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11.493 Legal Aspects of Property and Land Use (MIT) 11.493 Legal Aspects of Property and Land Use (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to offer an advanced introduction to key legal issues that arise in the area of property and land-use in American law, with a comparative focus on the laws of India and South Africa. The focus of the course is not on law itself, but on the policy implications of various rules, doctrines and practices which are covered in great detail. Legal rules regulating property are among the most fundamental to American, and most other, economies and societies. The main focus is on American property and land use law due to its prominence in international development policy and practice as a model, though substantial comparative legal materials are also introduced from selected non-western countries such as India and South Africa. This course is designed to offer an advanced introduction to key legal issues that arise in the area of property and land-use in American law, with a comparative focus on the laws of India and South Africa. The focus of the course is not on law itself, but on the policy implications of various rules, doctrines and practices which are covered in great detail. Legal rules regulating property are among the most fundamental to American, and most other, economies and societies. The main focus is on American property and land use law due to its prominence in international development policy and practice as a model, though substantial comparative legal materials are also introduced from selected non-western countries such as India and South Africa.

Subjects

property law | property law | law | law | property | property | land use | land use | property fairness | property fairness | competition | competition | public trust | public trust | trespass | trespass | fair use | fair use | easements | easements | nuisance laws | nuisance laws | zoning | zoning | environmental regulations | environmental regulations | slavery | slavery | racial discrimination | racial discrimination | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | economic discrimination | takings | takings | licenses | licenses | servitudes | servitudes | contestation | contestation | covenants | covenants | common ownership | common ownership | housing | housing | apartheid | apartheid | restitution | restitution | eviction | eviction | displacement | displacement | international development | international development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 Constitutional Law: Structures of Power and Individual Rights (MIT) 17.245 Constitutional Law: Structures of Power and Individual Rights (MIT)

Description

This course examines American constitutional law in historical and modern context. It focuses closely on the constitutional text and Supreme Court case law. It explores the allocation of decision-making authority among government institutions, including the distribution of power across the branches of the federal government and between the federal and state governments. The course also examines the guarantees of individual rights and liberties stemming from the due process, equal protection, and other clauses in the Bill of Rights and post Civil War amendments.AcknowledgmentsProfessor Warshaw would like to acknowledge the training in Constitutional Law he received from Gary J. Jacobsohn, Kathleen Sullivan, and Norman Spaulding.   This course examines American constitutional law in historical and modern context. It focuses closely on the constitutional text and Supreme Court case law. It explores the allocation of decision-making authority among government institutions, including the distribution of power across the branches of the federal government and between the federal and state governments. The course also examines the guarantees of individual rights and liberties stemming from the due process, equal protection, and other clauses in the Bill of Rights and post Civil War amendments.AcknowledgmentsProfessor Warshaw would like to acknowledge the training in Constitutional Law he received from Gary J. Jacobsohn, Kathleen Sullivan, and Norman Spaulding.  

Subjects

federal and state government | federal and state government | Supreme Court | Supreme Court | constitutional law | constitutional law | judicial review | judicial review | judicial interpretation | judicial interpretation | nation-state relations | nation-state relations | commerce clause | commerce clause | Congress | Congress | taxing and spending power | taxing and spending power | due process | due process | economic liberty | economic liberty | right to privacy | right to privacy | personal liberty | personal liberty | abortion | abortion | racial discrimination | racial discrimination | affirmative action | affirmative action | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | economic discrimination | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | same-sex marriage | same-sex marriage | voting | voting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.345 Evolution of the Immune System (MIT) 7.345 Evolution of the Immune System (MIT)

Description

In this course, evolutionary pathways that have led to the development of innate and adaptive immunity are analyzed, the conserved and unique features of the immune response from bacteria to higher vertebrates is traced, and factors, such as adaptive changes in pathogens that have shaped the evolution of immune system are identified.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In this course, evolutionary pathways that have led to the development of innate and adaptive immunity are analyzed, the conserved and unique features of the immune response from bacteria to higher vertebrates is traced, and factors, such as adaptive changes in pathogens that have shaped the evolution of immune system are identified.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting.

