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9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT) 9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

Course topics explore the relations between neural systems and cognition, emphasizing attention, vision, language, motor control, and memory. An introduction to basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition is given with discussion of methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. Evidence from patients with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke is given as well as from normal human participants. Course topics explore the relations between neural systems and cognition, emphasizing attention, vision, language, motor control, and memory. An introduction to basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition is given with discussion of methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. Evidence from patients with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke is given as well as from normal human participants.

Subjects

emphasizing attention | emphasizing attention | vision | vision | language | language | motor control | motor control | memory | memory | functional imaging techniques | functional imaging techniques | cognition | cognition | neurological diseases | neurological diseases | Alzheimer's disease | Alzheimer's disease | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Huntington's disease | Huntington's disease | Balint's syndrome | Balint's syndrome | amnesia | amnesia | focal lesions | focal lesions | stroke | stroke

License

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9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT) 9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

Explores the relations between neural systems and cognition, emphasizing attention, vision, language, motor control, and memory. Introduces basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition. Discusses methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. Considers evidence from patients with neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke) and from normal human participants. An additional project is required for graduate credit. Alternate years. Explores the relations between neural systems and cognition, emphasizing attention, vision, language, motor control, and memory. Introduces basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition. Discusses methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. Considers evidence from patients with neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke) and from normal human participants. An additional project is required for graduate credit. Alternate years.

Subjects

emphasizing attention | emphasizing attention | vision | vision | language | language | motor control | motor control | memory | memory | functional imaging techniques | functional imaging techniques | cognition | cognition | neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease) | neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease) | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Huntington's disease | Huntington's disease | Balint's syndrome | Balint's syndrome | amnesia | amnesia | focal lesions from stroke | focal lesions from stroke

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.27 Principles of Human Disease (MIT) 7.27 Principles of Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course covers current understanding of, and modern approaches to human disease, emphasizing the molecular and cellular basis of both genetic disease and cancer. Topics include: The Genetics of Simple and Complex Traits; Karyotypic Analysis and Positional Cloning; Genetic Diagnosis; The Roles of Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors in Tumor Initiation, Progression, and Treatment; The Interaction between Genetics and Environment; Animal Models of Human Disease; Cancer; and Conventional and Gene Therapy Treatment Strategies. This course covers current understanding of, and modern approaches to human disease, emphasizing the molecular and cellular basis of both genetic disease and cancer. Topics include: The Genetics of Simple and Complex Traits; Karyotypic Analysis and Positional Cloning; Genetic Diagnosis; The Roles of Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors in Tumor Initiation, Progression, and Treatment; The Interaction between Genetics and Environment; Animal Models of Human Disease; Cancer; and Conventional and Gene Therapy Treatment Strategies.

Subjects

human disease | human disease | molecular basis of genetic disease | molecular basis of genetic disease | molecular basis of cancer | molecular basis of cancer | cellular basis of genetic disease | cellular basis of genetic disease | cellular basis of cancer | cellular basis of cancer | genetics of simple and complex traits | genetics of simple and complex traits | karyotypic analysis | karyotypic analysis | positional cloning | positional cloning | genetic diagnosis | genetic diagnosis | roles of oncogenes | roles of oncogenes | tumor suppressors | tumor suppressors | tumor initiation | tumor initiation | tumor progression | tumor progression | tumor treatment | tumor treatment | interaction between genetics and environment | interaction between genetics and environment | animal models of human disease | animal models of human disease | cancer | cancer | conventional treatment strategies | conventional treatment strategies | gene therapy treatment strategies | gene therapy treatment strategies

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9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT) 9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

This course explores the cognitive and neural processes that support attention, vision, language, motor control, navigation, and memory. It introduces basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition, and discusses methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. We consider evidence from patients with neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke) and from normal human participants. This course explores the cognitive and neural processes that support attention, vision, language, motor control, navigation, and memory. It introduces basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition, and discusses methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. We consider evidence from patients with neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke) and from normal human participants.

