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6.892 Computational Models of Discourse (MIT) 6.892 Computational Models of Discourse (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate level introduction to automatic discourse processing. The emphasis will be on methods and models that have applicability to natural language and speech processing. The class will cover the following topics: discourse structure, models of coherence and cohesion, plan recognition algorithms, and text segmentation. We will study symbolic as well as machine learning methods for discourse analysis. We will also discuss the use of these methods in a variety of applications ranging from dialogue systems to automatic essay writing. This subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject. This course is a graduate level introduction to automatic discourse processing. The emphasis will be on methods and models that have applicability to natural language and speech processing. The class will cover the following topics: discourse structure, models of coherence and cohesion, plan recognition algorithms, and text segmentation. We will study symbolic as well as machine learning methods for discourse analysis. We will also discuss the use of these methods in a variety of applications ranging from dialogue systems to automatic essay writing. This subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

automatic discourse processing | automatic discourse processing | natural language | natural language | speech processing | speech processing | discourse structure | discourse structure | models of coherence and cohesion | models of coherence and cohesion | plan recognition algorithms | plan recognition algorithms | text segmentation | text segmentation | symbolic learning | symbolic learning | machine learning | machine learning | discourse analysis | discourse analysis | dialogue systems | dialogue systems | automatic essay writing | automatic essay writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT) 11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT)

Description

This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial? This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial?

Subjects

how society should respond to poverty | how society should respond to poverty | race | race | politics of welfare | politics of welfare | out-of-wedlock births | out-of-wedlock births | homelessness | homelessness | crime | crime | drugs | drugs | knowledge about poverty and community | knowledge about poverty and community | empowerment from social science research | empowerment from social science research | public discourse and politics | public discourse and politics | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | social controversy | social controversy | 1990s | 1990s | poverty | poverty | welfare | welfare | extra-marital births | extra-marital births | values | values | politics | politics | public policy | public policy | social science research | social science research | public discourse | public discourse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.892 Computational Models of Discourse (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate level introduction to automatic discourse processing. The emphasis will be on methods and models that have applicability to natural language and speech processing. The class will cover the following topics: discourse structure, models of coherence and cohesion, plan recognition algorithms, and text segmentation. We will study symbolic as well as machine learning methods for discourse analysis. We will also discuss the use of these methods in a variety of applications ranging from dialogue systems to automatic essay writing. This subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.

Subjects

automatic discourse processing | natural language | speech processing | discourse structure | models of coherence and cohesion | plan recognition algorithms | text segmentation | symbolic learning | machine learning | discourse analysis | dialogue systems | automatic essay writing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT) 21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT)

Description

Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan. Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan.

Subjects

World Trade Center | World Trade Center | September 11 | September 11 | memorial | memorial | discourse | discourse | media | media | art | art | collective memory | collective memory | Germany | Germany | Japan | Japan | global commerce | global commerce | transportation | transportation | systems | systems | surveillance | surveillance | non-Western cultures | non-Western cultures | oppositional political formations | oppositional political formations | Robert Musil | Robert Musil | Maurice Halbwachs | Maurice Halbwachs | Shusaku Arakawa | Shusaku Arakawa | Michael Hogan | Michael Hogan | Ariella Azoulay | Ariella Azoulay | Chomsky | Chomsky | Freud | Freud | Edward Said | Edward Said

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity. In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21H.153 | 21G.069 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | Asian American feminisms | feminism | feminism | ethnic nationalism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | class and labor issues | domestic violence | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603J | SP.603 | SP.603

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.150 Teaching and Learning: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (MIT) 21A.150 Teaching and Learning: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (MIT)

Description

This course explores the diverse ways that people teach and learn—in different countries, in different disciplines, and in different subcultures. We will discuss how theories of learning can be applied to a variety of hands-on, in-class learning activities. We compare schooling to other forms of knowledge transmission from initiation and apprenticeship to recent innovations in online education such as MOOCs. Students will employ a range of qualitative methods in conducting original research on topics of their choice. This course explores the diverse ways that people teach and learn—in different countries, in different disciplines, and in different subcultures. We will discuss how theories of learning can be applied to a variety of hands-on, in-class learning activities. We compare schooling to other forms of knowledge transmission from initiation and apprenticeship to recent innovations in online education such as MOOCs. Students will employ a range of qualitative methods in conducting original research on topics of their choice.