Subjects

immune system | immune system | immunology | immunology | evolution of immune system | evolution of immune system | immune defence | immune defence | phagocytosis | phagocytosis | innate immunity | innate immunity | adaptive immunity | adaptive immunity | immunological memory | immunological memory | immune response | immune response | defence mechanisms | defence mechanisms | pathogens | pathogens | self discrimination | self discrimination | non-self discrimination | non-self discrimination | recognition | recognition | immune receptors | immune receptors | antigen | antigen

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 Constitutional Law: Structures of Power and Individual Rights (MIT)

Description

This course examines American constitutional law in historical and modern context. It focuses closely on the constitutional text and Supreme Court case law. It explores the allocation of decision-making authority among government institutions, including the distribution of power across the branches of the federal government and between the federal and state governments. The course also examines the guarantees of individual rights and liberties stemming from the due process, equal protection, and other clauses in the Bill of Rights and post Civil War amendments.AcknowledgmentsProfessor Warshaw would like to acknowledge the training in Constitutional Law he received from Gary J. Jacobsohn, Kathleen Sullivan, and Norman Spaulding.  

Subjects

federal and state government | Supreme Court | constitutional law | judicial review | judicial interpretation | nation-state relations | commerce clause | Congress | taxing and spending power | due process | economic liberty | right to privacy | personal liberty | abortion | racial discrimination | affirmative action | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | sexual orientation | same-sex marriage | voting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.493 Legal Aspects of Property and Land Use (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to offer an advanced introduction to key legal issues that arise in the area of property and land-use in American law, with a comparative focus on the laws of India and South Africa. The focus of the course is not on law itself, but on the policy implications of various rules, doctrines and practices which are covered in great detail. Legal rules regulating property are among the most fundamental to American, and most other, economies and societies. The main focus is on American property and land use law due to its prominence in international development policy and practice as a model, though substantial comparative legal materials are also introduced from selected non-western countries such as India and South Africa.

Subjects

property law | law | property | land use | property fairness | competition | public trust | trespass | fair use | easements | nuisance laws | zoning | environmental regulations | slavery | racial discrimination | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | takings | licenses | servitudes | contestation | covenants | common ownership | housing | apartheid | restitution | eviction | displacement | international development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests. Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests.

Subjects

labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

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EC.721 Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (MIT) EC.721 Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. According to the United States Agency for International Development, 20 million people in developing countries require wheelchairs, and the United Nations Development Programme estimates below 1% of their need is being met in Africa by local production. Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (WDDC) gives students the chance to better the lives of others by improving wheelchairs and tricycles made in the developing world. Lectures will focus on understanding local factors, such as operating environments, social stigmas against the disabled, and manufacturing constraints, and then applying sound scientific/engineering knowledge to develop appropriate technical solutions. Multidisciplinary student teams will conduct term-long projects Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. According to the United States Agency for International Development, 20 million people in developing countries require wheelchairs, and the United Nations Development Programme estimates below 1% of their need is being met in Africa by local production. Wheelchair Design in Developing Countries (WDDC) gives students the chance to better the lives of others by improving wheelchairs and tricycles made in the developing world. Lectures will focus on understanding local factors, such as operating environments, social stigmas against the disabled, and manufacturing constraints, and then applying sound scientific/engineering knowledge to develop appropriate technical solutions. Multidisciplinary student teams will conduct term-long projects

Subjects

appropriate technology | appropriate technology | engineering | engineering | local production | local production | third world | third world | disabled | disabled | disability | disability | assistive technology | assistive technology | human power | human power | Africa | Africa | Tanzania | Tanzania | Zambia | Zambia | Kenya | Kenya | handicap | handicap | handicapped | handicapped | poverty | poverty | rural | rural | discrimination | discrimination | orthopedic | orthopedic | mobility | mobility | tricycle | tricycle | handcycle | handcycle | product design | product design | business plan | business plan | ergonomics | ergonomics | manufacturing | manufacturing | stakeholder | stakeholder | service learning | service learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT) 14.121 Microeconomic Theory I (MIT)

Description

This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered. This half-semester course provides an introduction to microeconomic theory designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. Some parts of the course are designed to teach material that all graduate students should know. Others are used to introduce methodologies. Topics include consumer and producer theory, markets and competition, general equilibrium, and tools of comparative statics and their application to price theory. Some topics of recent interest may also be covered.