Subjects

emphasizing attention | emphasizing attention | vision | vision | language | language | motor control | motor control | memory | memory | functional imaging techniques | functional imaging techniques | cognition | cognition | neurological diseases | neurological diseases | Alzheimer's disease | Alzheimer's disease | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Huntington's disease | Huntington's disease | Balint's syndrome | Balint's syndrome | amnesia | amnesia | focal lesions | focal lesions | stroke | stroke

License

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7.88J Protein Folding and Human Disease (MIT) 7.88J Protein Folding and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course covers amino acid sequence control of protein folding, misfolding, amyloid polymerization and aggregation. Readings and discussions address topics such as chaperone structure and function, folding and assembly of fibrous proteins, and pathologies associated with protein misfolding and aggregation in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and other protein deposition diseases. Students are required to write and present a research paper. This course covers amino acid sequence control of protein folding, misfolding, amyloid polymerization and aggregation. Readings and discussions address topics such as chaperone structure and function, folding and assembly of fibrous proteins, and pathologies associated with protein misfolding and aggregation in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and other protein deposition diseases. Students are required to write and present a research paper.

Subjects

protein folding | protein folding | misfolding | misfolding | aggregation | aggregation | protein structures | protein structures | folding intermediates | folding intermediates | off-pathway aggregation | off-pathway aggregation | amyloid formation | amyloid formation | Key chaperones | Key chaperones | chaperonins | chaperonins | human protein deposition diseases | human protein deposition diseases | Alzheimer’s disease | Alzheimer’s disease | Parkinson’s disease | Parkinson’s disease | Huntington’s disease | Huntington’s disease | amyloids | amyloids | prions | prions | amino acid sequence | amino acid sequence | amyloid polymerization | amyloid polymerization | chaperone structure and function | chaperone structure and function | folding and assembly of fibrous proteins | folding and assembly of fibrous proteins

License

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7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material.7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer),

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

License

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7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In addition, each version of the subject has its own distinctive material. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer),

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT) 7.013 Introductory Biology (MIT)

Description

The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), developmental biology, neurobiology and evolution.Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized in all courses and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In add The MIT Biology Department core courses, 7.012, 7.013, and 7.014, all cover the same core material, which includes the fundamental principles of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. 7.013 focuses on the application of the fundamental principles toward an understanding of human biology. Topics include genetics, cell biology, molecular biology, disease (infectious agents, inherited diseases and cancer), developmental biology, neurobiology and evolution.Biological function at the molecular level is particularly emphasized in all courses and covers the structure and regulation of genes, as well as, the structure and synthesis of proteins, how these molecules are integrated into cells, and how these cells are integrated into multicellular systems and organisms. In add

Subjects

biology | biology | biochemistry | biochemistry | genetics | genetics | molecular biology | molecular biology | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | cell cycle | cell cycle | cell signaling | cell signaling | cloning | cloning | stem cells | stem cells | cancer | cancer | immunology | immunology | virology | virology | genomics | genomics | molecular medicine | molecular medicine | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | proteins | proteins | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | mRNA | mRNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | nervous system | nervous system | amino acids | amino acids | polypeptide chain | polypeptide chain | cell biology | cell biology | neurobiology | neurobiology | gene regulation | gene regulation | protein structure | protein structure | protein synthesis | protein synthesis | gene structure | gene structure | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | protein localization | protein localization | endoplasmic reticulum | endoplasmic reticulum | human biology | human biology | inherited diseases | inherited diseases | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | human genetics | human genetics | human diseases | human diseases | infectious agents | infectious agents | infectious diseases | infectious diseases

License

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7.345 Using Simple Organisms to Model Human Diseases (MIT) 7.345 Using Simple Organisms to Model Human Diseases (MIT)

