Searching for economics : 2542 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102

14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT) 14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmen

Subjects

Microeconomics | Microeconomics | prices | prices | normative economics | normative economics | positive economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | microeconomic applications | supply | supply | demand | demand | equilibrium | equilibrium | demand shift | demand shift | supply shift | supply shift | government interference | government interference | elasticity | elasticity | revenue | revenue | empirical economics | empirical economics | consumer theory | consumer theory | preference assumptions | preference assumptions | indifference curves | indifference curves | utility functions | utility functions | marginal utility | marginal utility | budget constraints | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | corner solutions | Engel curves | Engel curves | income effect | income effect | substitution effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | Giffin good | labor economics | labor economics | child labor | child labor | producer theory | producer theory | variable inputs | variable inputs | fixed inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | returns to scale | productivity | productivity | perfect competition | perfect competition | search theory | search theory | residual demand | residual demand | shutdown decisions | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | market equilibrium | agency problem | agency problem | welfare economics | welfare economics | consumer surplus | consumer surplus | producer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | dead weight loss | monopoly | monopoly | oligopoly | oligopoly | market power | market power | price discrimination | price discrimination | price regulation | price regulation | antitrust policy | antitrust policy | mergers | mergers | cartel | cartel | game theory | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | Cournot model | duopoly | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | factor markets | international trade | international trade | uncertainty | uncertainty | capital markets | capital markets | intertemporal choice | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | real interest rate | compounding | compounding | inflation | inflation | investment | investment | discount rate | discount rate | net present value | net present value | income distribution | income distribution | social welfare function | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social insurance | social security | social security | moral hazard | moral hazard | taxation | taxation | EITC | EITC | healthcare | healthcare | PPACA | PPACA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies. This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | economics | economics | output | output | employment | employment | determination | determination | unemployment | unemployment | interest rates | interest rates | Federal Reserve | Federal Reserve | inflation | inflation | monetary policy | monetary policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | public debt | public debt | international economics | international economics | goods market | goods market | market | market | financial markets | financial markets | open economy | open economy | exchange rate | exchange rate | labor market | labor market | phillips curve | phillips curve | growth | growth | Solow's model | Solow's model | MACROECONOMICS | MACROECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | OUTPUT | OUTPUT | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | EMPLOYMENT | EMPLOYMENT | DETERMINATION | DETERMINATION | UNEMPLOYMENT | UNEMPLOYMENT | INTEREST RATES | INTEREST RATES | FEDERAL RESERVE | FEDERAL RESERVE | INFLATION | INFLATION | MONETARY POLICY | MONETARY POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | PUBLIC DEBT | PUBLIC DEBT | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | GOODS MARKET | GOODS MARKET | MARKET | MARKET | FINANCIAL MARKETS | FINANCIAL MARKETS | OPEN ECONOMY | OPEN ECONOMY | EXCHANGE RATE | EXCHANGE RATE | LABOR MARKET | LABOR MARKET | PHILLIPS CURVE | PHILLIPS CURVE | GROWTH | GROWTH | SOLOW'S MODEL | SOLOW'S MODEL | Economics | Economics | Output | Output | Employment | Employment | Determination | Determination | Unemployment | Unemployment | Interest Rates | Interest Rates | Inflation | Inflation | Monetary Policy | Monetary Policy | Fiscal Policy | Fiscal Policy | Public Debt | Public Debt | International Economics | International Economics | Goods Market | Goods Market | Market | Market | Financial Markets | Financial Markets | Open Economy | Open Economy | Exchange Rate | Exchange Rate | Labor Market | Labor Market | Phillips Curve | Phillips Curve | Growth | Growth | Solow's Model | Solow's Model