Subjects

microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | demand theory | demand theory | producer theory; partial equilibrium | producer theory; partial equilibrium | competitive markets | competitive markets | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | externalities | externalities | Afriat's theorem | Afriat's theorem | pricing | pricing | robust comparative statics | robust comparative statics | utility theory | utility theory | properties of preferences | properties of preferences | choice as primitive | choice as primitive | revealed preference | revealed preference | classical demand theory | classical demand theory | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | Kuhn-Tucker necessary conditions | implications of Walras?s law | implications of Walras?s law | indirect utility functions | indirect utility functions | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | theorem of the maximum (Berge?s theorem) | expenditure minimization problem | expenditure minimization problem | Hicksian demands | Hicksian demands | compensated law of demand | compensated law of demand | Slutsky substitution | Slutsky substitution | price changes and welfare | price changes and welfare | compensating variation | compensating variation | and welfare from new goods | and welfare from new goods | price indexes | price indexes | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | bias in the U.S. consumer price index | integrability | integrability | demand aggregation | demand aggregation | aggregate demand and welfare | aggregate demand and welfare | Frisch demands | Frisch demands | and demand estimation | and demand estimation | increasing differences | increasing differences | producer theory applications | producer theory applications | the LeCh?telier principle | the LeCh?telier principle | Topkis? theorem | Topkis? theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | Milgrom-Shannon monotonicity theorem | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | monopoly and product quality | monopoly and product quality | nonlinear pricing | nonlinear pricing | and price discrimination | and price discrimination | simple models of externalities | simple models of externalities | government intervention | government intervention | Coase theorem | Coase theorem | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | Myerson-Sattherthwaite proposition | missing markets | missing markets | price vs. quantity regulations | price vs. quantity regulations | Weitzman?s analysis | Weitzman?s analysis | uncertainty | uncertainty | common property externalities | common property externalities | optimization | optimization | equilibrium number of boats | equilibrium number of boats | welfare theorems | welfare theorems | uniqueness and determinacy | uniqueness and determinacy | price-taking assumption | price-taking assumption | Edgeworth box | Edgeworth box | welfare properties | welfare properties | Pareto efficiency | Pareto efficiency | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Walrasian equilibrium with transfers | Arrow-Debreu economy | Arrow-Debreu economy | separating hyperplanes | separating hyperplanes | Minkowski?s theorem | Minkowski?s theorem | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Existence of Walrasian equilibrium | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Kakutani?s fixed point theorem | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | Debreu-Gale-Kuhn-Nikaido lemma | additional properties of general equilibrium | additional properties of general equilibrium | Microfoundations | Microfoundations | core | core | core convergence | core convergence | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | general equilibrium with time and uncertainty | Jensen?s inequality | Jensen?s inequality | and security market economy | and security market economy | arbitrage pricing theory | arbitrage pricing theory | and risk-neutral probabilities | and risk-neutral probabilities | Housing markets | Housing markets | competitive equilibrium | competitive equilibrium | one-sided matching house allocation problem | one-sided matching house allocation problem | serial dictatorship | serial dictatorship | two-sided matching | two-sided matching | marriage markets | marriage markets | existence of stable matchings | existence of stable matchings | incentives | incentives | housing markets core mechanism | housing markets core mechanism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT) 14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment.

Subjects

labor Economics | labor Economics | public policy | public policy | applied microeconomics | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | taxes and transfers | human capital | human capital | minimum wages | minimum wages | income distribution | income distribution | unions and strikes | unions and strikes | immigration | immigration | incentives | incentives | discrimination | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance | unemployment and unemployment insurance | bargaining | bargaining | economics of the family | economics of the family | decision to work | decision to work | home production | home production | monpsony | monpsony | education | education | training | training

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.246 Current Events and Social Issues (MIT) SP.246 Current Events and Social Issues (MIT)

Description

The goal of this seminar is to have open discussions of controversial political and social issues and raise awareness of current world events in an informal setting. Discussions for the first part of each class will focus on current events from that week, while in the second part of class students will discuss a scheduled issue in greater detail. Scheduled issues include the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the regulation of marijuana, how our society should punish criminals, genocide in Rwanda and Sudan, discrimination in our society today, the future of social security, whether pornography is sexist, and where we can go from here in the Arab/Israeli Conflict. Discussions will be supplemented by readings, films, and public speakers. Students will also be encouraged to read news media from ar The goal of this seminar is to have open discussions of controversial political and social issues and raise awareness of current world events in an informal setting. Discussions for the first part of each class will focus on current events from that week, while in the second part of class students will discuss a scheduled issue in greater detail. Scheduled issues include the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the regulation of marijuana, how our society should punish criminals, genocide in Rwanda and Sudan, discrimination in our society today, the future of social security, whether pornography is sexist, and where we can go from here in the Arab/Israeli Conflict. Discussions will be supplemented by readings, films, and public speakers. Students will also be encouraged to read news media from ar

