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8.592 Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT) 8.592 Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)

Description

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; Considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.Technical RequirementsAny number of biological sequence comparison software tools can be used to import the .fna files found on this course site. Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; Considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.Technical RequirementsAny number of biological sequence comparison software tools can be used to import the .fna files found on this course site.

Subjects

Bioinformatics | Bioinformatics | DNA | DNA | gene finding | gene finding | sequence comparison | sequence comparison | phylogenetic trees | phylogenetic trees | biopolymers | biopolymers | DNA double helix | DNA double helix | secondary structure of RNA | secondary structure of RNA | protein folding | protein folding | protein motors | membranes | protein motors | membranes | cellular networks | cellular networks | neural networks | neural networks | evolution | evolution | statistical physics | statistical physics | molecular biology | molecular biology | deoxyribonucleic acid | deoxyribonucleic acid | genes | genes | genetics | genetics | gene sequencing | gene sequencing | phylogenetics | phylogenetics | double helix | double helix | RNA | RNA | ribonucleic acid | ribonucleic acid | force | force | motion | motion | packaging | packaging | protein motors | protein motors | membranes | membranes | biochemistry | biochemistry | genome | genome | optimization | optimization | partitioning | partitioning | pattern recognition | pattern recognition | collective behavior | collective behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT) 7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials. Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | nucleic acids | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | genetics | genetics | genes | genes | genetic material | genetic material | double helix | double helix | molecular biology | molecular biology | biotechnology | biotechnology | structure | structure | function | function | heredity | heredity | complementarity | complementarity | biological materials | biological materials | genetic code | genetic code | oligonucleotides | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | polyribosome | tRNA | tRNA | reverse transcription | reverse transcription | central dogma | central dogma | transcription | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.03 Genetics (MIT) 7.03 Genetics (MIT)

Description

This course discusses the principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. The topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease. This course discusses the principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. The topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease.

Subjects

genetics | genetics | gene | gene | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | mutation | mutation | genome | genome | Watson and Crick | Watson and Crick | replication | replication | transcription | transcription | DNA heliz | DNA heliz | double helix | double helix | mRNA | mRNA | messenger RNA | messenger RNA | translation | translation | ribosome | ribosome | promoter | promoter | genetic analysis | genetic analysis | alleles | alleles | genotype | genotype | wild type | wild type | phenotype | phenotype | haploid | haploid | diploid | diploid | auxotrophic mutation | auxotrophic mutation | homozygous | homozygous | heterozygous | heterozygous | recessive allele | recessive allele | dominant allele | dominant allele | complementation test | complementation test | locus | locus | incomplete dominance | incomplete dominance | incomplete penetrance | incomplete penetrance | true-breeding | true-breeding | gametes | gametes | codominant | codominant | meiosis | meiosis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT) 8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)

Description

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution. Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.

Subjects

8.592 | 8.592 | HST.452 | HST.452 | Statistical physics | Statistical physics | Bioinformatics | Bioinformatics | DNA | DNA | gene finding | gene finding | sequence comparison | sequence comparison | phylogenetic trees | phylogenetic trees | biopolymers | biopolymers | DNA double helix | DNA double helix | secondary structure of RNA | secondary structure of RNA | protein folding | protein folding | protein motors | protein motors | membranes | membranes | cellular networks | cellular networks | neural networks | neural networks | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT) 8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)

Description

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution. Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.

Subjects

Bioinformatics | Bioinformatics | DNA | DNA | gene finding | gene finding | sequence comparison | sequence comparison | phylogenetic trees | phylogenetic trees | biopolymers | biopolymers | DNA double helix | DNA double helix | secondary structure of RNA | secondary structure of RNA | protein folding | protein folding | protein motors | protein motors | membranes | membranes | cellular networks | cellular networks | neural networks | neural networks | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.72 Capitalism and Its Critics (MIT) 14.72 Capitalism and Its Critics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the implications of economic theories for social and political organization in the context of the historical evolution of industrial societies. Among the authors whose theories will be discussed are Ayn Rand, Milton Friedman, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Joseph Schumpeter, and John Kenneth Galbraith. Emphasis will be placed on class discussion of specific texts. Students will be encouraged to ground their views in concrete textual and empirical material and to consider the implications of different arguments for the understanding of personal, political, and economic events today. This course examines the implications of economic theories for social and political organization in the context of the historical evolution of industrial societies. Among the authors whose theories will be discussed are Ayn Rand, Milton Friedman, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Joseph Schumpeter, and John Kenneth Galbraith. Emphasis will be placed on class discussion of specific texts. Students will be encouraged to ground their views in concrete textual and empirical material and to consider the implications of different arguments for the understanding of personal, political, and economic events today.

