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4.510 Digital Design Fabrication (MIT) 4.510 Digital Design Fabrication (MIT)

Description

This course will guide graduate students through the process of using rapid prototyping and CAD/CAM devices in a studio environment. The class has a theoretical focus on machine use within the process of design. Each student is expected to have completed one graduate level of design computing with a full understanding of solid modeling in CAD. Students are also expected to have completed at least one graduate design studio. This course will guide graduate students through the process of using rapid prototyping and CAD/CAM devices in a studio environment. The class has a theoretical focus on machine use within the process of design. Each student is expected to have completed one graduate level of design computing with a full understanding of solid modeling in CAD. Students are also expected to have completed at least one graduate design studio.

Subjects

digital fabrication | digital fabrication | design | design | cad | cad | cam | cam | digital manufacturing | digital manufacturing | assembly | assembly | design geometry | design geometry | fabrication | fabrication | drafting | drafting | modeling | modeling | printing | printing | waterjet cutting | waterjet cutting | cnc manufacturing | cnc manufacturing | generative fabrication | generative fabrication | construction grammars | construction grammars | prototyping | prototyping | boston water taxi | boston water taxi

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT) 21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience. This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience.

Subjects

Expository writing | Expository writing | analyzing | analyzing | mass | mass | media | media | voice | voice | academic | academic | writing | writing | self-discovery | self-discovery | critical thinking | critical thinking | communicating | communicating | audience | audience | drafting | drafting | revising | revising | essays | essays

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT) 21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert. This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | writing | science | science | technology | technology | communications | communications | medicine | medicine | public | public | public interest | public interest | science in the public interest | science in the public interest | education | education | literacy | literacy | science literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | craft | craft | process | process | scientists | scientists | news | news | article | article | essay | essay | write | write | read | read | composition | composition | revise | revise | revision | revision | rewrite | rewrite | archive | archive | archival | archival | history | history | history of science | history of science | history of technology | history of technology | history of medicine | history of medicine | history of nature | history of nature | nature of history | nature of history | nature of technology | nature of technology | technological history | technological history | medical history | medical history | science of history | science of history | writing history | writing history | history of writing | history of writing | writing history of history of science | writing history of history of science | interview | interview | interviewing | interviewing | publish | publish | publishing | publishing | teaching writing | teaching writing | writing teaching | writing teaching | book | book | book review | book review | writing book review | writing book review | discussion | discussion | draft | draft | drafting | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.732 Costume Design for the Theater (MIT) 21M.732 Costume Design for the Theater (MIT)

Description

This is an intermediate workshop designed for students who have a basic understanding of the principles of theatrical design and who want a more intensive study of costume design and the psychology of clothing. Students develop designs that emerge through a process of character analysis, based on the script and directorial concept. Period research, design, and rendering skills are fostered through practical exercises. Instruction in basic costume construction, including drafting and draping, provide tools for students to produce final projects. This is an intermediate workshop designed for students who have a basic understanding of the principles of theatrical design and who want a more intensive study of costume design and the psychology of clothing. Students develop designs that emerge through a process of character analysis, based on the script and directorial concept. Period research, design, and rendering skills are fostered through practical exercises. Instruction in basic costume construction, including drafting and draping, provide tools for students to produce final projects.

Subjects

Theater | Theater | workshop | workshop | design | design | costume | costume | psychology | psychology | clothing | clothing | character analysis | character analysis | script | script | directorial concept | directorial concept | period | period | research | research | drawing | drawing | rendering | rendering | skills | skills | practical exercises | practical exercises | basic | basic | construction | construction | drafting | drafting | draping | draping | tools | tools | projects. | projects.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.732 Beginning Costume Design and Construction (MIT) 21M.732 Beginning Costume Design and Construction (MIT)

Description

This is an intermediate workshop designed for students who have a basic understanding of the principles of theatrical design and who want a more intensive study of costume design and the psychology of clothing. Students develop designs that emerge through a process of character analysis, based on the script and directorial concept. Period research, design, and rendering skills are fostered through practical exercises. Instruction in basic costume construction, including drafting and draping, provide tools for students to produce final projects. This is an intermediate workshop designed for students who have a basic understanding of the principles of theatrical design and who want a more intensive study of costume design and the psychology of clothing. Students develop designs that emerge through a process of character analysis, based on the script and directorial concept. Period research, design, and rendering skills are fostered through practical exercises. Instruction in basic costume construction, including drafting and draping, provide tools for students to produce final projects.