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT) 17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences. This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | political science | political science | economics | economics | wealth | wealth | neoclassical | neoclassical | development | development | ecology | ecology | power | power | trade | trade | capital | capital | foreign investment | foreign investment | intellectual property | intellectual property | migration | migration | foreignpolicy | foreignpolicy | globalization | globalization | internet | internet | sustainability | sustainability | institutions | institutions | foreign policy | foreign policy | IPE | IPE | dual national objectives | dual national objectives | global context | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | international political economy | neoclassical economics | neoclassical economics | development economics | development economics | ecological economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | lateral pressure | perspectives | perspectives | structural views | structural views | power relations | power relations | politics | politics | international trade | international trade | capital flows | capital flows | intellectual property rights | intellectual property rights | international migration | international migration | foreign economic policy | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | disciplinary | comparative | comparative | time | time | countries | countries | regions | regions | firms | firms | industrial states | industrial states | developing states | developing states | macro-level consequences | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | macro-level influences | complexity | complexity | localization | localization | technology | technology | knowledge economy | knowledge economy | finance | finance | global markets | global markets | political economy | political economy | e-commerce | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-17.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.75 Political Economy and Economic Development (MIT) 14.75 Political Economy and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between political institutions and economic development, covering key theoretical issues as well as recent empirical evidence. Topics include corruption, democracy, dictatorship, and war. Discusses not just what we know on these topics, but how we know it, covering how to craft a good empirical study or field experiment and how to discriminate between reliable and unreliable evidence. This course explores the relationship between political institutions and economic development, covering key theoretical issues as well as recent empirical evidence. Topics include corruption, democracy, dictatorship, and war. Discusses not just what we know on these topics, but how we know it, covering how to craft a good empirical study or field experiment and how to discriminate between reliable and unreliable evidence.

Subjects

dictatorship | dictatorship | corruption | corruption | economics | economics | political economics | political economics | developmental economics | developmental economics | democracy | democracy | war | war | civil war | civil war | voting | voting | collective action | collective action

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.475 Environmental Economics and Government Responses to Market Failure (MIT) 14.475 Environmental Economics and Government Responses to Market Failure (MIT)

Description

This course explores the theory behind and evidence on regulatory, tax, and other government responses to problems of market failure. Special emphasis is given to developing and implementing tools to evaluate environmental policies. Other topics include cost-benefit analysis, measurement of the benefits of non-market goods and costs of regulations, and the evaluation of the impact of regulations in areas such as financial markets, workplace health and safety, consumer product safety, and other contexts. This course explores the theory behind and evidence on regulatory, tax, and other government responses to problems of market failure. Special emphasis is given to developing and implementing tools to evaluate environmental policies. Other topics include cost-benefit analysis, measurement of the benefits of non-market goods and costs of regulations, and the evaluation of the impact of regulations in areas such as financial markets, workplace health and safety, consumer product safety, and other contexts.

Subjects

economics | economics | environment | environment | public finance | public finance | environmental economics | environmental economics | research | research | causation | causation | pigovian taxes | pigovian taxes | coasian | coasian | bost-benefit analysis | bost-benefit analysis | public economics | public economics | hedonic method | hedonic method | valuation | valuation | housing | housing | health effects | health effects | dose-response | dose-response | avoidance | avoidance | household production function | household production function | locational equilibrium | locational equilibrium | policy | policy | regulations | regulations | double dividend | double dividend | climate change | climate change | development | development | markets | markets | labor | labor | workplace | workplace | safety | safety | advertising | advertising | traffic | traffic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT) 14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena. This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect | prospect | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | economics | economics | behavior | behavior | preferences | preferences | cognition | cognition | trust | trust | vengence | vengence | impatience | impatience | impulsivity | impulsivity | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | reinforcement | reinforcement | classical conditioning | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | loss-aversion | over-confidence | over-confidence | self-serving biases | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | equilibrium | rational choice | rational choice | utility maximization | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | game theory | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.957 Frameworks of Urban Governance (MIT) 11.957 Frameworks of Urban Governance (MIT)

Description

Urban governance comprises the various forces, institutions, and movements that guide economic and physical development, the distribution of resources, social interactions, and other aspects of daily life in urban areas. This course examines governance from legal, political, social, and economic perspectives. In addition, we will discuss how these structures constrain collective decision making about particular urban issues (immigration, education…). Assignments will be nightly readings and a short paper relating an urban issue to the frameworks outlined in the class. Urban governance comprises the various forces, institutions, and movements that guide economic and physical development, the distribution of resources, social interactions, and other aspects of daily life in urban areas. This course examines governance from legal, political, social, and economic perspectives. In addition, we will discuss how these structures constrain collective decision making about particular urban issues (immigration, education…). Assignments will be nightly readings and a short paper relating an urban issue to the frameworks outlined in the class.