Subjects

Current Events | Current Events | Social Issues | Social Issues | Politics | Politics | War | War | Pornography | Pornography | Sexism | Sexism | Feminism | Feminism | criminal punishment | criminal punishment | marijuana policy | marijuana policy | drug policy | drug policy | social security | social security | discrimination | discrimination | racism | racism | outsourcing | outsourcing | arab-israeli conflict | arab-israeli conflict | abortion | abortion | rwanda | rwanda | genocide | genocide | civil disobedience | civil disobedience | ESG.SP246 | ESG.SP246

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Economics explains discrimination in the labour market Economics explains discrimination in the labour market

Description

Discrimination in the labour market exists in many forms: the 'glass ceiling', ageism, racism, and so on. This free course, Economics explains discrimination in the labour market, will help you look at this problem from a new perspective: through economics. You will learn how economists have tried to understand what drives this distortion of the labour market and why women and those from minority ethnic groups seem to suffer the most. First published on Thu, 14 Jul 2011 as Economics explains discrimination in the labour market. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011 Discrimination in the labour market exists in many forms: the 'glass ceiling', ageism, racism, and so on. This free course, Economics explains discrimination in the labour market, will help you look at this problem from a new perspective: through economics. You will learn how economists have tried to understand what drives this distortion of the labour market and why women and those from minority ethnic groups seem to suffer the most. First published on Thu, 14 Jul 2011 as Economics explains discrimination in the labour market. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2011

Subjects

Economics | Economics | discrimination | discrimination

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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14.731 Economic History (MIT) 14.731 Economic History (MIT)

Description

This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth. This course is a survey of world economic history, and it introduces economics students to the subject matter and methodology of economic history. It is designed to expand the range of empirical settings in students' research by drawing upon historical material and long-run data. Topics are chosen to show a wide variety of historical experience and illuminate the process of industrialization. The emphasis will be on questions related to labor markets and economic growth.

Subjects

Economic History | Economic History | industrialization | industrialization | demographic change | demographic change | policies | policies | Applied Economics | Applied Economics | formulate and test hypotheses | formulate and test hypotheses | labor history | labor history | discrimination | discrimination | technology | technology | institutions | institutions | financial crises | financial crises | migration | migration | recovery after shocks | recovery after shocks | wages | wages | inequality | inequality | health | health | stock market regulation | stock market regulation

License

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14.771 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (MIT) 14.771 Development Economics: Microeconomic Issues and Policy Models (MIT)

Description

Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings. Topics include productivity effects of health, private and social returns to education, education quality, education policy and market equilibrium, gender discrimination, public finance, decision making within families, firms and contracts, technology, labor and migration, land, and the markets for credit and savings.

Subjects

productivity | productivity | health | health | education | education | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | public finance | public finance | decision making | decision making | families | families | firms | firms | contracts | contracts | technology | technology | labor | labor | migration | migration | land | land | credit | credit | savings | savings | poverty | poverty | inequality | inequality | nutrition | nutrition | school choice | school choice | school vouchers | school vouchers | subsidies | subsidies | taxes | taxes | employment | employment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges. This introductory course teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, producer theory, the behavior of firms, market equilibrium, monopoly, and the role of the government in the economy. 14.01 is a Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) elective and is offered both terms. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

market | market | optimization | optimization | allocation | allocation | economic measurement | economic measurement | analysis | analysis | microeconomics | microeconomics | demand | demand | supply | supply | equilibrium | equilibrium | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | government interventions | government interventions | price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | income elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | cross price elasticity of demand | price elasticity of supply | price elasticity of supply | consumer behavior | consumer behavior | consumer preference | consumer preference | utility functions | utility functions | marginal rate of substitution | marginal rate of substitution | budget constraints | budget constraints | interior solutions | interior solutions | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engle curves | Engle curves | individual demand | individual demand | market demand | market demand | revealed preferences | revealed preferences | substitution effect | substitution effect | income effect | income effect | Giffen goods | Giffen goods | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | Irish potato famine | Irish potato famine | network externalities | network externalities | uncertainty | uncertainty | preference toward risk | preference toward risk | risk premium | risk premium | indifference curves | indifference curves | diversification | diversification | insurance | insurance | producer theory | producer theory | production functions | production functions | short run | short run | long run | long run | returns to scale | returns to scale | cost functions | cost functions | economies of scale | economies of scale | economies of scope | economies of scope | learning | learning | profit maximization | profit maximization | producer surplus | producer surplus | agricultural price support | agricultural price support | tax | tax | subsidy | subsidy | exchange economy | exchange economy | contract curves | contract curves | utility possibilities frontier | utility possibilities frontier | Edgeworth Box | Edgeworth Box | production possibilities frontier | production possibilities frontier | efficiency | efficiency | monopoly | monopoly | multiplant firm | multiplant firm | social cost | social cost | price regulation | price regulation | monopsony | monopsony | price discrimination | price discrimination | peak-load pricing | peak-load pricing | two-part tariffs | two-part tariffs | bundling | bundling | monopolistic competition | monopolistic competition | game theory | game theory | oligopoly | oligopoly | Cournot | Cournot | Stackelberg | Stackelberg | Bertrand | Bertrand | Prisoner's Dilemma | Prisoner's Dilemma

