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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

11.482 | 11.482 | 1.825 | 1.825 | ESD.193 | ESD.193 | regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | Boston Redevelopment Authority | Boston Redevelopment Authority

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

11.482 | 11.482 | 1.825 | 1.825 | ESD.193 | ESD.193 | regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | Boston Redevelopment Authority | Boston Redevelopment Authority

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs, the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development, determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government, evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions, and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors. This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs, the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development, determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government, evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions, and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors.

Subjects

basic economic concerns | basic economic concerns | political | political | institutional | institutional | and cultural factors | and cultural factors | decentralization in national economic reform programs | decentralization in national economic reform programs | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | political | institutional | and cultural factors | political | institutional | and cultural factors | developing countries | developing countries | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | economic development | economic development | balance sheets | balance sheets | fiscal gap | fiscal gap | revenues | revenues | expenditures | expenditures | budget deficits | budget deficits | inflation | inflation | public finance theory | public finance theory | efficiency | efficiency | optimal taxation | optimal taxation | optimal user fees | optimal user fees | basic microeconomic theory | basic microeconomic theory | equity | equity | incidence | incidence | general equilibrium model | general equilibrium model | property taxation | property taxation | tax reform | tax reform | intergovernmental fiscal relations | intergovernmental fiscal relations | fiscal federalism | fiscal federalism | decentralization | decentralization | transfers | transfers | international lending agencies | international lending agencies | programming assistance | programming assistance | conditionalities | conditionalities | public debt | public debt | structural adjustment | structural adjustment | private sector participation | private sector participation | microfinance | microfinance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce classic macroeconomic issues such as growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, exchange rates, technological progress, and budget deficits. The course will provide a unified framework to address these issues and to study the impact of different policies, such as monetary and fiscal policies, on the aggregate behavior of individuals. These analytical tools will be used to understand the recent experience of the United States and other countries and to address how current policy initiatives affect their macroeconomic performance. This course is designed to introduce classic macroeconomic issues such as growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, exchange rates, technological progress, and budget deficits. The course will provide a unified framework to address these issues and to study the impact of different policies, such as monetary and fiscal policies, on the aggregate behavior of individuals. These analytical tools will be used to understand the recent experience of the United States and other countries and to address how current policy initiatives affect their macroeconomic performance.

Subjects

principles of macroeconomics | principles of macroeconomics | measuring macroeconomic variables | measuring macroeconomic variables | production functions | production functions | labor markets | labor markets | consumption | consumption | investment | investment | economic growth | economic growth | IS-LM model | IS-LM model | AS-AD model | AS-AD model | classical business policy | classical business policy | price rigidity | price rigidity | wage rigidity | wage rigidity | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | economic crises | economic crises | policy in an open economy | policy in an open economy | global economic imbalances | global economic imbalances

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be The seminar is designed to provide advanced graduate students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. We will also examine how such models are used in other countries. New material on analyzing regional development issues will be

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analysis and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA | 11.482 | 11.482 | 1.285 | 1.285 | ESD.193 | ESD.193

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT) 11.482J Regional Socioeconomic Impact Analyses and Modeling (MIT)

Description

The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca The advanced graduate seminar is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of selected regional economic theories and techniques and with experience in using alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models and related regional techniques on microcomputers. Discussions will be held on particular theoretical modeling and economic issues; linkages among theories, accounts, and policies; relationships between national and regional economic structures; and methods of adjusting and estimating regional input-output accounts and tables. Examples from the Boston area and other U.S. cities/regions will be used to illustrate points throughout the seminar. This year we will also examine international employment outsourcing from Boston industries and the economic impacts on the loca

Subjects

regional economic theories | regional economic theories | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | alternative socioeconomic impact assessment models | theoretical modeling | theoretical modeling | economics | economics | urban planning | urban planning | linkages | linkages | theories | theories | accounts | accounts | policies | policies | national and regional economic structures | national and regional economic structures | regional input-output accounts and tables | regional input-output accounts and tables | international employment outsourcing | international employment outsourcing | economic impact | economic impact | local economy | local economy | regional-development issues | regional-development issues | investment | investment | REMI | REMI | BRA | BRA | assessment | assessment | infrastructure | infrastructure | housing | housing | energy | energy | environment | environment | 11.482 | 11.482 | 1.285 | 1.285 | ESD.193 | ESD.193

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT) 11.487 Urban Public Finance in Developing Countries (MIT)

Description

This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs; the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development; determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government; evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions; and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors. This readings-based course analyzes the structure and operation of government systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on regional and local governments. Major topics include: the role of decentralization in national economic reform programs; the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development; determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government; evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions; and assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform. Emphasis is on basic economic concerns, with consideration given to political, institutional, and cultural factors.

