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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT) STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page. This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page.

Subjects

technology; | technology; | technology | technology | society | society | modern | modern | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | present | present | discovery | discovery | progress | progress | history | history | physics | physics | chemistry | chemistry | biology | biology | genetics | genetics | geology | geology | medicine | medicine | psychology | psychology | computer science | computer science | race | race | ethics | ethics | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | warfare | warfare | evolution | evolution | Freud | Freud | Einstein | Einstein | Darwin | Darwin | experiment | experiment | eugenics | eugenics | technology and society | technology and society | policy | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.15 Biochemistry and Pharmacology of Synaptic Transmission (MIT) 9.15 Biochemistry and Pharmacology of Synaptic Transmission (MIT)

Description

This course considers the process of neurotransmission, especially chemicals used in the brain and elsewhere to carry signals from nerve terminals to the structures they innervate. The class focuses on monoamine transmitters (acetylcholine; serotonin; dopamine and norepinephrine); it also examines amino acid and peptide transmitters and neuromodulators like adenosine. Macromolecules that mediate neurotransmitter synthesis, release, inactivation, and receptor-mediated actions are discussed, as well as factors that regulate their activity and the second-messenger systems they control. This course considers the process of neurotransmission, especially chemicals used in the brain and elsewhere to carry signals from nerve terminals to the structures they innervate. The class focuses on monoamine transmitters (acetylcholine; serotonin; dopamine and norepinephrine); it also examines amino acid and peptide transmitters and neuromodulators like adenosine. Macromolecules that mediate neurotransmitter synthesis, release, inactivation, and receptor-mediated actions are discussed, as well as factors that regulate their activity and the second-messenger systems they control.

Subjects

neurotransmission | neurotransmission | nerve terminals | nerve terminals | monoamine transmitters | monoamine transmitters | acetylcholine | acetylcholine | serotonin | serotonin | dopamine | dopamine | norepinephrine | norepinephrine | amino acid and peptide transmitters | amino acid and peptide transmitters | neuromodulators | neuromodulators | adenosine | adenosine | neurotransmitter synthesis | neurotransmitter synthesis | release | release | inactivation | inactivation | receptor-mediated | receptor-mediated | second-messenger | second-messenger | neurotransmitter | neurotransmitter | antidepressant | antidepressant | brain lipid | brain lipid | blood brain barrier | blood brain barrier | parkinson's disease | parkinson's disease | seratonin | seratonin | depression | depression | glutamate | glutamate | aspartate | aspartate | NDMA | NDMA | drug | drug | drug discovery | drug discovery | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | signaling pathway | signaling pathway | receptor | receptor | spinal cord | spinal cord | marijuana | marijuana | adensosine | adensosine | histamine | histamine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.263 The Nature of Creativity (MIT) 24.263 The Nature of Creativity (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is an introduction to problems about creativity as it pervades human experience and behavior. Questions about imagination and innovation are studied in relation to the history of philosophy as well as more recent work in philosophy, affective psychology, cognitive studies, and art theory. Readings and guidance are aligned with the student's focus of interest. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is an introduction to problems about creativity as it pervades human experience and behavior. Questions about imagination and innovation are studied in relation to the history of philosophy as well as more recent work in philosophy, affective psychology, cognitive studies, and art theory. Readings and guidance are aligned with the student's focus of interest.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | creativity | creativity | creation | creation | emotion | emotion | discovery | discovery | invention | invention | experience | experience | evolution | evolution | affective computing | affective computing | meaning | meaning | aesthetics | aesthetics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.508 Genomics and Computational Biology (MIT) HST.508 Genomics and Computational Biology (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course will assess the relationships among sequence, structure, and function in complex biological networks as well as progress in realistic modeling of quantitative, comprehensive, functional genomics analyses. Exercises will include algorithmic, statistical, database, and simulation approaches and practical applications to medicine, biotechnology, drug discovery, and genetic engineering. Future opportunities and current limitations will be critically addressed. In addition to the regular lecture sessions, supplementary sections are scheduled to address issues related to Perl, Mathematica and biology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course will assess the relationships among sequence, structure, and function in complex biological networks as well as progress in realistic modeling of quantitative, comprehensive, functional genomics analyses. Exercises will include algorithmic, statistical, database, and simulation approaches and practical applications to medicine, biotechnology, drug discovery, and genetic engineering. Future opportunities and current limitations will be critically addressed. In addition to the regular lecture sessions, supplementary sections are scheduled to address issues related to Perl, Mathematica and biology.

