods include light and fluorescence microscopies; electro-mechanical probes such as atomic force microscopy, laser and magnetic traps, and MEMS devices; and the application of statistics, probability and noise analysis to experimental data. Enrollment preference is given to juniors and seniors. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course covers sensing and measurement for quantitative molecular/cell/tissue analysis, in terms of genetic, biochemical, and biophysical properties. Methods include light and fluorescence microscopies; electro-mechanical probes such as atomic force microscopy, laser and magnetic traps, and MEMS devices; and the application of statistics, probability and noise analysis to experimental data. Enrollment preference is given to juniors and seniors.

Subjects

DNA analysis | DNA analysis | Fourier analysis | Fourier analysis | FFT | FFT | DNA melting | DNA melting | electronics | electronics | microscopy | microscopy | microscope | microscope | probes | probes | biology | biology | atomic force microscope | atomic force microscope | AFM | AFM | scanning probe microscope | scanning probe microscope | image processing | image processing | MATLAB | MATLAB | convolution | convolution | optoelectronics | optoelectronics | rheology | rheology | fluorescence | fluorescence | noise | noise | detector | detector | optics | optics | diffraction | diffraction | optical trap | optical trap | 3D | 3D | 3-D | 3-D | three-dimensional imaging | three-dimensional imaging | visualization | visualization

License

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5.069 Crystal Structure Analysis (MIT) 5.069 Crystal Structure Analysis (MIT)

Description

This course covers the following topics: X-ray diffraction: symmetry, space groups, geometry of diffraction, structure factors, phase problem, direct methods, Patterson methods, electron density maps, structure refinement, how to grow good crystals, powder methods, limits of X-ray diffraction methods, and structure data bases. This course covers the following topics: X-ray diffraction: symmetry, space groups, geometry of diffraction, structure factors, phase problem, direct methods, Patterson methods, electron density maps, structure refinement, how to grow good crystals, powder methods, limits of X-ray diffraction methods, and structure data bases.

Subjects

crystallography | crystallography | inorganic chemistry | inorganic chemistry | physical methods | physical methods | crystal structure determination | crystal structure determination | 3D structure | 3D structure | x-ray crystallagraphy | x-ray crystallagraphy | diffraction | diffraction | x-rays | x-rays | symmetry | symmetry | phasing | phasing | crystal structure | crystal structure | symmetry operations | symmetry operations | crystal lattice | crystal lattice | structure refinement | structure refinement | electron density maps | electron density maps | space group determination | space group determination | anomalous scattering | anomalous scattering

License

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Electron diffraction

Description

This is a third edition of the Electron Microscopy and Analysis textbook, which was published by Taylor and Francis Books UK in 2001 (ISBN 0748409688). It deals with several sophisticated techniques for magnifying images of very small objects by large amounts - especially in a physical science context. Consisting of seven chapters, presented as separate files the resource incorporates questions and answers in each chapter for ease of learning. Equally as relevant for material scientists and bioscientists, this resource is an essential textbook and laboratory manual. The chapter explains the diffraction of electrons and demonstrates what it can reveal.

Subjects

electron microscopy | book | analysis | bragg law | structure factor | spot patterns | d spacing | reciprocal lattice | ewald sphere | kikuchi pattern | convergent beam diffraction | diffraction | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT) 3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electron | electronic properties | electronic properties | magnetism | magnetism | magentic properties | magentic properties | structure | structure | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | phonon | quantum | quantum | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | radiation | radiation | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | polymer | polymer | glass | glass | corrosion | corrosion

License

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18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005. Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.03 Physics III (MIT) 8.03 Physics III (MIT)

Description

Mechanical vibrations and waves, simple harmonic motion, superposition, forced vibrations and resonance, coupled oscillations and normal modes, vibrations of continuous systems, reflection and refraction, phase and group velocity. Optics, wave solutions to Maxwell's equations, polarization, Snell's law, interference, Huygens's principle, Fraunhofer diffraction, and gratings. Mechanical vibrations and waves, simple harmonic motion, superposition, forced vibrations and resonance, coupled oscillations and normal modes, vibrations of continuous systems, reflection and refraction, phase and group velocity. Optics, wave solutions to Maxwell's equations, polarization, Snell's law, interference, Huygens's principle, Fraunhofer diffraction, and gratings.