Subjects

teaching | teaching | learning | learning | culture | culture | cross-cultural perspectives | cross-cultural perspectives | subcultures | subcultures | schooling | schooling | initiation | initiation | apprenticeship | apprenticeship | education | education | online education | online education | MOOCs | MOOCs | interviewing | interviewing | observation | observation | ethnography | ethnography | discourse analysis | discourse analysis | socialization | socialization | social learning | social learning | ritual | ritual | rites of passage | rites of passage | imitation | imitation | improvisation | improvisation | creativity | creativity | language | language | personhood | personhood | identity | identity | cognition | cognition | perception | perception

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT)

Description

This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial?

Subjects

how society should respond to poverty | race | politics of welfare | out-of-wedlock births | homelessness | crime | drugs | knowledge about poverty and community | empowerment from social science research | public discourse and politics | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | social controversy | 1990s | poverty | welfare | extra-marital births | values | politics | public policy | social science research | public discourse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.020 Poverty, Public Policy and Controversy (MIT)

Description

This course covers topics and questions such as: What is poverty? How is it defined and measured in the United States and other countries? What are the different program designs that countries use to relieve poverty? To answer these questions, the course examines the main public policy frames that guide theory, research, policy, and practice. How do the definition and policies to deal with poverty change over time? What are the economic, political, and social forces that contribute to the persistence of poverty and its periodic reframing? Can social science to help to resolve the public policy debates that make poverty and its relief so controversial?

Subjects

how society should respond to poverty | race | politics of welfare | out-of-wedlock births | homelessness | crime | drugs | knowledge about poverty and community | empowerment from social science research | public discourse and politics | assumptions on which American approaches to poverty are based | social controversy | 1990s | poverty | welfare | extra-marital births | values | politics | public policy | social science research | public discourse

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.903 Language and its Structure III: Semantics and Pragmatics (MIT) 24.903 Language and its Structure III: Semantics and Pragmatics (MIT)

Description

This course gives an introduction to the science of linguistic meaning. There are two branches to this discipline: semantics, the study of conventional, "compositional meaning", and pragmatics, the study of interactional meaning. There are other contributaries: philosophy, logic, syntax, and psychology. We will try to give you an understanding of the concepts of semantics and pragmatics and of some of the technical tools that we use. This course gives an introduction to the science of linguistic meaning. There are two branches to this discipline: semantics, the study of conventional, "compositional meaning", and pragmatics, the study of interactional meaning. There are other contributaries: philosophy, logic, syntax, and psychology. We will try to give you an understanding of the concepts of semantics and pragmatics and of some of the technical tools that we use.

Subjects

semantic theory | semantic theory | pragmatic theory | pragmatic theory | form and meaning in natural languages | form and meaning in natural languages | Ambiguities of structure and of meaning | Ambiguities of structure and of meaning | Compositionality | Compositionality | Word meaning | Word meaning | Quantification and logical form | Quantification and logical form | indexicality | indexicality | discourse | discourse | presupposition | presupposition | Literal meaning vs speaker's meaning | Literal meaning vs speaker's meaning | Speech acts | Speech acts | conversational implicature meaning | conversational implicature meaning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.948 The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq (MIT) 11.948 The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq (MIT)

Description

This course is being offered in conjunction with the colloquium The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq, which is sponsored by MIT’s Center for International Studies and Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Fundamentally, the course focuses on contemporary post-conflict countries (or in-conflict countries) and the role of planning and reconstruction in building nations, mitigating conflicts, reshaping the social, spatial, geopolitical, and political life, and determining the country’s future. This course is being offered in conjunction with the colloquium The Politics of Reconstructing Iraq, which is sponsored by MIT’s Center for International Studies and Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Fundamentally, the course focuses on contemporary post-conflict countries (or in-conflict countries) and the role of planning and reconstruction in building nations, mitigating conflicts, reshaping the social, spatial, geopolitical, and political life, and determining the country’s future.

Subjects

planning | planning | politics | politics | post-conflict reconstruction | post-conflict reconstruction | Marshall Plan | Marshall Plan | reconstruction of Japan | reconstruction of Japan | Bosnia and Herzegovina | Bosnia and Herzegovina | September 11 reconstruction | September 11 reconstruction | Iraq politics and society | Iraq politics and society | post-war planning | post-war planning | building democracy | building democracy | international organizations | international organizations | Iraqi-Arab discourse | Iraqi-Arab discourse | vision | vision | stability | stability | resistance | resistance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Text in the Social Sciences Session 2: Text as Discourse

Description

Félix Krawatzek and Andy Eggers discuss methods to analyse large bodies of text in more systematic and reliable ways. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

text | data | methods | quantitative | discourse | text | data | methods | quantitative | discourse | 2016-03-22