Description

How do scientists discover the basic biology underlying human diseases? Simple organisms such as baker’s yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, mice and rats have allowed biologists to investigate disease at multiple levels, from molecules to behavior. In this course students will learn strategies of disease modeling by critically reading and discussing primary research articles. We will explore current models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, childhood genetic diseases such as Fragile X syndrome, as well as models of deafness and wound healing. Our goal will be to understand the strategies biologists use to build appropriate models of human disease and to appreciate both the power and limitations of using simple organisms to analyze human disease. T How do scientists discover the basic biology underlying human diseases? Simple organisms such as baker’s yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, mice and rats have allowed biologists to investigate disease at multiple levels, from molecules to behavior. In this course students will learn strategies of disease modeling by critically reading and discussing primary research articles. We will explore current models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, childhood genetic diseases such as Fragile X syndrome, as well as models of deafness and wound healing. Our goal will be to understand the strategies biologists use to build appropriate models of human disease and to appreciate both the power and limitations of using simple organisms to analyze human disease. T

Subjects

human disease | human disease | yeast | yeast | nematodes | nematodes | fruit flies | fruit flies | zebrafish | zebrafish | mice | mice | rats | rats | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Fragile X syndrome | Fragile X syndrome | deafness | deafness | wound healing | wound healing | experimental organisms | experimental organisms | genetic models | genetic models | Huntington's disease | Huntington's disease | Drosophila melanogaster | Drosophila melanogaster

License

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7.342 Powerhouse Rules: The Role of Mitochondria in Human Diseases (MIT) 7.342 Powerhouse Rules: The Role of Mitochondria in Human Diseases (MIT)

Description

The primary role of mitochondria is to produce 90% of a cell's energy in the form of ATP through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. A variety of clinical disorders have been shown to include "mitochondrial dysfunction," which loosely refers to defective oxidative phosphorylation and usually coincides with the occurrence of excess Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production, placing cells under oxidative stress. A known cause and effect of oxidative stress is damage to and mutation of mitochondrial DNA. We will use this class to explore issues relating to mitochondrial DNA integrity and how it can be damaged, repaired, mutated, and compromised in human diseases. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These semi The primary role of mitochondria is to produce 90% of a cell's energy in the form of ATP through a process called oxidative phosphorylation. A variety of clinical disorders have been shown to include "mitochondrial dysfunction," which loosely refers to defective oxidative phosphorylation and usually coincides with the occurrence of excess Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production, placing cells under oxidative stress. A known cause and effect of oxidative stress is damage to and mutation of mitochondrial DNA. We will use this class to explore issues relating to mitochondrial DNA integrity and how it can be damaged, repaired, mutated, and compromised in human diseases. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These semi

Subjects

mitochondria | mitochondria | human disease | human disease | ATP | ATP | oxidative phosphorylation | oxidative phosphorylation | mitochondrial genome | mitochondrial genome | Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) | Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) | mitochondrial dysfunction | mitochondrial dysfunction | oxidative stress | 8-oxoguanine | oxidative stress | 8-oxoguanine | 8-oxoG | 8-oxoG | mtDNA | mtDNA | Ogg1 | Ogg1 | Oxoguanine glycosylase | Oxoguanine glycosylase | mitochondrial DNA polymerase | mitochondrial DNA polymerase | Alzheimer’s disease | Alzheimer’s disease | Parkinson’s disease | Parkinson’s disease | Y955C | Y955C | Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes | Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes

License

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9.110J Neurology, Neuropsychology, and Neurobiology of Aging (MIT) 9.110J Neurology, Neuropsychology, and Neurobiology of Aging (MIT)

Description

Lectures and discussions in this course cover the clinical, behavioral, and molecular aspects of the brain aging processes in humans. Topics include the loss of memory and other cognitive abilities in normal aging, as well as neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Discussions based on readings taken from primary literature explore the current research in this field. Lectures and discussions in this course cover the clinical, behavioral, and molecular aspects of the brain aging processes in humans. Topics include the loss of memory and other cognitive abilities in normal aging, as well as neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Discussions based on readings taken from primary literature explore the current research in this field.