Subjects

Mechanical vibrations and waves | Mechanical vibrations and waves | simple harmonic motion | simple harmonic motion | superposition | superposition | forced vibrations and resonance | forced vibrations and resonance | coupled oscillations and normal modes | coupled oscillations and normal modes | vibrations of continuous systems | vibrations of continuous systems | reflection and refraction | reflection and refraction | phase and group velocity | phase and group velocity | wave solutions to Maxwell's equations | wave solutions to Maxwell's equations | polarization | polarization | Snell's Law | Snell's Law | interference | interference | Huygens's principle | Huygens's principle | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | gratings | gratings

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5.069 Crystal Structure Analysis (MIT) 5.069 Crystal Structure Analysis (MIT)

Description

This course covers the following topics: X-ray diffraction: symmetry, space groups, geometry of diffraction, structure factors, phase problem, direct methods, Patterson methods, electron density maps, structure refinement, how to grow good crystals, powder methods, limits of X-ray diffraction methods, and structure data bases. This course covers the following topics: X-ray diffraction: symmetry, space groups, geometry of diffraction, structure factors, phase problem, direct methods, Patterson methods, electron density maps, structure refinement, how to grow good crystals, powder methods, limits of X-ray diffraction methods, and structure data bases.

Subjects

crystallography | crystallography | inorganic chemistry | inorganic chemistry | physical methods | physical methods | crystal structure determination | crystal structure determination | 3D structure | 3D structure | x-ray crystallagraphy | x-ray crystallagraphy | diffraction | diffraction | x-rays | x-rays | symmetry | symmetry | phasing | phasing | crystal structure | crystal structure | symmetry operations | symmetry operations | crystal lattice | crystal lattice | structure refinement | structure refinement | electron density maps | electron density maps | space group determination | space group determination | anomalous scattering | anomalous scattering

License

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6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT) 6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.Acknowledgments The instructors would like to thank Robert Haussman for transcribing into LaTeX the problem set and Quiz 2 solutions. This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.Acknowledgments The instructors would like to thank Robert Haussman for transcribing into LaTeX the problem set and Quiz 2 solutions.

Subjects

ESD.013 | ESD.013 | electromagnetics | electromagnetics | applications | applications | wireless communications | wireless communications | circuits | circuits | computer interconnects | computer interconnects | peripherals | peripherals | optical fiber links | optical fiber links | microwave communications | microwave communications | radar | radar | antennas | antennas | sensors | sensors | micro-electromechanical systems | micro-electromechanical systems | power generation | power generation | power transmission | power transmission | quasistatic solutions | quasistatic solutions | dynamic solutions | dynamic solutions | Maxwell | Maxwell | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | waves | waves | radiation | radiation | diffraction | diffraction | guided waves | guided waves | unguided waves | unguided waves | resonance | resonance | forces | forces | power | power | energy | energy

License

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8.04 Quantum Physics I (MIT) 8.04 Quantum Physics I (MIT)

Description

Experimental basis of Quantum Physics: photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, photons, Franck-Hertz experiment, the Bohr atom, electron diffraction, De Broglie waves, and wave-particle duality of matter and light. Introduction to wave mechanics: Schroedinger's equation, wave functions, wave packets, probability amplitudes, stationary states, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, and zero-point energies. Solutions to Schroedinger's equation in one dimension: transmission and reflection at a barrier, barrier penetration, potential wells, the simple harmonic oscillator. Schroedinger's equation in three dimensions: central potentials, and introduction to hydrogenic systems. Experimental basis of Quantum Physics: photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, photons, Franck-Hertz experiment, the Bohr atom, electron diffraction, De Broglie waves, and wave-particle duality of matter and light. Introduction to wave mechanics: Schroedinger's equation, wave functions, wave packets, probability amplitudes, stationary states, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, and zero-point energies. Solutions to Schroedinger's equation in one dimension: transmission and reflection at a barrier, barrier penetration, potential wells, the simple harmonic oscillator. Schroedinger's equation in three dimensions: central potentials, and introduction to hydrogenic systems.

