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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course will provide an overview of macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are the public debt and international economic issues. It introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies. This course will provide an overview of macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are the public debt and international economic issues. It introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | the determination of output | the determination of output | employment | employment | unemployment | unemployment | interest rates | interest rates | inflation | inflation | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | as are the public debt and international economic issues | as are the public debt and international economic issues | the determination of output | employment | unemployment | interest rates | and inflation | the determination of output | employment | unemployment | interest rates | and inflation | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | as are the public debt and international economic issues | Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed | as are the public debt and international economic issues | Monetary policies | Monetary policies | Fiscal policies | Fiscal policies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT) 21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation. This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | China | rice | rice | bowl | bowl | Chinese | Chinese | East Asia | East Asia | ordinary people | ordinary people | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | personal narratives | primary sources | primary sources | films | films | textbook | textbook | individual | individual | family | family | lives | lives | change | change | modern | modern | readings | readings | discussions | discussions | political events | political events | daily | daily | decisions | decisions | large-scale | large-scale | social | social | transformation | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.191 | 21F.991 | 21F.991

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: 20th Century Irish Poetry: The Shadow of W. B. Yeats (MIT)

Description

William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well. William Butler Yeats occupies a dominant position in the lives and work of the Irish poets who followed him. We will explore some of that poetry, and consider how later poets, especially female poets, tried to come to grips with, or escape from, that dominance. As a seminar, the subject will place special emphasis on student involvement and control. I will ask you to submit one ten-twelve page essay, two shorter (five page) essays, and to accept the role of "leadoff person," perhaps more than once, That role will demand that you choose from among the assigned readings for that session the poem we should focus upon, and to offer either a provocative articulation of what the poem is about, or a provocative question which the poem confronts, and which we should grapple with, as well.

Subjects

W. B. Yeats | W. B. Yeats | William Butler Yeats | William Butler Yeats | Irish poetry | Irish poetry | poetry | poetry | female poets | female poets | Patrick Kavanagh | Patrick Kavanagh | Louis MacNeice | Louis MacNeice | John Hewitt | John Hewitt | Richard Murphy | Richard Murphy | John Montague | John Montague | Seamus Heaney | Seamus Heaney | Michael Hartnett | Michael Hartnett | Derek Mahon | Derek Mahon | Paul Durcan | Paul Durcan | Paul Muldoon | Paul Muldoon | Ciaran Carson | Ciaran Carson | Paula Meehan | Paula Meehan | Medbh McGuckian | Medbh McGuckian | Boland | Boland | Rita Ann Higgins | Rita Ann Higgins | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Cathleen ni Houlihan | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | Nuala ni Dhomhnaill | round table discussion | round table discussion | poetry discussion | poetry discussion | literary analysis | literary analysis

License

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21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT) 21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT) 7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT)

Description

The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an

Subjects

DNA | DNA | damage checkpoints | damage checkpoints | cancer | cancer | cells | cells | human cells | human cells | exogenous | exogenous | endogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | checkpoints | gene | gene | signaling | signaling | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer prevention | cancer prevention | primary sources | primary sources | discussion | discussion | DNA damage | DNA damage | molecular | molecular | enzyme | enzyme | cell cycle | cell cycle | extracellular cues | extracellular cues | growth factors | growth factors | Cdk regulation | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | p53 | tumor suppressor | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | apoptosis | MDC1 | MDC1 | H2AX | H2AX | Rad50 | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | Chk1 | mutant | mutant

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-1 Imagining the Future (MIT) 21W.730-1 Imagining the Future (MIT)

Description

Turn-of-the-century eras have historically been times when people are more than usually inclined to scrutinize the present and speculate about the future. Now, the turn not just of a century but of a millennium having recently passed, such scrutiny and speculations inevitably intensify. What will the future that awaits us in this twenty-first century and beyond be like? And how do visions of that future reflect and respond to the world we live in now? In this writing course we will read and write about how some twentieth-century writers and filmmakers have attended to the present as a way of imagining -- and warning about -- possible worlds to come. Guided by our reading and discussion, we will scrutinize our own present and construct our own visions of the future through close readings of Turn-of-the-century eras have historically been times when people are more than usually inclined to scrutinize the present and speculate about the future. Now, the turn not just of a century but of a millennium having recently passed, such scrutiny and speculations inevitably intensify. What will the future that awaits us in this twenty-first century and beyond be like? And how do visions of that future reflect and respond to the world we live in now? In this writing course we will read and write about how some twentieth-century writers and filmmakers have attended to the present as a way of imagining -- and warning about -- possible worlds to come. Guided by our reading and discussion, we will scrutinize our own present and construct our own visions of the future through close readings of