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.460 Medieval Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Chaucer (MIT) 21L.460 Medieval Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Chaucer (MIT)

Description

The course explores the literary masterworks of three of the most celebrated authors of the Middle Ages in their original literary and historical contexts. The various themes they take up - the importance of writing in the vernacular; the discourse of love as a form of discipline practised upon the self; the personal and political aspirations of the self in society; the constitution of ideal forms of social organization; the role of religion in the life and works of lay authors - transformed the course of much of Western literature for the next five centuries. Readings will include the entire Divine Comedy, generous selections from the Decameron, and all of Troilus and Criseyde in the original Middle English, together with samplings from the Troubadour tradition and the dolce stil nuovo. The course explores the literary masterworks of three of the most celebrated authors of the Middle Ages in their original literary and historical contexts. The various themes they take up - the importance of writing in the vernacular; the discourse of love as a form of discipline practised upon the self; the personal and political aspirations of the self in society; the constitution of ideal forms of social organization; the role of religion in the life and works of lay authors - transformed the course of much of Western literature for the next five centuries. Readings will include the entire Divine Comedy, generous selections from the Decameron, and all of Troilus and Criseyde in the original Middle English, together with samplings from the Troubadour tradition and the dolce stil nuovo.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | masterworks | masterworks | Middle Ages | Middle Ages | writing | writing | vernacular | vernacular | discourse of love | discourse of love | discipline | discipline | self | self | personal | personal | political | political | aspirations | aspirations | society | society | ideal forms | ideal forms | social organization | social organization | religion | religion | life | life | Western literature | Western literature | Divine Comedy | Divine Comedy | Decameron | Decameron | Troilus and Criseyde | Troilus and Criseyde | troubadour tradition | troubadour tradition | dolce stil nuovo. | dolce stil nuovo. | dolce stil nuovo | dolce stil nuovo

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.218J Identity and Difference (MIT) 21A.218J Identity and Difference (MIT)

Description

This course explores how identities, whether of individuals or groups, are produced, maintained, and transformed. Students will be introduced to various theoretical perspectives that deal with identity formation, including constructions of "the normal." We will explore the utility of these perspectives for understanding identity components such as gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, language, social class, and bodily difference. By semester's end students will understand better how an individual can be at once cause and consequence of society, a unique agent of social action as well as a social product. This course explores how identities, whether of individuals or groups, are produced, maintained, and transformed. Students will be introduced to various theoretical perspectives that deal with identity formation, including constructions of "the normal." We will explore the utility of these perspectives for understanding identity components such as gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, language, social class, and bodily difference. By semester's end students will understand better how an individual can be at once cause and consequence of society, a unique agent of social action as well as a social product.

Subjects

21A.218 | 21A.218 | WGS.170 | WGS.170 | class | class | social interaction | social interaction | discourse | discourse | performance | performance | bodies | bodies | conformity | conformity | deviance | deviance | gender | gender | biology | biology | culture | culture | race | race | constructivism | constructivism | essentialism | essentialism | structuralism | structuralism | incarceration | incarceration | religion | religion | food | food | group membership | group membership | sexuality | sexuality | ethnicity | ethnicity | institution | institution | identity formation | identity formation | stigma | stigma

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.881 Natural Language Processing (MIT) 6.881 Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate level introduction to natural language processing, the primary concern of which is the study of human language from a computational perspective.The class will cover models at the level of syntactic, semantic and discourse processing. The emphasis will be on corpus-based methods and algorithms, such as Hidden Markov Models and probabilistic context free grammars. We will discuss the use of these methods and models in a variety of applications including syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, and summarization.This subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .gz and .tar This course is a graduate level introduction to natural language processing, the primary concern of which is the study of human language from a computational perspective.The class will cover models at the level of syntactic, semantic and discourse processing. The emphasis will be on corpus-based methods and algorithms, such as Hidden Markov Models and probabilistic context free grammars. We will discuss the use of these methods and models in a variety of applications including syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, and summarization.This subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .gz and .tar

Subjects

syntactic models | syntactic models | semantic models | semantic models | discourse processing models | discourse processing models | corpus-based methods | corpus-based methods | algorithms | algorithms | Hidden Markov Models | Hidden Markov Models | probabilistic context free grammars | probabilistic context free grammars | syntactic parsing | syntactic parsing | information extraction | information extraction | statistical machine translation | statistical machine translation | summarization | summarization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT) 6.863J Natural Language and the Computer Representation of Knowledge (MIT)

Description

6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design. 6.863 is a laboratory-oriented course on the theory and practice of building computer systems for human language processing, with an emphasis on the linguistic, cognitive, and engineering foundations for understanding their design.