Subjects

sequence | sequence | structure | structure | function | function | complex biological networks | complex biological networks | quantative modeling | quantative modeling | functional genomics analyses | functional genomics analyses | algorithms | algorithms | statistics | statistics | database | database | simulation | simulation | applied medicine | applied medicine | biotechnology | biotechnology | drug discovery | drug discovery | computational biology | computational biology | genetic engineering | genetic engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.096 Algorithms for Computational Biology (MIT) 6.096 Algorithms for Computational Biology (MIT)

Description

This course is offered to undergraduates and addresses several algorithmic challenges in computational biology. The principles of algorithmic design for biological datasets are studied and existing algorithms analyzed for application to real datasets. Topics covered include: biological sequence analysis, gene identification, regulatory motif discovery, genome assembly, genome duplication and rearrangements, evolutionary theory, clustering algorithms, and scale-free networks. This course is offered to undergraduates and addresses several algorithmic challenges in computational biology. The principles of algorithmic design for biological datasets are studied and existing algorithms analyzed for application to real datasets. Topics covered include: biological sequence analysis, gene identification, regulatory motif discovery, genome assembly, genome duplication and rearrangements, evolutionary theory, clustering algorithms, and scale-free networks.

Subjects

biological sequence analysis | biological sequence analysis | gene finding | gene finding | motif discovery | motif discovery | RNA folding | RNA folding | global and local sequence alignment | global and local sequence alignment | genome assembly | genome assembly | comparative genomics | comparative genomics | genome duplication | genome duplication | genome rearrangements | genome rearrangements | evolutionary theory | evolutionary theory | gene expression | gene expression | clustering algorithms | clustering algorithms | scale-free networks | scale-free networks | machine learning applications | machine learning applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.15 Biochemistry and Pharmacology of Synaptic Transmission (MIT) 9.15 Biochemistry and Pharmacology of Synaptic Transmission (MIT)

Description

This course considers the process of neurotransmission, especially chemicals used in the brain and elsewhere to carry signals from nerve terminals to the structures they innervate. We focus on monoamine transmitters (acetylcholine; serotonin; dopamine and norepinephrine); we also examine amino acid and peptide transmitters and neuromodulators like adenosine. Macromolecules that mediate neurotransmitter synthesis, release, inactivation and receptor-mediated actions are discussed, as well as factors that regulate their activity and the second-messenger systems and ion fluxes that they control. The involvement of particular neurotransmitters in human diseases is considered. This course considers the process of neurotransmission, especially chemicals used in the brain and elsewhere to carry signals from nerve terminals to the structures they innervate. We focus on monoamine transmitters (acetylcholine; serotonin; dopamine and norepinephrine); we also examine amino acid and peptide transmitters and neuromodulators like adenosine. Macromolecules that mediate neurotransmitter synthesis, release, inactivation and receptor-mediated actions are discussed, as well as factors that regulate their activity and the second-messenger systems and ion fluxes that they control. The involvement of particular neurotransmitters in human diseases is considered.