License

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14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT) 14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT)

Description

14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them. 14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them.

Subjects

racial discrimination | racial discrimination | public health and persuasion | public health and persuasion | incentives | incentives | gender differences in economic environments | gender differences in economic environments | intrinsic motivation and fairness | intrinsic motivation and fairness | educational quality | educational quality | corruption | corruption | learning and social effects | learning and social effects | housing experiments | housing experiments | voting behavior and political economy | voting behavior and political economy | jury advocacy | jury advocacy | causal inference | causal inference | internal and external threats | internal and external threats | clustering | clustering | standard errors | standard errors | randomization | randomization | statistical inference with multiple outcomes | statistical inference with multiple outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.271 Industrial Organization I (MIT) 14.271 Industrial Organization I (MIT)

Description

The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques. The course integrates theoretical models and empirical studies. The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics and industries that current researchers are studying as well as to expose students to a wide variety of techniques. The course integrates theoretical models and empirical studies.

Subjects

Industrial organization | theoretical models and empirical studies | Industrial organization | theoretical models and empirical studies | structure | behavior | and performance of firms and markets and core issues in antitrust | structure | behavior | and performance of firms and markets and core issues in antitrust | organization of the firm | monopoly | price discrimination | oligopoly | and auctions | organization of the firm | monopoly | price discrimination | oligopoly | and auctions

License

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14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. This course is taught in two parts: Fall term and then in the subsequent Fall term. The aim of this course is to acquaint students with traditional topics in labor economics and to encourage the development of independent research interests. This course is taught in two parts: Fall term and then in the subsequent Fall term.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Equal opportunities and human rights in the public services

Description

Exercise looking at legislation governing equal opportunities and human rights. Includes the Human Rights Act 1998, the Sex Discrimination Act 1975, the Race Relations Act 1976, the Equal Pay Acts 1970 and 1983, the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 and the Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations 2003. Provides links to full text legislation, interactive self-assessment tests and a glossary.

Subjects

age discrimination | women | ethnic groups | pay | sex discrimination | human rights | Employability | Design and delivery of programmes | SCQF4 | Foundation Level | NICAT 1 | Foundation | GCSE D-G | NVQ 1 | Intermediate 1 | UK EL05 = SCQF 5 | Intermediate level | Intermediate | NICAT 2 | CQFW 2 | Intermediate | GSCE A-C | NVQ 2 | | POLITICS / ECONOMICS / LAW / SOCIAL SCIENCES | Law | M000 | E

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT) 17.245 The Supreme Court, Civil Liberties, and Civil Rights (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure. This course introduces students to the work of the Supreme Court and to the main outlines of American constitutional law, with an emphasis on the development of American ideas about civil rights. The goal of the course is to provide students with a framework for understanding the major constitutional controversies of the present day through a reading of landmark Supreme Court cases and the public debates they have generated. The principal topics are civil liberties in wartime, race relations, privacy rights, and the law of criminal procedure.

Subjects

supreme court | supreme court | constitutional law | constitutional law | racial profiling | racial profiling | wartime | wartime | affirmative action | affirmative action | constitutionality | constitutionality | civil rights | civil rights | civil liberties | civil liberties | roe | roe | wade | wade | economic liberties | economic liberties | desegregation | desegregation | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | gay marriage | gay marriage | sexual orientation | sexual orientation | fundamental rights | fundamental rights

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT) 14.27 Economics and E-commerce (MIT)

Description

This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet. This course uses theoretical models and studies of "old economy" industries to help understand the growth and future of electronic commerce. We will begin with a discussion of relevant topics from industrial organization including monopoly pricing, price discrimination, product differentiation, barriers to entry, network externalities, search and first-mover advantages. The largest part of the course will be a discussion of a number of e-industries. In this section we'll discuss extensions and applications of the ideas from the first part of the course, draw analogies to previous technological revolutions and read current case studies. Finally, we'll discuss two additional topics: bubbles in asset markets and the macroeconomic effects of the Internet.