Subjects

aging | aging | memory loss | memory loss | cognition | cognition | neurodegeneration | neurodegeneration | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Alzheimer's disease | Alzheimer's disease | aging brain | aging brain | neurobiology | neurobiology | neurology | neurology | neuropsychology | neuropsychology | brain atrophy | brain atrophy | learning | learning | memory | memory | recollection | recollection | emotional memory | emotional memory | implicit memory | implicit memory | Huntington's disease | Huntington's disease | working memory | working memory | dementia | dementia

License

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SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.718 Special Topics at Edgerton Center: D-Lab Health: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides multi-disciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break and work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address the challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | co-creation | co-creation | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | medical ethics | medical ethics | infant mortality | infant mortality

License

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STS.330 History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT) STS.330 History and Anthropology of Medicine and Biology (MIT)

Description

This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of medicine and biology. Topics include histories of bodies and embodiment in medicine; institutional and social genealogies and futures for genes and genomes; the role of science and medicine in racial formation; epidemics and emergent diseases; new reproductive technologies and socialities; the laboratory and field lives of animals, plants, microbes, molecules, and environments. This course explores recent historical and anthropological approaches to the study of medicine and biology. Topics include histories of bodies and embodiment in medicine; institutional and social genealogies and futures for genes and genomes; the role of science and medicine in racial formation; epidemics and emergent diseases; new reproductive technologies and socialities; the laboratory and field lives of animals, plants, microbes, molecules, and environments.

Subjects

historical medicine | historical medicine | medieval dissection | medieval dissection | gender | gender | visible human project | visible human project | genealogies | genealogies | genome | genome | biological kinship | biological kinship | biology of race | biology of race | race and disease | race and disease | emerging diseases | emerging diseases | human relationship with animals | human relationship with animals | reproductive technologies | reproductive technologies | therapeutics | therapeutics | bioprospecting | bioprospecting | climate change | climate change | environmental technology | environmental technology

License

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BE.102 Macroepidemiology (MIT) BE.102 Macroepidemiology (MIT)

Description

This course presents a challenging multi-dimensional perspective on the causes of human disease and mortality. The course focuses on analyses of major causes of mortality in the US since 1900: cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, and infectious diseases. Students create analytical models to derive estimates for historically variant population risk factors and physiological rate parameters, and conduct analyses of familial data to separately estimate inherited and environmental risks. The course evaluates the basic population genetics of dominant, recessive and non-deleterious inherited risk factors. Technical RequirementsJava® plug-in software is required to run the Java® files found on this course site. Microsoft® Excel s This course presents a challenging multi-dimensional perspective on the causes of human disease and mortality. The course focuses on analyses of major causes of mortality in the US since 1900: cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, and infectious diseases. Students create analytical models to derive estimates for historically variant population risk factors and physiological rate parameters, and conduct analyses of familial data to separately estimate inherited and environmental risks. The course evaluates the basic population genetics of dominant, recessive and non-deleterious inherited risk factors. Technical RequirementsJava® plug-in software is required to run the Java® files found on this course site. Microsoft® Excel s

Subjects

Disease | Disease | mortality | mortality | cancer | cancer | cerebrovascular disease | cerebrovascular disease | diabetes | diabetes | infectious disease | infectious disease | risk | risk | inherited risk | inherited risk | environmental risk | environmental risk | population genetics | population genetics | mutation | mutation | public health | public health | malignancy | malignancy | statistics | statistics

License

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9.110J Neurology, Neuropsychology, and Neurobiology of Aging (MIT) 9.110J Neurology, Neuropsychology, and Neurobiology of Aging (MIT)

Description

Lectures and discussions explore the clinical, behavioral, and molecular aspects of brain aging processes in humans. Topics include: loss of memory and other cognitive abilities in normal aging; neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Based on lectures, readings taken from the primary literature, and discussions. Students are expected to present topics based on their readings. Lectures and discussions explore the clinical, behavioral, and molecular aspects of brain aging processes in humans. Topics include: loss of memory and other cognitive abilities in normal aging; neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Based on lectures, readings taken from the primary literature, and discussions. Students are expected to present topics based on their readings.