Subjects

Liberealism | Liberealism | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | Marxism | Marxism | corporate state | corporate state | social embeddedness | social embeddedness | ayn rand | ayn rand | industrial state | industrial state | rawls | rawls | communist manifesto | communist manifesto | capital | capital | civic republicanism | civic republicanism | Keynes | Keynes | arendt | arendt | the double helix | the double helix

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.592 Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)

Description

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; Considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.Technical RequirementsAny number of biological sequence comparison software tools can be used to import the .fna files found on this course site.

Subjects

Bioinformatics | DNA | gene finding | sequence comparison | phylogenetic trees | biopolymers | DNA double helix | secondary structure of RNA | protein folding | protein motors | membranes | cellular networks | neural networks | evolution | statistical physics | molecular biology | deoxyribonucleic acid | genes | genetics | gene sequencing | phylogenetics | double helix | RNA | ribonucleic acid | force | motion | packaging | protein motors | membranes | biochemistry | genome | optimization | partitioning | pattern recognition | collective behavior

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.72 Capitalism and Its Critics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the implications of economic theories for social and political organization in the context of the historical evolution of industrial societies. Among the authors whose theories will be discussed are Ayn Rand, Milton Friedman, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Joseph Schumpeter, and John Kenneth Galbraith. Emphasis will be placed on class discussion of specific texts. Students will be encouraged to ground their views in concrete textual and empirical material and to consider the implications of different arguments for the understanding of personal, political, and economic events today.

Subjects

Liberealism | neoclassical economics | Marxism | corporate state | social embeddedness | ayn rand | industrial state | rawls | communist manifesto | capital | civic republicanism | Keynes | arendt | the double helix

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.72 Capitalism and Its Critics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the implications of economic theories for social and political organization in the context of the historical evolution of industrial societies. Among the authors whose theories will be discussed are Ayn Rand, Milton Friedman, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Joseph Schumpeter, and John Kenneth Galbraith. Emphasis will be placed on class discussion of specific texts. Students will be encouraged to ground their views in concrete textual and empirical material and to consider the implications of different arguments for the understanding of personal, political, and economic events today.

Subjects

Liberealism | neoclassical economics | Marxism | corporate state | social embeddedness | ayn rand | industrial state | rawls | communist manifesto | capital | civic republicanism | Keynes | arendt | the double helix

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)

Description

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.

Subjects

Bioinformatics | DNA | gene finding | sequence comparison | phylogenetic trees | biopolymers | DNA double helix | secondary structure of RNA | protein folding | protein motors | membranes | cellular networks | neural networks | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | DNA | RNA | genetics | genes | genetic material | double helix | molecular biology | biotechnology | structure | function | heredity | complementarity | biological materials | genetic code | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | tRNA | reverse transcription | central dogma | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.03 Genetics (MIT)

Description

This course discusses the principles of genetics with application to the study of biological function at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. The topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, population genetics, use of genetic methods to analyze protein function, gene regulation and inherited disease.

Subjects

genetics | gene | DNA | RNA | mutation | genome | Watson and Crick | replication | transcription | DNA heliz | double helix | mRNA | messenger RNA | translation | ribosome | promoter | genetic analysis | alleles | genotype | wild type | phenotype | haploid | diploid | auxotrophic mutation | homozygous | heterozygous | recessive allele | dominant allele | complementation test | locus | incomplete dominance | incomplete penetrance | true-breeding | gametes | codominant | meiosis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.592J Statistical Physics in Biology (MIT)

Description

Statistical Physics in Biology is a survey of problems at the interface of statistical physics and modern biology. Topics include: bioinformatic methods for extracting information content of DNA; gene finding, sequence comparison, and phylogenetic trees; physical interactions responsible for structure of biopolymers; DNA double helix, secondary structure of RNA, and elements of protein folding; considerations of force, motion, and packaging; protein motors, membranes. We also look at collective behavior of biological elements, cellular networks, neural networks, and evolution.

Subjects

8.592 | HST.452 | Statistical physics | Bioinformatics | DNA | gene finding | sequence comparison | phylogenetic trees | biopolymers | DNA double helix | secondary structure of RNA | protein folding | protein motors | membranes | cellular networks | neural networks | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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