Subjects

quantum physics: photoelectric effect | quantum physics: photoelectric effect | Compton scattering | Compton scattering | photons | photons | Franck-Hertz experiment | Franck-Hertz experiment | the Bohr atom | the Bohr atom | electron diffraction | electron diffraction | deBroglie waves | deBroglie waves | wave-particle duality of matter and light | wave-particle duality of matter and light | wave mechanics: Schroedinger's equation | wave mechanics: Schroedinger's equation | wave functions | wave functions | wave packets | wave packets | probability amplitudes | probability amplitudes | stationary states | stationary states | the Heisenberg uncertainty principle | the Heisenberg uncertainty principle | zero-point energies | zero-point energies | transmission and reflection at a barrier | transmission and reflection at a barrier | barrier penetration | barrier penetration | potential wells | potential wells | simple harmonic oscillator | simple harmonic oscillator | Schroedinger's equation in three dimensions: central potentials | Schroedinger's equation in three dimensions: central potentials | introduction to hydrogenic systems | introduction to hydrogenic systems | De Broglie waves | De Broglie waves

License

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. This course provides an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered in geometrical optics include: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Topics covered in wave optics include: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Analytical and numerical tools used in optical design are emphasized. Graduate students are required to complete assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optics | optics | optical science | optical science | geometrical optics | geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design | lens design | apertures | apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Fraunhofer diffraction | Fraunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

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6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT) 6.013 Electromagnetics and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.The instructors of this course extend a general acknowledgment to the many students and instructors who have made major contributions to the 6.013 course materials over the years, and apologize for any residual errors that may remain in these writ This course explores electromagnetic phenomena in modern applications, including wireless communications, circuits, computer interconnects and peripherals, optical fiber links and components, microwave communications and radar, antennas, sensors, micro-electromechanical systems, motors, and power generation and transmission. Fundamentals covered include: quasistatic and dynamic solutions to Maxwell's equations; waves, radiation, and diffraction; coupling to media and structures; guided and unguided waves; resonance; and forces, power, and energy.The instructors of this course extend a general acknowledgment to the many students and instructors who have made major contributions to the 6.013 course materials over the years, and apologize for any residual errors that may remain in these writ

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | applications | applications | wireless communications | wireless communications | circuits | circuits | computer interconnects | computer interconnects | peripherals | peripherals | optical fiber links | optical fiber links | microwave | microwave | communications | communications | radar | radar | antennas | antennas | sensors | sensors | micro-electromechanical systems | micro-electromechanical systems | power generation | power generation | power transmission | power transmission | quasistatic solutions | quasistatic solutions | dynamic solutions | dynamic solutions | Maxwell | Maxwell | Maxwell's equations | Maxwell's equations | waves | waves | radiation | radiation | diffraction | diffraction | guided waves | guided waves | unguided waves | unguided waves | resonance | resonance | forces | forces | power | power | energy | energy | microwave communications | microwave communications

License

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

Introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Emphasis on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. Introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry. Wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, space-bandwidth product. Emphasis on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

ray-tracing | ray-tracing | lens design | lens design | apertures and stops | apertures and stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | basic electrodynamics | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction | Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product

License

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2.71 Optics (MIT) 2.71 Optics (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered include geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry; wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, and space-bandwidth product. Emphasis is on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project. This course is an introduction to optical science with elementary engineering applications. Topics covered include geometrical optics: ray-tracing, aberrations, lens design, apertures and stops, radiometry and photometry; wave optics: basic electrodynamics, polarization, interference, wave-guiding, Fresnel and Faunhofer diffraction, image formation, resolution, and space-bandwidth product. Emphasis is on analytical and numerical tools used in optical design. Graduate students are required to complete additional assignments with stronger analytical content, and an advanced design project.

Subjects

optical science | optical science | elementary engineering applications | elementary engineering applications | Geometrical optics | Geometrical optics | ray-tracing | ray-tracing | aberrations | aberrations | lens design; apertures | lens design; apertures | stops | stops | radiometry | radiometry | photometry | photometry | Wave optics | Wave optics | basic electrodynamics | basic electrodynamics | polarization | polarization | interference | interference | wave-guiding | wave-guiding | Fresnel | Fresnel | Faunhofer diffraction | Faunhofer diffraction | image formation | image formation | resolution | resolution | space-bandwidth product | space-bandwidth product | optical design | optical design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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