Subjects

basic economic concerns | basic economic concerns | political | political | institutional | institutional | and cultural factors | and cultural factors | decentralization in national economic reform programs | decentralization in national economic reform programs | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | the potential impact of decentralized governments on local economic development | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | determination of optimal arrangements for sharing fiscal responsibilities among levels of government | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | evaluation of local revenue and expenditure decisions | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | assessment of prospects and options for intergovernmental fiscal reform | political | institutional | and cultural factors | political | institutional | and cultural factors | developing countries | developing countries | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | economic development | economic development | balance sheets | balance sheets | fiscal gap | fiscal gap | revenues | revenues | expenditures | expenditures | budget deficits | budget deficits | inflation | inflation | public finance theory | public finance theory | efficiency | efficiency | optimal taxation | optimal taxation | optimal user fees | optimal user fees | basic microeconomic theory | basic microeconomic theory | equity | equity | incidence | incidence | general equilibrium model | general equilibrium model | property taxation | property taxation | tax reform | tax reform | intergovernmental fiscal relations | intergovernmental fiscal relations | fiscal federalism | fiscal federalism | decentralization | decentralization | transfers | transfers | international lending agencies | international lending agencies | programming assistance | programming assistance | conditionalities | conditionalities | public debt | public debt | structural adjustment | structural adjustment | private sector participation | private sector participation | microfinance | microfinance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies. This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | economics | economics | output | output | employment | employment | determination | determination | unemployment | unemployment | interest rates | interest rates | Federal Reserve | Federal Reserve | inflation | inflation | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | public debt | public debt | international economics | international economics | goods market | goods market | market | market | financial markets | financial markets | open economy | open economy | exchange rate | exchange rate | labor market | labor market | phillips curve | phillips curve | growth | growth | Solow's model | Solow's model | MACROECONOMICS | MACROECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | OUTPUT | OUTPUT | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | EMPLOYMENT | EMPLOYMENT | DETERMINATION | DETERMINATION | UNEMPLOYMENT | UNEMPLOYMENT | INTEREST RATES | INTEREST RATES | FEDERAL RESERVE | FEDERAL RESERVE | INFLATION | INFLATION | MONETARY POLICY | MONETARY POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | PUBLIC DEBT | PUBLIC DEBT | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | GOODS MARKET | GOODS MARKET | MARKET | MARKET | FINANCIAL MARKETS | FINANCIAL MARKETS | OPEN ECONOMY | OPEN ECONOMY | EXCHANGE RATE | EXCHANGE RATE | LABOR MARKET | LABOR MARKET | PHILLIPS CURVE | PHILLIPS CURVE | GROWTH | GROWTH | SOLOW'S MODEL | SOLOW'S MODEL | Economics | Economics | Output | Output | Employment | Employment | Determination | Determination | Unemployment | Unemployment | Interest Rates | Interest Rates | Inflation | Inflation | Monetary Policy | Monetary Policy | Fiscal Policy | Fiscal Policy | Public Debt | Public Debt | International Economics | International Economics | Goods Market | Goods Market | Market | Market | Financial Markets | Financial Markets | Open Economy | Open Economy | Exchange Rate | Exchange Rate | Labor Market | Labor Market | Phillips Curve | Phillips Curve | Growth | Growth | Solow's Model | Solow's Model

License

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11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth (MIT) 11.481J Analyzing and Accounting for Regional Economic Growth (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on alternative ways in which the issues of growth, restructuring, innovation, knowledge, learning, and accounting and measurements can be examined, covering both industrialized and emerging countries. We give special emphasis to recent transformations in regional economies throughout the world and to the implications these changes have for the theories and research methods used in spatial economic analyses. Readings will relate mainly to the United States, but we cover pertinent material on foreign countries in lectures. This course focuses on alternative ways in which the issues of growth, restructuring, innovation, knowledge, learning, and accounting and measurements can be examined, covering both industrialized and emerging countries. We give special emphasis to recent transformations in regional economies throughout the world and to the implications these changes have for the theories and research methods used in spatial economic analyses. Readings will relate mainly to the United States, but we cover pertinent material on foreign countries in lectures.