Subjects

Neurotransmitter | Neurotransmitter | antidepressant | antidepressant | brain lipid | brain lipid | blood brain barrier | blood brain barrier | dopamine | dopamine | parkinson's disease | parkinson's disease | serotonin | serotonin | depression | depression | glutamate | glutamate | aspartate | aspartate | NDMA | NDMA | drug | drug | drug discovery | drug discovery | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | signaling pathway | signaling pathway | receptor | receptor | spinal cord | spinal cord | marijuana | marijuana | adensosine | adensosine | histamine. | histamine.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT) 16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT)

Description

This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj

Subjects

Expository writing | Expository writing | analyzing | analyzing | mass | mass | media | media | voice | voice | academic | academic | writing | writing | self-discovery | self-discovery | critical thinking | critical thinking | communicating | communicating | audience | audience | drafting | drafting | revising | revising | essays | essays | analysis techniques | analysis techniques | complex structures | complex structures | material properties | material properties | structural design | structural design | failure | failure | longevity | longevity | Energy principles | Energy principles | structural analysis | structural analysis | statically-indeterminate structures | statically-indeterminate structures | solid continua | solid continua | Crack formation | Crack formation | fracture mechanics | fracture mechanics | failure modes | failure modes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.453J Biomedical Information Technology (MIT) 20.453J Biomedical Information Technology (MIT)

Description

This course teaches the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. Examples are chosen from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (e.g. C, C++, Java, Lisp, Perl, Python). A major term project is required of all students. This subject is open to motivated seniors having a strong interest in biomedical engineering and information system desig This course teaches the design of contemporary information systems for biological and medical data. Examples are chosen from biology and medicine to illustrate complete life cycle information systems, beginning with data acquisition, following to data storage and finally to retrieval and analysis. Design of appropriate databases, client-server strategies, data interchange protocols, and computational modeling architectures. Students are expected to have some familiarity with scientific application software and a basic understanding of at least one contemporary programming language (e.g. C, C++, Java, Lisp, Perl, Python). A major term project is required of all students. This subject is open to motivated seniors having a strong interest in biomedical engineering and information system desig

Subjects

20.453 | 20.453 | 2.771 | 2.771 | HST.958 | HST.958 | imaging | imaging | medical imaging | medical imaging | metadata | metadata | molecular biology | molecular biology | medical records | medical records | DICOM | DICOM | RDF | RDF | OWL | OWL | SPARQL | SPARQL | SBML | SBML | CellML | CellML | semantic web | semantic web | BioHaystack | BioHaystack | database | database | schema | schema | ExperiBase | ExperiBase | genomics | genomics | proteomics | proteomics | bioinformatics | bioinformatics | computational biology | computational biology | clinical decision support | clinical decision support | clinical trial | clinical trial | microarray | microarray | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | diagnosis | diagnosis | pathway modeling | pathway modeling | XML | XML | SQL | SQL | relational database | relational database | biological data | biological data | ontologies | ontologies | drug development | drug development | drug discovery | drug discovery | drug target | drug target | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | gene sequencing | gene sequencing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Students, scholars, bloggers, reviewers, fans, and book-group members write about literature, but so do authors themselves. Through the ways they engage with their own texts and those of other artists, sampling, remixing, and rethinking texts and genres, writers reflect on and inspire questions about the creative process. We will examine Mary Shelley's reshaping of Milton's Paradise Lost, German fairy tales, tales of scientific discovery, and her husband's poems to make Frankenstein (1818, 1831); Melville's redesign of a travel narrative into a Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856); and Alison Bechdel's rewriting of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) in her graphic novel Fun Home (2006). Showings of film versions of some of these works will allow us to project forw Students, scholars, bloggers, reviewers, fans, and book-group members write about literature, but so do authors themselves. Through the ways they engage with their own texts and those of other artists, sampling, remixing, and rethinking texts and genres, writers reflect on and inspire questions about the creative process. We will examine Mary Shelley's reshaping of Milton's Paradise Lost, German fairy tales, tales of scientific discovery, and her husband's poems to make Frankenstein (1818, 1831); Melville's redesign of a travel narrative into a Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856); and Alison Bechdel's rewriting of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) in her graphic novel Fun Home (2006). Showings of film versions of some of these works will allow us to project forw

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | Rethinking texts and genres | Rethinking texts and genres | Mary Shelley’s rewrite of Milton’s Paradise Lost | Mary Shelley’s rewrite of Milton’s Paradise Lost | German fairy tales | German fairy tales | Scientific discovery tales | Scientific discovery tales | Frankenstein (1831) | Frankenstein (1831) | Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856) | Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856) | Alison Bechdel’s rewriting of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) | Alison Bechdel’s rewriting of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) | Fun Home (2006). | Fun Home (2006).