Subjects

Theater | Theater | workshop | workshop | design | design | costume | costume | psychology | psychology | clothing | clothing | character analysis | character analysis | script | script | directorial concept | directorial concept | period | period | research | research | drawing | drawing | rendering | rendering | skills | skills | practical exercises | practical exercises | construction | construction | drafting | drafting | draping | draping | tools | tools | projects | projects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT) 16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT)

Description

This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj

Subjects

Expository writing | Expository writing | analyzing | analyzing | mass | mass | media | media | voice | voice | academic | academic | writing | writing | self-discovery | self-discovery | critical thinking | critical thinking | communicating | communicating | audience | audience | drafting | drafting | revising | revising | essays | essays | analysis techniques | analysis techniques | complex structures | complex structures | material properties | material properties | structural design | structural design | failure | failure | longevity | longevity | Energy principles | Energy principles | structural analysis | structural analysis | statically-indeterminate structures | statically-indeterminate structures | solid continua | solid continua | Crack formation | Crack formation | fracture mechanics | fracture mechanics | failure modes | failure modes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.732 Costume Design for the Theater (MIT)

Description

This is an intermediate workshop designed for students who have a basic understanding of the principles of theatrical design and who want a more intensive study of costume design and the psychology of clothing. Students develop designs that emerge through a process of character analysis, based on the script and directorial concept. Period research, design, and rendering skills are fostered through practical exercises. Instruction in basic costume construction, including drafting and draping, provide tools for students to produce final projects.

Subjects

Theater | workshop | design | costume | psychology | clothing | character analysis | script | directorial concept | period | research | drawing | rendering | skills | practical exercises | basic | construction | drafting | draping | tools | projects.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.510 Digital Design Fabrication (MIT)

Description

This course will guide graduate students through the process of using rapid prototyping and CAD/CAM devices in a studio environment. The class has a theoretical focus on machine use within the process of design. Each student is expected to have completed one graduate level of design computing with a full understanding of solid modeling in CAD. Students are also expected to have completed at least one graduate design studio.

Subjects

digital fabrication | design | cad | cam | digital manufacturing | assembly | design geometry | fabrication | drafting | modeling | printing | waterjet cutting | cnc manufacturing | generative fabrication | construction grammars | prototyping | boston water taxi

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | science in the public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature writing | craft | process | scientists | news | article | essay | write | read | composition | revise | revision | rewrite | archive | archival | history | history of science | history of technology | history of medicine | history of nature | nature of history | nature of technology | technological history | medical history | science of history | writing history | history of writing | writing history of history of science | interview | interviewing | publish | publishing | teaching writing | writing teaching | book | book review | writing book review | discussion | draft | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT)

Description

This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj

Subjects

Expository writing | analyzing | mass | media | voice | academic | writing | self-discovery | critical thinking | communicating | audience | drafting | revising | essays | analysis techniques | complex structures | material properties | structural design | failure | longevity | Energy principles | structural analysis | statically-indeterminate structures | solid continua | Crack formation | fracture mechanics | failure modes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Geography Department, 1986

Description

IMAGELIBRARY/506 Persistent URL: archives.lse.ac.uk/dserve.exe?dsqServer=lib-4.lse.ac.uk&a...

Subjects

lse | londonschoolofeconomics | lselibrary | aroundtheschool1980s | 1980s | geographydepartment | woman | seated | working | table | map | apple | mac | computer | lamp | drafting | board

License

No known copyright restrictions

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LSE Library | FlickR

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21M.732 Beginning Costume Design and Construction (MIT)

Description

This is an intermediate workshop designed for students who have a basic understanding of the principles of theatrical design and who want a more intensive study of costume design and the psychology of clothing. Students develop designs that emerge through a process of character analysis, based on the script and directorial concept. Period research, design, and rendering skills are fostered through practical exercises. Instruction in basic costume construction, including drafting and draping, provide tools for students to produce final projects.

Subjects

Theater | workshop | design | costume | psychology | clothing | character analysis | script | directorial concept | period | research | drawing | rendering | skills | practical exercises | construction | drafting | draping | tools | projects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | science in the public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature writing | craft | process | scientists | news | article | essay | write | read | composition | revise | revision | rewrite | archive | archival | history | history of science | history of technology | history of medicine | history of nature | nature of history | nature of technology | technological history | medical history | science of history | writing history | history of writing | writing history of history of science | interview | interviewing | publish | publishing | teaching writing | writing teaching | book | book review | writing book review | discussion | draft | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT)

Description

This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj

Subjects

Expository writing | analyzing | mass | media | voice | academic | writing | self-discovery | critical thinking | communicating | audience | drafting | revising | essays | analysis techniques | complex structures | material properties | structural design | failure | longevity | Energy principles | structural analysis | statically-indeterminate structures | solid continua | Crack formation | fracture mechanics | failure modes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT)

Description

This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj

Subjects

Expository writing | analyzing | mass | media | voice | academic | writing | self-discovery | critical thinking | communicating | audience | drafting | revising | essays | analysis techniques | complex structures | material properties | structural design | failure | longevity | Energy principles | structural analysis | statically-indeterminate structures | solid continua | Crack formation | fracture mechanics | failure modes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience.

Subjects

Expository writing | analyzing | mass | media | voice | academic | writing | self-discovery | critical thinking | communicating | audience | drafting | revising | essays

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience.

Subjects

Expository writing | analyzing | mass | media | voice | academic | writing | self-discovery | critical thinking | communicating | audience | drafting | revising | essays

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience.

Subjects

Expository writing | analyzing | mass | media | voice | academic | writing | self-discovery | critical thinking | communicating | audience | drafting | revising | essays

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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