Subjects

11.481 | 11.481 | 1.284 | 1.284 | ESD.192 | ESD.192 | regional growth | regional growth | political economy | political economy | spatial economic analysis | spatial economic analysis | regional economic growth | regional economic growth | economics | economics | regional theories | regional theories | regional planning | regional planning | regional and urban economics | regional and urban economics | neoclassical | neoclassical | dispersal economies | dispersal economies | regional accounting | regional accounting | social accounting matrices | social accounting matrices | underground economy | underground economy | price indices | price indices | shift share analyses | shift share analyses | energy | energy | determinants of growth | determinants of growth

License

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14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT) 14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT)

Description

The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory. The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory.

Subjects

information | information | economics | economics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | money | money | risk sharing | risk sharing | moral hazard | moral hazard | adverse selection | adverse selection | signaling | signaling | screening | screening | mechanism design | mechanism design | decision making | decision making | uncertainty | uncertainty | Decision-making | Decision-making | information economics | information economics | incentive theory | incentive theory | contract theory | contract theory | choice | choice | choices | choices | microeconomic analysis | microeconomic analysis | risk | risk

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.433J Real Estate Economics (MIT) 11.433J Real Estate Economics (MIT)

Description

This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate. This course, offered by the MIT Center for Real Estate, focuses on developing an understanding of the macroeconomic factors that shape and influence markets for real property. We will develop the theory of land markets and locational choice. The material covered includes studies of changing economic activities, demographic trends, transportation and local government behavior as they affect real estate.

Subjects

real estate; property; macroeconomic factors; supply and demand; market cycles; land markets; demographic trends; transportation; government regulation; real estate market; demographic analysis; regional growth; residential construction; new home building; commercial construction; retail stores; urban location theory; predicting demand; modeling techniques; urban economics; land use; urban growth; residential development; gentrification; zoning; property taxes; neighboorhood effects | real estate; property; macroeconomic factors; supply and demand; market cycles; land markets; demographic trends; transportation; government regulation; real estate market; demographic analysis; regional growth; residential construction; new home building; commercial construction; retail stores; urban location theory; predicting demand; modeling techniques; urban economics; land use; urban growth; residential development; gentrification; zoning; property taxes; neighboorhood effects | real estate | real estate | property | property | macroeconomic factors | macroeconomic factors | supply and demand | supply and demand | market cycles | market cycles | land markets | land markets | demographic trends | demographic trends | transportation | transportation | government regulation | government regulation | real estate market | real estate market | demographic analysis | demographic analysis | regional growth | regional growth | residential construction | residential construction | new home building | new home building | commercial construction | commercial construction | retail stores | retail stores | urban location theory | urban location theory | predicting demand | predicting demand | modeling techniques | modeling techniques | urban economics | urban economics | land use | land use | urban growth | urban growth | residential development | residential development | gentrification | gentrification | zoning | zoning | property taxes | property taxes | neighboorhood effects | neighboorhood effects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT) 14.124 Microeconomic Theory IV (MIT)

Description

The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory. The topic of the class is information economics. The purpose is to give an introduction to some of the main subjects in this field: risk sharing, moral hazard, adverse selection (signaling, screening), mechanism design, decision making under uncertainty. These subjects (and others) will be treated in more depth in the advanced theory courses on Contract Theory.