Subjects

clinical | clinical | behavioral | behavioral | molecular aspects of brain | molecular aspects of brain | aging | aging | humans | humans | loss of memory | loss of memory | cognition | cognition | neurodegeneration | neurodegeneration | Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | Alzheimer's disease | Alzheimer's disease | 9.110 | 9.110 | 7.92 | 7.92

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7.340 Unusual Biology: The Science of Emerging Pathogens (MIT) 7.340 Unusual Biology: The Science of Emerging Pathogens (MIT)

Description

Infectious diseases represent a serious global public health problem. They have the potential to kill millions of people, whether they emerge naturally as outbreaks or pandemics, or deliberately through bioterrorism. Some examples of diseases caused by emerging pathogens are the Bubonic Plague, Toxoplasmosis, African Sleeping Sickness, and Chagas Disease. Each day, infectious disease scientists serve on the front lines protecting us from such threats. In this course students will learn how to design and critique experiments through the discussion of primary research articles that explore the molecular basis of disease caused by emerging pathogens. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students w Infectious diseases represent a serious global public health problem. They have the potential to kill millions of people, whether they emerge naturally as outbreaks or pandemics, or deliberately through bioterrorism. Some examples of diseases caused by emerging pathogens are the Bubonic Plague, Toxoplasmosis, African Sleeping Sickness, and Chagas Disease. Each day, infectious disease scientists serve on the front lines protecting us from such threats. In this course students will learn how to design and critique experiments through the discussion of primary research articles that explore the molecular basis of disease caused by emerging pathogens. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students w

Subjects

pathogens | pathogens | Infectious diseases | Infectious diseases | parasite | parasite | host cell | host cell | gene expression | gene expression | Toxoplasma rhoptry protein 16 (ROP16) | Toxoplasma rhoptry protein 16 (ROP16) | Toxoplasma gondii | Toxoplasma gondii | STAT6 | STAT6 | Plasmodium falciparum | Plasmodium falciparum | malaria | malaria | RON8 | RON8 | Trypanosoma cruzi | Trypanosoma cruzi | Chagas disease | Chagas disease | Listeria monocytogenes | Listeria monocytogenes | Leishmaniasis | Leishmaniasis | Francisella | Francisella | pathogen proliferation | pathogen proliferation

License

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7.342 The Biology of Aging: Age-Related Diseases and Interventions (MIT) 7.342 The Biology of Aging: Age-Related Diseases and Interventions (MIT)

Description

Aging involves an intrinsic and progressive decline in function that eventually will affect us all. While everyone is familiar with aging, many basic questions about aging are mysterious. Why are older people more likely to experience diseases like cancer, stroke, and neurodegenerative disorders? What changes happen at the molecular and cellular levels to cause the changes that we associate with old age? Is aging itself a disease, and can we successfully intervene in the aging process?This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Ad Aging involves an intrinsic and progressive decline in function that eventually will affect us all. While everyone is familiar with aging, many basic questions about aging are mysterious. Why are older people more likely to experience diseases like cancer, stroke, and neurodegenerative disorders? What changes happen at the molecular and cellular levels to cause the changes that we associate with old age? Is aging itself a disease, and can we successfully intervene in the aging process?This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Ad

Subjects

Aging | Aging | age-related diseases | age-related diseases | molecular biology of aging | molecular biology of aging | calorie restriction | calorie restriction | resveratrol | resveratrol | rapamycin | rapamycin | Caloric restriction (CR) | Caloric restriction (CR) | Cellular senescence | Cellular senescence | telomerase | telomerase | progeroid syndromes | progeroid syndromes | mitochondrial DNA | mitochondrial DNA | yeast | yeast | C. elegans | C. elegans | Drosophila | Drosophila | Sirtuins | Sirtuins | SIR4 | SIR4 | target of rapamycin (TOR) | target of rapamycin (TOR) | oxidative damage | oxidative damage | Reactive oxygen species (ROS) | Reactive oxygen species (ROS) | National Institute on Aging Interventions Testing Program | National Institute on Aging Interventions Testing Program | Alzheimer’s disease | Alzheimer’s disease

License

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9.458 Parkinson's Disease Workshop (MIT) 9.458 Parkinson's Disease Workshop (MIT)