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Artemisinin therapy for malaria by Professor Nick White

Description

Professor Nick White talks about the future of artemisinin and other drug therapies for malaria. Malaria kills more than half a million people every year. Following a number of groundbreaking clinical trials, Professor Nick White and his Thailand team successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of artemisinin drug therapy for malaria in adults, children and infants. He also pioneered artemisinin combination therapy, the first-line treatment for malaria worldwide. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Global health | artemisinin | drug discovery | drug resistance | malaria | Global health | artemisinin | drug discovery | drug resistance | malaria

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Development of chemical probes

Description

Professor Stefan Knapp tells us how the development of chemical probes helps us to find new drugs. The role of proteins in cellular signalling and disease is best studied through the development of highly specific chemical inhibitors, which can serve as a tool molecule for functional studies. Professor Stefan Knapp works to determine the structure of protein molecules to understand their regulation and to aid the design of selective inhibitors that can be developed further into efficient drugs Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

drug discovery | high-throughput | cancer | drug discovery | high-throughput | cancer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Membrane proteins and drug development

Description

Dr Liz Carpenter talks about her research on membrane proteins and drug development. Membrane proteins are the gateways to our cells - with nutrients, waste products, and even DNA and proteins entering and leaving cells via these tightly controlled proteins. Drugs often target membrane proteins; therefore, understanding their molecular structure helps us design better drugs. Dr Liz Carpenter uses X-ray crystallography to solve membrane protein structures. This information is then used to improve treatments for heart disease and neurological diseases. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

membrane proteins | protein structure | high-throughput | drug discovery | ion channel | x-ray crystallography | membrane proteins | protein structure | high-throughput | drug discovery | ion channel | x-ray crystallography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Drug Discovery

Description

Professor Chas Bountra explains how new drugs can offer novel treatments for neurodegenerative and gastrointestinal diseases, as well as pain disorders. Professor Chas Bountra is interested in identifying and validating target proteins for drug discovery. Various technologies and strategies have allowed him to progress promising clinical candidates into Phase I, II, III studies, and to market. Drug candidates are first selected by screening compounds capable of binding to a target protein. Those compounds are then tested in various assay systems, healthy volunteers and finally in patients. Academic research excels at defining good target proteins. Pharmaceutical companies then facilitate the transition from basic research to clinical trials, producing new therapies for patients. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Medicine | drug discovery | target validation | structural biology | disease | Medicine | drug discovery | target validation | structural biology | disease

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Artemisinin therapy for malaria by Professor Nick White

Description

Professor Nick White talks about the future of artemisinin and other drug therapies for malaria. Malaria kills more than half a million people every year. Following a number of groundbreaking clinical trials, Professor Nick White and his Thailand team successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of artemisinin drug therapy for malaria in adults, children and infants. He also pioneered artemisinin combination therapy, the first-line treatment for malaria worldwide. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Global health | artemisinin | drug discovery | drug resistance | malaria | Global health | artemisinin | drug discovery | drug resistance | malaria

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Development of chemical probes

Description

Professor Stefan Knapp tells us how the development of chemical probes helps us to find new drugs. The role of proteins in cellular signalling and disease is best studied through the development of highly specific chemical inhibitors, which can serve as a tool molecule for functional studies. Professor Stefan Knapp works to determine the structure of protein molecules to understand their regulation and to aid the design of selective inhibitors that can be developed further into efficient drugs Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

drug discovery | high-throughput | cancer | drug discovery | high-throughput | cancer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Membrane proteins and drug development