Subjects

information | information | economics | economics | microeconomic theory | microeconomic theory | money | money | risk sharing | risk sharing | moral hazard | moral hazard | adverse selection | adverse selection | signaling | signaling | screening | screening | mechanism design | mechanism design | decision making | decision making | uncertainty | uncertainty | Decision-making | Decision-making | information economics | information economics | incentive theory | incentive theory | contract theory | contract theory | choice | choice | choices | choices | microeconomic analysis | microeconomic analysis | risk | risk

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.014 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT) 15.014 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT)

Description

15.014 focuses on using case studies to investigate the macroenvironment in which firms operate. The course is divided in five parts: Basic tools of macroeconomic management Evaluation of different economic development strategies Crises in emerging markets: causes, solutions, and prevention Problems faced by transition economies Challenges of developed countries   This course is a full-term version of Applied Macro- and International Economics (15.012), with additional topics. 15.014 focuses on using case studies to investigate the macroenvironment in which firms operate. The course is divided in five parts: Basic tools of macroeconomic management Evaluation of different economic development strategies Crises in emerging markets: causes, solutions, and prevention Problems faced by transition economies Challenges of developed countries   This course is a full-term version of Applied Macro- and International Economics (15.012), with additional topics.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | international economics | international economics | world economies | world economies | global trade | global trade | economic policy | economic policy | inflation | inflation | interest rates | interest rates | exchange rates | exchange rates | national economic strategies | national economic strategies | developing nations | developing nations | currency crisis | currency crisis | transition economies | transition economies | global markets | global markets | world bank | world bank | IMF | IMF | international monetary fund | international monetary fund | monetary policy | monetary policy | depression | depression | unemployment | unemployment | international financial architecture | international financial architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT) 15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments. The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | applied economics | resource scarcity | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | allocate limited resources | business choices | business choices | modeling consumer choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | market efficiency | microeconomics | microeconomics | efficiency | efficiency | supply | supply | demand | demand | consumer theory | consumer theory | producer theory | producer theory | monopoly | monopoly | imperfect competition | imperfect competition | pricing | pricing | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | group decision making | group decision making | organizational architecture | organizational architecture | international trade | international trade | equity | equity | income distribution | income distribution | economic rewards | economic rewards | managerial economics | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | corporate finance theory | network economy | network economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.014 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT) 15.014 Applied Macro- and International Economics (MIT)

Description

15.014 focuses on using case studies to investigate the macroenvironment in which firms operate. The course is divided in five parts: Basic tools of macroeconomic management Evaluation of different economic development strategies Crises in emerging markets: causes, solutions, and prevention Problems faced by transition economies Challenges of developed countries   This course is a full-term version of Applied Macro- and International Economics (15.012), with additional topics. 15.014 focuses on using case studies to investigate the macroenvironment in which firms operate. The course is divided in five parts: Basic tools of macroeconomic management Evaluation of different economic development strategies Crises in emerging markets: causes, solutions, and prevention Problems faced by transition economies Challenges of developed countries   This course is a full-term version of Applied Macro- and International Economics (15.012), with additional topics.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | international economics | international economics | world economies | world economies | global trade | global trade | economic policy | economic policy | inflation | inflation | interest rates | interest rates | exchange rates | exchange rates | national economic strategies | national economic strategies | developing nations | developing nations | currency crisis | currency crisis | transition economies | transition economies | global markets | global markets | world bank | world bank | IMF | IMF | international monetary fund | international monetary fund | monetary policy | monetary policy | depression | depression | unemployment | unemployment | international financial architecture | international financial architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT) 11.471 Political Economy of Development Projects: Targeting the Poor (MIT)

Description

This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries, mainly through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are:the nature of poverty and targeting,the political-economy and politics of poverty-reducing initiatives,implementation experiences,employment and local economic development, particularly as related to small and medium enterprises and the informal sector,cooperatives and other forms of collective action for income generation, anddecentralization, civil society, and non-government organizations. This course treats public-sector policies, programs, and projects that attempt to reduce poverty and unemployment in developing countries, mainly through directly income-generating activities and employment. Topics covered are:the nature of poverty and targeting,the political-economy and politics of poverty-reducing initiatives,implementation experiences,employment and local economic development, particularly as related to small and medium enterprises and the informal sector,cooperatives and other forms of collective action for income generation, anddecentralization, civil society, and non-government organizations.