Description

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, degenerative disease of the brain that produces movement disorders and deficits in executive functions, working memory, visuospatial functions, and internal control of attention. It is named after James Parkinson (1755-1824), the English neurologist who described the first case. This six-week summer workshop explored different aspects of PD, including clinical characteristics, structural neuroimaging, neuropathology, genetics, and cognitive function (mental status, cognitive control processes, working memory, and long-term declarative memory).  The workshop did not take up the topics of motor control, nondeclarative memory, or treatment.  Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive, degenerative disease of the brain that produces movement disorders and deficits in executive functions, working memory, visuospatial functions, and internal control of attention. It is named after James Parkinson (1755-1824), the English neurologist who described the first case. This six-week summer workshop explored different aspects of PD, including clinical characteristics, structural neuroimaging, neuropathology, genetics, and cognitive function (mental status, cognitive control processes, working memory, and long-term declarative memory).  The workshop did not take up the topics of motor control, nondeclarative memory, or treatment. 

Subjects

Parkinson's disease | Parkinson's disease | chronic progressive degenerative disease | chronic progressive degenerative disease | central nervous system | central nervous system | movement disorders | movement disorders | executive functions | executive functions | working memory | working memory | visuospatial functions | visuospatial functions | internal control of attention | internal control of attention | James Parkinson | James Parkinson | neurologist | neurologist | pathogenic mechanisms | pathogenic mechanisms | positron emission tomography (PET) | positron emission tomography (PET) | structural and functional high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) | structural and functional high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

License

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20.102 Macroepidemiology (BE.102) (MIT) 20.102 Macroepidemiology (BE.102) (MIT)

Description

This course presents a challenging multi-dimensional perspective on the causes of human disease and mortality. The course focuses on analyses of major causes of mortality in the US since 1900: cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, and infectious diseases. Students create analytical models to derive estimates for historically variant population risk factors and physiological rate parameters, and conduct analyses of familial data to separately estimate inherited and environmental risks. The course evaluates the basic population genetics of dominant, recessive and non-deleterious inherited risk factors. This course presents a challenging multi-dimensional perspective on the causes of human disease and mortality. The course focuses on analyses of major causes of mortality in the US since 1900: cancer, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, and infectious diseases. Students create analytical models to derive estimates for historically variant population risk factors and physiological rate parameters, and conduct analyses of familial data to separately estimate inherited and environmental risks. The course evaluates the basic population genetics of dominant, recessive and non-deleterious inherited risk factors.

Subjects

Disease | Disease | mortality | mortality | cancer | cancer | cerebrovascular disease | cerebrovascular disease | diabetes | diabetes | infectious disease | infectious disease | risk | risk | inherited risk | inherited risk | environmental risk | environmental risk | population genetics | population genetics | mutation | mutation | public health | public health | malignancy | malignancy | statistics | statistics

License

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21A.215 Disease and Health: Culture, Society, and Ethics (MIT) 21A.215 Disease and Health: Culture, Society, and Ethics (MIT)

Description

This course examines how medicine is practiced cross-culturally, with particular emphasis on Western biomedicine. Students analyze medical practice as a cultural system, focusing on the human, as opposed to the biological, side of things. Also considered is how people in different cultures think of disease, health, body, and mind. This course examines how medicine is practiced cross-culturally, with particular emphasis on Western biomedicine. Students analyze medical practice as a cultural system, focusing on the human, as opposed to the biological, side of things. Also considered is how people in different cultures think of disease, health, body, and mind.

Subjects

history of medicine | history of medicine | sickness | sickness | healing | healing | disease causation | disease causation | beliefs | beliefs | disease treatment | disease treatment | institutions of medicine | institutions of medicine

License

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SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT) SP.725 D-Lab: Medical Technologies for the Developing World (MIT)

Description

D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing. D-Lab Health provides a multidisciplinary approach to global health technology design via guest lectures and a major project based on fieldwork. We will explore the current state of global health challenges and learn how to design medical technologies that address those problems. Students may travel to Nicaragua during spring break to work with health professionals, using medical technology design kits to gain field experience for their device challenge. As a final class deliverable, you will create a product design solution to address challenges observed in the field. The resulting designs are prototyped in the summer for continued evaluation and testing.