Subjects

industrial organization | industrial organization | monopoly pricing | monopoly pricing | price discrimination | price discrimination | product differentiation | product differentiation | barriers to entry | barriers to entry | network externalities | network externalities | first-mover advantages | first-mover advantages | E-commerce | E-commerce | Cybercommerce | Cybercommerce | E-business | E-business

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT) SP.601J Feminist Theory (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class. This course focuses on a range of theories of gender in modern life. In recent years, feminist scholars in a range of disciplines have challenged previously accepted notions of political theory such as the distinctions between public and private, the definitions of politics itself, the nature of citizenship, and the roles of women in civil society. In this course, we will examine different aspects of women's lives through the life cycle as seen from the vantage point of feminist theory. In addition, we will consider different ways of looking at power and political culture in modern societies, issues of race and class, poverty and welfare, and sexuality and morality. Acknowledgements The instructor would like to thank Lara Yeo for capturing notes and discussion questions in class.

Subjects

Men | Men | Women | Women | Gender | Gender | Feminists | Feminists | Feminist Theory | Feminist Theory | Prostitution | Prostitution | Morality | Morality | Chromosomes | Chromosomes | gender identification | gender identification | work and family | work and family | welfare reform | welfare reform | paternity | paternity | maternity | maternity | divorce | divorce | globalization of women's labor | globalization of women's labor | pornography | pornography | internet | internet | military service | military service | race | race | class | class | 2008 election campaigns | 2008 election campaigns | body image | body image | discrimination | discrimination | date rape | date rape | rape | rape | domestic violence | domestic violence | females in sports | females in sports | embodied knowledge | embodied knowledge | sexuality | sexuality | politics of consent | politics of consent | international economics | international economics | exile and pride | exile and pride | curious feminist | curious feminist | don't call us out of name | don't call us out of name | theorizing feminisms | theorizing feminisms | undoing the silence | undoing the silence | sneaker production | sneaker production | intersectionality | intersectionality | contextualize | contextualize | historicize | historicize

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.601 Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning (MIT) 11.601 Introduction to Environmental Policy and Planning (MIT)

Description

This course is the first subject in the Environmental Policy and Planning sequence. It reviews philosophical debates including growth vs. deep ecology, "command-and-control" vs. market-oriented approaches to regulation, and the importance of expertise vs. indigenous knowledge. Its emphasis is placed on environmental planning techniques and strategies. Related topics include the management of sustainability, the politics of ecosystem management, environmental governance and the changing role of civil society, ecological economics, integrated assessment (combining environmental impact assessment (EIA) and risk assessment), joint fact finding in science-intensive policy disputes, environmental justice in poor communities of color, and environmental dispute resolution. This course is the first subject in the Environmental Policy and Planning sequence. It reviews philosophical debates including growth vs. deep ecology, "command-and-control" vs. market-oriented approaches to regulation, and the importance of expertise vs. indigenous knowledge. Its emphasis is placed on environmental planning techniques and strategies. Related topics include the management of sustainability, the politics of ecosystem management, environmental governance and the changing role of civil society, ecological economics, integrated assessment (combining environmental impact assessment (EIA) and risk assessment), joint fact finding in science-intensive policy disputes, environmental justice in poor communities of color, and environmental dispute resolution.

Subjects

Experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | Experimental investigations of speech processes. Topics: measurement of articulatory movements | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | measurements of pressures and airflows in speech production | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | computer-aided waveform analysis and spectral analysis of speech | synthesis of speech | synthesis of speech | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | perception and discrimination of speechlike sounds | speech prosody | speech prosody | models for speech recognition | models for speech recognition | speech disorders | speech disorders | other topics | other topics | environment | environment | environmental planning | environmental planning | environmental policy | environmental policy | ethics | ethics | land use planning | land use planning | environmental management | environmental management | growth | growth | scarcity | scarcity | command and control | command and control | market forces | market forces | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | deep ecology | deep ecology | expert knowledge | expert knowledge | indigeneous knowledge | indigeneous knowledge | land conservation | land conservation | sustainable design | sustainable design | growth management | growth management | hazard mitigation | hazard mitigation | ecosystem management | ecosystem management | geospatial data | geospatial data | stormwater management | stormwater management | runoff pollution | runoff pollution | landscape ecology | landscape ecology | biodiversity | biodiversity | integrated assessment | integrated assessment | professional practice | professional practice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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