Subjects

natural language processing | natural language processing | computational methods | computational methods | computer science | computer science | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | linguistic theory | linguistic theory | psycholinguistics | psycholinguistics | applications | applications | thematic structure | thematic structure | lexical-conceptual structure | lexical-conceptual structure | semantic structure | semantic structure | pragmatic structure | pragmatic structure | discourse structure | discourse structure | phonology | phonology | morphology | morphology | 2-level morphology | 2-level morphology | kimmo | kimmo | hmm tagging | hmm tagging | tagging | tagging | rule-based tagging | rule-based tagging | part of speech tagging | part of speech tagging | brill tagger | brill tagger | parsing | parsing | syntax | syntax | automata | automata | word modeling | word modeling | grammars | grammars | parsing algorithms | parsing algorithms | shift-reduce parsers | shift-reduce parsers | Earley's algorithm | Earley's algorithm | chart parsing | chart parsing | context-free parsing | context-free parsing | feature-based parsing | feature-based parsing | natural language system design | natural language system design | integrated lexicon | integrated lexicon | syntactic features | syntactic features | semantic interpretation | semantic interpretation | compositionality | compositionality | quantifiers | quantifiers | lexical semantic | lexical semantic | semantics | semantics | machine translation | machine translation | language learning | language learning | computational models of language | computational models of language | origins of language | origins of language | 6.863 | 6.863 | 9.611 | 9.611

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT) 21G.013 Out of Ground Zero: Catastrophe and Memory (MIT)

Description

Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan. Within twenty-four hours of the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 politicians, artists, and cultural critics had begun to ask how to memorialize the deaths of thousands of people. This question persists today, but it can also be countered with another: is building a monument the best way to commemorate that moment in history? What might other discourses, media, and art forms offer in such a project of collective memory? How can these cultural formations help us to assess the immediate reaction to the attack? To approach these issues, "Out of Ground Zero" looks back to earlier sites of catastrophe in Germany and Japan.

Subjects

World Trade Center | World Trade Center | September 11 | September 11 | memorial | memorial | discourse | discourse | media | media | art | art | collective memory | collective memory | Germany | Germany | Japan | Japan | global commerce | global commerce | transportation systems | transportation systems | surveillance | surveillance | non-Western cultures | non-Western cultures | oppositional political formations | oppositional political formations | Robert Musil | Robert Musil | Maurice Halbwachs | Maurice Halbwachs | Shusaku Arakawa | Shusaku Arakawa | Michael Hogan | Michael Hogan | Ariella Azoulay | Ariella Azoulay | Chomsky | Chomsky | Freud | Freud | Edward Said | Edward Said

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | literary arts | storytelling | poetry | live performance | ritual | entertainment | communities | social norms | audiences | plays | dramatic structure | performing arts | writing | discussion | writer | speaker | cultures | tools | fiction | ethical | historical | political | artistic | questions | creativity | self-awareness | communicate | theater | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | many theatre artists | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre architecture | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | tiring house | realistic theatre | scene design | staging practices | female playwrights | crisis drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Show Trials | Great Terror | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Galileo | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Stalin | Bukharin | Scopes | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | public discussion | legal system | legal reasoning | storytelling | evidence | interpretation | law | society | social issues | public discourse | narrative | dissenters | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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UKOER Architecture Session Plans and Resources around Cultural Context and Discourse in Architecture

Description

A series of resources constituting a 9-week programme of study on the concepts of Cultural Context and Discourse in Architecture.

Subjects

architecture | discourse | renaissance | rationalism | medieval architecture | modernism | ukoer | planning | K000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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6.881 Natural Language Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate level introduction to natural language processing, the primary concern of which is the study of human language from a computational perspective.The class will cover models at the level of syntactic, semantic and discourse processing. The emphasis will be on corpus-based methods and algorithms, such as Hidden Markov Models and probabilistic context free grammars. We will discuss the use of these methods and models in a variety of applications including syntactic parsing, information extraction, statistical machine translation, and summarization.This subject qualifies as an Artificial Intelligence and Applications concentration subject.Technical RequirementsFile decompression software, such as Winzip® or StuffIt®, is required to open the .gz and .tar

Subjects

syntactic models | semantic models | discourse processing models | corpus-based methods | algorithms | Hidden Markov Models | probabilistic context free grammars | syntactic parsing | information extraction | statistical machine translation | summarization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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