Subjects

physical development | physical development | urban sector | urban sector | urban politics | urban politics | immigration | immigration | education | education | economics | economics | environment | environment | public finance | public finance | environmental economics | environmental economics | research | research | causation | causation | pigovian taxes | pigovian taxes | coasian | coasian | bost-benefit analysis | bost-benefit analysis | public economics | public economics | hedonic method | hedonic method | valuation | valuation | housing | housing | health effects | health effects | dose-response | dose-response | avoidance | avoidance | household production function | household production function | locational equilibrium | locational equilibrium | policy | policy | regulations | regulations | double dividend | double dividend | climate change | climate change | development | development | markets | markets | labor | labor | workplace | workplace | safety | safety | advertising | advertising | traffic | traffic

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.123 Big Plans (MIT) 11.123 Big Plans (MIT)

Description

This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered. This course explores social, technological, political, economic, and cultural implications of "Big Plans" in the urban context. Local and international case studies (such as Boston's Central Artery and Curitiba, Brazil's bus transit system) are used to understand the process of making major changes to the city fabric. The efficacy of top-down and bottom-up planning and the applicability of planning strategies across cultural boundaries are considered.

Subjects

large projects | large projects | debate and commitment in advance of action | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | technology | politics | politics | economics | economics | culture | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | ways of generating public support | ways of generating public support | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | staging strategies for projects that take many years to complete | environmental impacts | environmental impacts | political accountability | political accountability | health and safety factors | health and safety factors | social equity | social equity | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | authoritarian and participatory styles of planning | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture | debate and commitment in advance of action | technology | politics | economics | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT) 15.024 Applied Economics for Managers (MIT)

Description

The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments. The fact of scarcity forces individuals, firms, and societies to choose among alternative uses – or allocations – of its limited resources. Accordingly, the first part of this summer course seeks to understand how economists model the choice process of individual consumers and firms, and how markets work to coordinate these choices. It also examines how well markets perform this function using the economist's criterion of market efficiency. Overall, this course focuses on microeconomics, with some topics from macroeconomics and international trade. It emphasizes the integration of theory, data, and judgment in the analysis of corporate decisions and public policy, and in the assessment of changing U.S. and international business environments.

Subjects

applied economics | applied economics | resource scarcity | resource scarcity | allocate limited resources | allocate limited resources | business choices | business choices | modeling consumer choices | modeling consumer choices | market efficiency | market efficiency | microeconomics | microeconomics | efficiency | efficiency | supply | supply | demand | demand | consumer theory | consumer theory | producer theory | producer theory | monopoly | monopoly | imperfect competition | imperfect competition | pricing | pricing | public goods | public goods | externalities | externalities | information uncertainty | information uncertainty | group decision making | group decision making | organizational architecture | organizational architecture | international trade | international trade | equity | equity | income distribution | income distribution | economic rewards | economic rewards | managerial economics | managerial economics | corporate finance theory | corporate finance theory | network economy | network economy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. At MIT, this course was team taught by Prof. Robert Townsend, who taught for the first half of the semester, and Prof. Abhijit Banerjee, who taught during the second half. On OCW we are only including materials associated with sessions one through 13, which comprise the first half of the class.

Subjects

development economics | development economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | returns to human capital | population theory | population theory | technology | technology | returns to capital | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | non-aggregative growth models | finance | finance | property rights | property rights | trade | trade | reputation | reputation | history | history | culture | culture | political science | political science | environment | environment | emerging market economies | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | neo-Classical standards | interventions | interventions | mechanism design | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allavcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues. This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution and institutional change; firm structure in developing countries; development, transparency, and functioning of financial markets; privatization; and, banks and credit market institutions in emerging markets. This course contributes to the fulfillment of requirements for the Development field for Economics Ph.D. students at both Harvard and MIT. This course is jointly taught by Harvard and MIT instructors. The Harvard course is Economics 2390c Development Economics II: Macroeconomic Issues.

Subjects

development economics | development economics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | aggregative growth theory | aggregative growth theory | returns to human capital | returns to human capital | population theory | population theory | technology | technology | returns to capital | returns to capital | non-aggregative growth models | non-aggregative growth models | finance | finance | property rights | property rights | trade | trade | reputation | reputation | history | history | culture | culture | political science | political science | enviroment | enviroment | emerging market economies | emerging market economies | measurement frameworks | measurement frameworks | neo-Classical standards | neo-Classical standards | interventions | interventions | mechanism design | mechanism design | applied general equilibrium development economics | applied general equilibrium development economics | supply-side | supply-side

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.01SC Principles of Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

14.01 Principles of Microeconomics is an introductory undergraduate course that teaches the fundamentals of microeconomics. This course introduces microeconomic concepts and analysis, supply and demand analysis, theories of the firm and individual behavior, competition and monopoly, and welfare economics. Students will also be introduced to the use of microeconomic applications to address problems in current economic policy throughout the semester. This course is a core subject in MIT's undergraduate Energy Studies Minor. This Institute-wide program complements the deep expertise obtained in any major with a broad understanding of the interlinked realms of science, technology, and social sciences as they relate to energy and associated environmental challenges.