Subjects

global health | global health | medicine | medicine | developing nation | developing nation | third world | third world | disease | disease | disease prevention | disease prevention | vaccine | vaccine | immunization | immunization | drug | drug | health diagnostic | health diagnostic | medical informatics | medical informatics | appropriate technology | appropriate technology | sustainable development | sustainable development | inequality | inequality | poverty | poverty | poor | poor | medical device | medical device | medical device design | medical device design | innovation | innovation | prototyping | prototyping | co-creation | co-creation

License

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STS.005 Disease and Society in America (MIT) STS.005 Disease and Society in America (MIT)

Description

This course examines the growing importance of medicine in culture, economics and politics. It uses an historical approach to examine the changing patterns of disease, the causes of morbidity and mortality, the evolution of medical theory and practice, the development of hospitals and the medical profession, the rise of the biomedical research industry, and the ethics of health care in America. This course examines the growing importance of medicine in culture, economics and politics. It uses an historical approach to examine the changing patterns of disease, the causes of morbidity and mortality, the evolution of medical theory and practice, the development of hospitals and the medical profession, the rise of the biomedical research industry, and the ethics of health care in America.

Subjects

Science | Science | technology | technology | society | society | disease | disease | America | America | health | health | life | life | smallpox | smallpox | tuberculosis | tuberculosis | obesity | obesity | heart disease | heart disease | mental illness | mental illness | medicine | medicine | culture | culture | economics | economics | politics | politics | Health care | Health care | historical approach | historical approach | morbidity | morbidity | mortality | mortality | medical theory | medical theory | practice | practice | hospitals | hospitals | biomedical | biomedical | research | research | industry | industry | ethics | ethics

License

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9.10 Cognitive Neuroscience (MIT)

Description

This course explores the cognitive and neural processes that support attention, vision, language, motor control, navigation, and memory. It introduces basic neuroanatomy, functional imaging techniques, and behavioral measures of cognition, and discusses methods by which inferences about the brain bases of cognition are made. We consider evidence from patients with neurological diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Balint's syndrome, amnesia, and focal lesions from stroke) and from normal human participants.

Subjects

emphasizing attention | vision | language | motor control | memory | functional imaging techniques | cognition | neurological diseases | Alzheimer's disease | Parkinson's disease | Huntington's disease | Balint's syndrome | amnesia | focal lesions | stroke

License

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Chromatin Remodelling

Description

Dr Erika Mancini explains how malfunctions in the regulation of chromatin structure often leads to complex multi-system diseases and cancer, notably leukemia. Dr Erika Mancini is interested in the role of chromatin in the regulation of gene transcription. All our cells contain the same set of genes, but only some of them are transcribed at any point in a particular tissue. Regulation of gene transcription is strongly linked to chromatin, physical packaging of the DNA within the nucleus. Molecular Mechanisms influencing DNA packaging Chromatin plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. The movement of nucleosomes, packing and unpacking DNA, is governed by chromatin remodelling ATPases. Malfunctions in the regulation of chromatin structure often leads to complex multi-sy Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

disease | leukemia | chromatin remodelling | transcription regulation | Medicine | gene | heart diseases | disease | leukemia | chromatin remodelling | transcription regulation | Medicine | gene | heart diseases

License

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Chromatin Remodelling

Description

Dr Erika Mancini explains how malfunctions in the regulation of chromatin structure often leads to complex multi-system diseases and cancer, notably leukemia. Dr Erika Mancini is interested in the role of chromatin in the regulation of gene transcription. All our cells contain the same set of genes, but only some of them are transcribed at any point in a particular tissue. Regulation of gene transcription is strongly linked to chromatin, physical packaging of the DNA within the nucleus. Molecular Mechanisms influencing DNA packaging Chromatin plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. The movement of nucleosomes, packing and unpacking DNA, is governed by chromatin remodelling ATPases. Malfunctions in the regulation of chromatin structure often leads to complex multi-sy Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

disease | leukemia | chromatin remodelling | transcription regulation | Medicine | gene | heart diseases | disease | leukemia | chromatin remodelling | transcription regulation | Medicine | gene | heart diseases

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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