Subjects

Turn-of-the-century | Turn-of-the-century | eras | eras | present | present | future | future | millennium | millennium | twenty-first century | twenty-first century | visions | visions | imagination | imagination | world | world | writing | writing | read | read | twentieth-century | twentieth-century | writers | writers | filmmakers | filmmakers | imagining | imagining | warning | warning | discussion | discussion | contemporary | contemporary | culture | culture | urban | urban | environmental | environmental | crises | crises | economic | economic | imperialism | imperialism | sexual | sexual | reproductive | reproductive | politics | politics | race | race | gender | gender | romance | romance | technology | technology | robotics | robotics | cyborg | cyborg | media saturation | media saturation | language | language | representation | representation | human | human

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Jimmy Wales on Global free speech in the internet age

Description

Professor Timothy Garton Ash (Director of Free Speech Debate) interviews Jimmy Wales (Founder of Wikipedia) on the topic of global free speech and the internet. This was the launch event of Free Speech Debate and took place in Oxford on 19 Jan 2012. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

wiki | information | freespeechdebate | freedom | discussion | internet | wikipedia | free | speech | community | online | images | politics | debate | wiki | information | freespeechdebate | freedom | discussion | internet | wikipedia | free | speech | community | online | images | politics | debate | 2012-01-19

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Jimmy Wales on Global free speech in the internet age

Description

Professor Timothy Garton Ash (Director of Free Speech Debate) interviews Jimmy Wales (Founder of Wikipedia) on the topic of global free speech and the internet. This was the launch event of Free Speech Debate and took place in Oxford on 19 Jan 2012. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

wiki | information | freespeechdebate | freedom | discussion | internet | wikipedia | free | speech | community | online | images | politics | debate | wiki | information | freespeechdebate | freedom | discussion | internet | wikipedia | free | speech | community | online | images | politics | debate | 2012-01-19

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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4.341 Introduction to Photography (MIT) 4.341 Introduction to Photography (MIT)

Description

This course combines practical instruction, field trips, group discussions, and individual reviews intended to foster a critical awareness of how images in our culture are produced and constructed. Student-initiated term projects are at the core of this exploration of the relationship of image to language and issues of interpretation and personal history. Besides, this course also offers practical instruction in basic black and white techniques, digital imaging, fundamentals of camera operation, lighting, film exposure, development and printing. Course provides opportunity for continued exploration. This course combines practical instruction, field trips, group discussions, and individual reviews intended to foster a critical awareness of how images in our culture are produced and constructed. Student-initiated term projects are at the core of this exploration of the relationship of image to language and issues of interpretation and personal history. Besides, this course also offers practical instruction in basic black and white techniques, digital imaging, fundamentals of camera operation, lighting, film exposure, development and printing. Course provides opportunity for continued exploration.

Subjects

Practical instruction | Practical instruction | Field trips | Field trips | Group discussions | Group discussions | Individual reviews | Individual reviews | Images in our culture | Images in our culture | Photography | Photography | Visual arts program | Visual arts program

License

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7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT) 7.341 The DNA Damage Response as a Target for Anti-Cancer Therapy (MIT)

Description

Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching. Cellular responses to DNA damage constitute one of the most important fields in cancer biology. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understand of cell cycle regulation and DNA damage checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

DNA | DNA | damage checkpoints | damage checkpoints | cancer | cancer | cells | cells | human cells | human cells | exogenous | exogenous | endogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | checkpoints | gene | gene | signaling | signaling | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer prevention | cancer prevention | primary sources | primary sources | discussion | discussion | DNA damage | DNA damage | molecular | molecular | enzyme | enzyme | cell cycle | cell cycle | extracellular cues | extracellular cues | growth factors | growth factors | Cdk regulation | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | p53 | tumor suppressor | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | apoptosis | MDC1 | MDC1 | H2AX | H2AX | Rad50 | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | Chk1 | mutant | mutant

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.18 Topics in Experimental Biology (MIT) 7.18 Topics in Experimental Biology (MIT)

Description

This independent experimental study course is designed to allow students with a strong interest in independent research to fulfill the project laboratory requirement for the Biology Department Program in the context of a research laboratory at MIT. The research should be a continuation of a previous project under the direction of a member of the Biology Department faculty. This course provides instruction and practice in written and oral communication. Journal club discussions are used to help students evaluate and write scientific papers. This independent experimental study course is designed to allow students with a strong interest in independent research to fulfill the project laboratory requirement for the Biology Department Program in the context of a research laboratory at MIT. The research should be a continuation of a previous project under the direction of a member of the Biology Department faculty. This course provides instruction and practice in written and oral communication. Journal club discussions are used to help students evaluate and write scientific papers.