Description

Dr Liz Carpenter talks about her research on membrane proteins and drug development. Membrane proteins are the gateways to our cells - with nutrients, waste products, and even DNA and proteins entering and leaving cells via these tightly controlled proteins. Drugs often target membrane proteins; therefore, understanding their molecular structure helps us design better drugs. Dr Liz Carpenter uses X-ray crystallography to solve membrane protein structures. This information is then used to improve treatments for heart disease and neurological diseases. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

membrane proteins | protein structure | high-throughput | drug discovery | ion channel | x-ray crystallography | membrane proteins | protein structure | high-throughput | drug discovery | ion channel | x-ray crystallography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Drug Discovery

Description

Professor Chas Bountra explains how new drugs can offer novel treatments for neurodegenerative and gastrointestinal diseases, as well as pain disorders. Professor Chas Bountra is interested in identifying and validating target proteins for drug discovery. Various technologies and strategies have allowed him to progress promising clinical candidates into Phase I, II, III studies, and to market. Drug candidates are first selected by screening compounds capable of binding to a target protein. Those compounds are then tested in various assay systems, healthy volunteers and finally in patients. Academic research excels at defining good target proteins. Pharmaceutical companies then facilitate the transition from basic research to clinical trials, producing new therapies for patients. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Medicine | drug discovery | target validation | structural biology | disease | Medicine | drug discovery | target validation | structural biology | disease

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Soccer in Space Soccer in Space

Description

Subjects

space | space | soccer | soccer | nasa | nasa | shuttle | shuttle | 1989 | 1989 | discovery | discovery | pilot | pilot

License

No known copyright restrictions

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STS-51C STS-51C

Description

Subjects

discovery | discovery | january24 | january24 | garypayton | garypayton | january27 | january27 | ellisononizuka | ellisononizuka | lorenshriver | lorenshriver | sts51c | sts51c | thomasmattingly | thomasmattingly | jamesbuchli | jamesbuchli

License

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STS-51C STS-51C

Description

Subjects

discovery | discovery | january24 | january24 | garypayton | garypayton | january27 | january27 | ellisononizuka | ellisononizuka | lorenshriver | lorenshriver | sts51c | sts51c | thomasmattingly | thomasmattingly | jamesbuchli | jamesbuchli

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Brown and Glenn on Flight Deck Press Conference Brown and Glenn on Flight Deck Press Conference

Description

Subjects

sts95discoveryflightdeckjohnglenncurtisbrown | sts95discoveryflightdeckjohnglenncurtisbrown

License

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STS-29 STS-29

Description

Subjects

1989 | 1989 | discovery | discovery | march13 | march13 | march18 | march18 | johnblaha | johnblaha | michaelcoats | michaelcoats | sts29 | sts29 | robertspringer | robertspringer | jamesbagian | jamesbagian | jamesbuchli | jamesbuchli

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT) 21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web. As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web.

Subjects

reading | reading | writing | writing | essay | essay | literary | literary | rhetorical | rhetorical | tradition | tradition | genre | genre | prose | prose | antiquity | antiquity | modern | modern | popular | popular | form | form | print | print | media | media | web | web | functions | functions | commentary | commentary | others | others | textual | textual | numerical | numerical | data | data | discovery | discovery | meaning | meaning | personal experience | personal experience | narration | narration | specialized | specialized | knowledge | knowledge | general | general | audience. | audience.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT) 21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience. This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience.

Subjects

Expository writing | Expository writing | analyzing | analyzing | mass | mass | media | media | voice | voice | academic | academic | writing | writing | self-discovery | self-discovery | critical thinking | critical thinking | communicating | communicating | audience | audience | drafting | drafting | revising | revising | essays | essays

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sunlight over Earth as seen by STS-29 crew Sunlight over Earth as seen by STS-29 crew

Description

Subjects

cloud | cloud | discovery | discovery | sts29 | sts29 | earthobservations | earthobservations

License

No known copyright restrictions

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