Subjects

public-sector policies | public-sector policies | programs | programs | enhancing the economic activities of poorer groups | enhancing the economic activities of poorer groups | micro-regions | developing countries | micro-regions | developing countries | local economic development | local economic development | small enterprises | small enterprises | collective action | collective action | labor and worker associations | labor and worker associations | nongovernment organizations | nongovernment organizations | literature on poverty | economic development | literature on poverty | economic development | reform of government | reform of government | equitable outcomes | equitable outcomes | public-sector programs | public-sector programs | public-sector projects | public-sector projects | developing countries | developing countries | labor associations | labor associations | worker associations | worker associations | poverty | poverty | economic development | economic development | political reform | political reform | employment | employment | political-economy | political-economy | cooperatives | cooperatives | decentralization | decentralization | civil society | civil society

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

Microeconomics | prices | normative economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | supply | demand | equilibrium | demand shift | supply shift | government interference | elasticity | revenue | empirical economics | consumer theory | preference assumptions | indifference curves | utility functions | marginal utility | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | Engel curves | income effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | labor economics | child labor | producer theory | variable inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | productivity | perfect competition | search theory | residual demand | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | agency problem | welfare economics | consumer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | monopoly | oligopoly | market power | price discrimination | price regulation | antitrust policy | mergers | cartel | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | international trade | uncertainty | capital markets | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | compounding | inflation | investment | discount rate | net present value | income distribution | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social security | moral hazard | taxation | EITC | healthcare | PPACA

License

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11.203 Microeconomics (MIT) 11.203 Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Microeconomics (11.203) is a course that runs for the first two-thirds of the semester. It is designed for incoming city planning students with little or no economics background. Incoming students take a voluntary microeconomics test-out at the beginning of the semester. Those that pass the test-out are exempt from taking Microeconomics.Planning Economics (11.202) is a course that runs for one-third of a semester and covers economics topics of particular interest to city planning students: location theory, the interplay between externalities and zoning, international trade and globalization, and housing finance. Few incoming students have had prior exposure to these topics.To minimize disruption, Planning Economics is positioned as the last third of a semester long core course on Planning Microeconomics (11.203) is a course that runs for the first two-thirds of the semester. It is designed for incoming city planning students with little or no economics background. Incoming students take a voluntary microeconomics test-out at the beginning of the semester. Those that pass the test-out are exempt from taking Microeconomics.Planning Economics (11.202) is a course that runs for one-third of a semester and covers economics topics of particular interest to city planning students: location theory, the interplay between externalities and zoning, international trade and globalization, and housing finance. Few incoming students have had prior exposure to these topics.To minimize disruption, Planning Economics is positioned as the last third of a semester long core course on Planning

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | markets | markets | profit | profit | standard of living | standard of living | economics for planners | economics for planners | income distribution | income distribution | economic analysis | economic analysis | deregulation | deregulation | profit maximization | profit maximization | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopoly | monopoly | tragedy of the commons | tragedy of the commons

License

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17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | political science | economics | wealth | neoclassical | development | ecology | power | trade | capital | foreign investment | intellectual property | migration | foreignpolicy | globalization | internet | sustainability | institutions | foreign policy | IPE | dual national objectives | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | neoclassical economics | development economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | perspectives | structural views | power relations | politics | international trade | capital flows | intellectual property rights | international migration | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | comparative | time | countries | regions | firms | industrial states | developing states | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | complexity | localization | technology | knowledge economy | finance | global markets | political economy | e-commerce

License

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11.203 Microeconomics for Planners (MIT) 11.203 Microeconomics for Planners (MIT)

Description

Microeconomics for Planners, 11.203, will ground you in basic microeconomics - how markets function, how to think about allocating scarce resources, what profit maximizing behavior means in different kinds of markets, how technology and trade reshapes all of this, etc. Along the way, it will also give you a sense of several of the major economic issues in the presidential campaign. We will consider activities that markets don’t directly capture - the value of an historic preservation district or the costs imposed by pollution - in November and December during Gateway: Planning Economics, 11.202. Microeconomics for Planners, 11.203, will ground you in basic microeconomics - how markets function, how to think about allocating scarce resources, what profit maximizing behavior means in different kinds of markets, how technology and trade reshapes all of this, etc. Along the way, it will also give you a sense of several of the major economic issues in the presidential campaign. We will consider activities that markets don’t directly capture - the value of an historic preservation district or the costs imposed by pollution - in November and December during Gateway: Planning Economics, 11.202.

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | markets | markets | profit | profit | standard of living | standard of living | economics for planners | economics for planners | income distribution | income distribution | economic analysis | economic analysis | deregulation | deregulation | profit maximization | profit maximization | oligopoly; monopoly | oligopoly; monopoly | tragedy of the commons | tragedy of the commons | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopoly | monopoly

License

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