Subjects

experimental biology | experimental biology | journal club | journal club | primary literature | primary literature | scientific research | scientific research | oral presentations | oral presentations | communication | communication | abstracts | abstracts | materials and methods | materials and methods | discussion | discussion | IMRAD | IMRAD | research report | research report | laboratory research | laboratory research | results section | results section

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.02CI Experimental Biology - Communications Intensive (MIT) 7.02CI Experimental Biology - Communications Intensive (MIT)

Description

This course is the scientific communications portion of course 7.02, Experimental Biology and Communication. Students develop their skills as writers of scientific research, skills that also contribute to the learning of the 7.02 course materials. Through in class and out of class writing exercises, students explore the genre of the research article and its components while developing an understanding of the materials covered in the 7.02 laboratory. This course is the scientific communications portion of course 7.02, Experimental Biology and Communication. Students develop their skills as writers of scientific research, skills that also contribute to the learning of the 7.02 course materials. Through in class and out of class writing exercises, students explore the genre of the research article and its components while developing an understanding of the materials covered in the 7.02 laboratory.

Subjects

scientific writing | scientific writing | technical writing | technical writing | scientific communication | scientific communication | science writing | science writing | research article | research article | title | title | abstract | abstract | introduction | introduction | methods | methods | results | results | discussion | discussion | conclusion | conclusion | laboratory research paper | laboratory research paper | 7.02 | 7.02 | 10.702 | 10.702

License

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16.812 The Aerospace Industry (MIT) 16.812 The Aerospace Industry (MIT)

Description

This course meets weekly to discuss recent aerospace history and current events, in order to understand how they are responsible for the state of the aerospace industry. With invited subject matter experts participating in nearly every session, students have an opportunity to hone their insight through truly informed discussion. The aim of the course is to prepare junior and senior level students for their first industry experiences. This course meets weekly to discuss recent aerospace history and current events, in order to understand how they are responsible for the state of the aerospace industry. With invited subject matter experts participating in nearly every session, students have an opportunity to hone their insight through truly informed discussion. The aim of the course is to prepare junior and senior level students for their first industry experiences.

Subjects

aerospace industry | aerospace industry | current events | current events | lean | lean | lean enterprise | lean enterprise | lean aerospace initiative | lean aerospace initiative | aerospace history | aerospace history | value creation | value creation | reflective thinking | reflective thinking | career interests | career interests | class discussions | class discussions | student journal | student journal | evolution of aerospace | evolution of aerospace | cold war legacy | cold war legacy | lean thinking | lean thinking

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

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21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form. This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form.

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: Rewriting Genesis: "Paradise Lost" and Twentieth-Century Fantasy (MIT)

Description

What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work. What does the Genesis story of creation and temptation tell us about gender, about heterosexuality, and about the origins of evil? What is the nature of God, and how can we account for that nature in a cosmos where evil exists? When is rebellion justified, and when is authority legitimate? These are some of the key questions that engaged the poet John Milton, and that continue to engage readers of his work.

Subjects

Genesis | Genesis | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Twentieth-Centry Fantasy | Rewriting Genesis | Rewriting Genesis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: John Milton (MIT)

Description

In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au In 1667, John Milton published what he intended both as the crowning achievement of a poetic career and a justification of God's ways to man: an epic poem which retold and reimagined the Biblical story of creation, temptation, and original sin. Even in a hostile political climate, Paradise Lost was almost immediately recognized as a classic, and one fate of a classic is to be rewritten, both by admirers and by antagonists. In this seminar, we will read Paradise Lost alongside works of 20th century fantasy and science fiction which rethink both Milton's text and its source. Students should come to the seminar having read Paradise Lost straight through at least once; this can be accomplished by taking the IAP subject, Reading Paradise Lost (21L.995), or independently. Twentieth century au

Subjects

John Milton | John Milton | Paradise Lost | Paradise Lost | Renaissance literature | Renaissance literature | medieval literature | medieval literature | poetry | poetry | epic poetry | epic poetry | religious poetry | religious poetry | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary analysis | literary analysis | Philip Pullman | Philip Pullman | The Golden Compass | The Golden Compass | His Dark Materials | His Dark Materials | William Blake | William Blake | Biblical analysis | Biblical analysis | Bible | Bible | Genesis | Genesis | seminar course | seminar course | discussion | discussion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances. Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater. | theater.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.225 Advanced Workshop in Writing for Science and Engineering (ELS) (MIT) 21G.225 Advanced Workshop in Writing for Science and Engineering (ELS) (MIT)

Description

Analysis and practice of various forms of scientific and technical writing, from memos to journal articles. Strategies for conveying technical information to specialist and non-specialist audiences. Comparable to 21W.780 but methods designed to deal with special problems of advanced ELS or bilingual students. The goal of the workshop is to develop effective writing skills for academic and professional contexts. Models, materials, topics and assignments vary from semester to semester. Analysis and practice of various forms of scientific and technical writing, from memos to journal articles. Strategies for conveying technical information to specialist and non-specialist audiences. Comparable to 21W.780 but methods designed to deal with special problems of advanced ELS or bilingual students. The goal of the workshop is to develop effective writing skills for academic and professional contexts. Models, materials, topics and assignments vary from semester to semester.

Subjects

English | English | group discussion | group discussion | group analyses | group analyses | speaking exercise | speaking exercise | workshop | workshop | formal paper | formal paper | non-expert audience | non-expert audience | audience | audience | correspondence | correspondence | writing | writing | research proposal | research proposal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.106 Chinese VI (Regular): Discovering Chinese Cultures and Societies (MIT) 21G.106 Chinese VI (Regular): Discovering Chinese Cultures and Societies (MIT)

Description

This course is the continuation of 21G.105. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT and in the Boston area. Some special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin. This course is the continuation of 21G.105. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at MIT and in the Boston area. Some special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin.

Subjects

language | language | china | china | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | writing | writing | speaking | speaking | comprehension | comprehension | culture | culture | society | society | conversational skills | conversational skills | reading skills | reading skills | Chinese speaking societies | Chinese speaking societies | writing skills | writing skills | Chinese society | Chinese society | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese history | Chinese history | discussion | discussion | composition | composition | network exploration | network exploration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Society (MIT) Society (MIT)

Description

This course is the continuation of 21G.104/108. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at in the Boston area. Some of special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are be introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin. This course is the continuation of 21G.104/108. It is designed to further help students develop sophisticated conversational, reading and writing skills by combining traditional textbook material with their own explorations of Chinese speaking societies, using the human, literary, and electronic resources available at in the Boston area. Some of special features of Chinese society, its culture, its customs and habits, its history, and the psychology of its people are be introduced. The class consists of reading, discussion, composition, network exploration, and conversational practice. The course is conducted in Mandarin.

Subjects

chinese | chinese | language | language | mandarin | mandarin | reading | reading | conversation | conversation | writing | writing | culture | culture | china | china | society | society | custom | custom | conversational skills | conversational skills | reading skills | reading skills | Chinese speaking societies | Chinese speaking societies | writing skills | writing skills | Chinese society | Chinese society | Chinese culture | Chinese culture | Chinese customs | Chinese customs | Chinese history | Chinese history | discussion | discussion | composition | composition | network exploration | network exploration

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.907 Trials in History (MIT) 21H.907 Trials in History (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class. This seminar examines a number of famous trials in European and American history. It considers the salient issues (political, social, cultural) of several trials, the ways in which each trial was constructed and covered in public discussions at the time, the ways in which legal reasoning and storytelling interacted in each trial and in the later retellings of the trial, and the ways in which trials serve as both spectacle and a forum for moral and political reasoning. Students have an opportunity to study one trial in depth and present their findings to the class.

Subjects

Witchcraft | Witchcraft | Show Trials | Show Trials | Great Terror | Great Terror | French Revolution | French Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Bolshevik Revolution | Salem | Salem | Galileo | Galileo | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | Marie-Antoinette | Marie-Antoinette | Joan of Arc | Joan of Arc | Socrates | Socrates | Madame Caillaux | Madame Caillaux | Lenin | Lenin | Stalin | Stalin | Bukharin | Bukharin | Scopes | Scopes | Nuremberg | Nuremberg | moral reasoning | moral reasoning | political reasoning | political reasoning | criminal justice system | criminal justice system | public discussion | public discussion | legal system | legal system | legal reasoning | legal reasoning | storytelling | storytelling | evidence | evidence | interpretation | interpretation | law | law | society | society | social issues | social issues | public discourse | public discourse | narrative | narrative | dissenters | dissenters | transitional justice | transitional justice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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How we won the Bid

Description

For the British people, Wednesday 6th July, 2005, was a momentous and historic day. That was the day that Britain was awarded the right to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games in 2012. Such an announcement transformed the image of Britain as a nation capable of hosting large scale sporting mega-events.

Subjects

UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | cc-by | creative commons | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | discussion starter | discuss | Winning bid | mega event | event management | politicians | media | media management | legacy | volunteers | oxb:060111:010dd | hospitality | leisure | sport | tourism | Team GB | The Olympics Governance Management.

License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource.

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