Subjects

Microeconomics | prices | normative economics | positive economics | microeconomic applications | supply | demand | equilibrium | demand shift | supply shift | government interference | elasticity | revenue | empirical economics | consumer theory | preference assumptions | indifference curves | utility functions | marginal utility | budget constraints | marginal rate of transformation | opportunity cost | constrained utility maximization | corner solutions | Engel curves | income effect | substitution effect | Giffin good | labor economics | child labor | producer theory | variable inputs | fixed inputs | firm production functions | marginal rate of technical substitution | returns to scale | productivity | perfect competition | search theory | residual demand | shutdown decisions | market equilibrium | agency problem | welfare economics | consumer surplus | producer surplus | dead weight loss | monopoly | oligopoly | market power | price discrimination | price regulation | antitrust policy | mergers | cartel | game theory | Nash equilibrium | Cournot model | duopoly | non-cooperative competition | Bertrand competition | factor markets | international trade | uncertainty | capital markets | intertemporal choice | real interest rate | compounding | inflation | investment | discount rate | net present value | income distribution | social welfare function | Utilitarianism | Raulsian criteria | Nozickian | commodity egalitarianism | isowelfare curves | social insurance | social security | moral hazard | taxation | EITC | healthcare | PPACA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allocwscholarcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.203 Microeconomics (MIT) 11.203 Microeconomics (MIT)

Description

Microeconomics (11.203) is a course that runs for the first two-thirds of the semester. It is designed for incoming city planning students with little or no economics background. Incoming students take a voluntary microeconomics test-out at the beginning of the semester. Those that pass the test-out are exempt from taking Microeconomics.Planning Economics (11.202) is a course that runs for one-third of a semester and covers economics topics of particular interest to city planning students: location theory, the interplay between externalities and zoning, international trade and globalization, and housing finance. Few incoming students have had prior exposure to these topics.To minimize disruption, Planning Economics is positioned as the last third of a semester long core course on Planning Microeconomics (11.203) is a course that runs for the first two-thirds of the semester. It is designed for incoming city planning students with little or no economics background. Incoming students take a voluntary microeconomics test-out at the beginning of the semester. Those that pass the test-out are exempt from taking Microeconomics.Planning Economics (11.202) is a course that runs for one-third of a semester and covers economics topics of particular interest to city planning students: location theory, the interplay between externalities and zoning, international trade and globalization, and housing finance. Few incoming students have had prior exposure to these topics.To minimize disruption, Planning Economics is positioned as the last third of a semester long core course on Planning

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | markets | markets | profit | profit | standard of living | standard of living | economics for planners | economics for planners | income distribution | income distribution | economic analysis | economic analysis | deregulation | deregulation | profit maximization | profit maximization | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopoly | monopoly | tragedy of the commons | tragedy of the commons

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT) 14.661 Labor Economics I (MIT)

Description

Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests. Neoclassical analysis of the labor market and its institutions. A systematic development of the theory of labor supply, labor demand, and human capital. Topics discussed also include wage and employment determination, turnover, search, immigration, unemployment, equalizing differences, and institutions in the labor market. There is particular emphasis on the interaction of theoretical and empirical modeling and the development of independent research interests.

Subjects

labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor economics | public policy | schooling | learning | matching | experience | wages | minimum wage | college | investment | training | firms | corporations | labor | unions | panel data | neoclassical model | turnover models | turnover | economics | labor | labor | market | market | statistics | statistics | theory | theory | neoclassical | neoclassical | supply | supply | model | model | life-cycle | life-cycle | demand | demand | wages | wages | immigration | immigration | human capital | human capital | econometrics | econometrics | liquidity | liquidity | constraints | constraints | mobility | mobility | incentives | incentives | organization | organization | moral hazard | moral hazard | insurance | insurance | investments | investments | efficiency | efficiency | unemployment | unemployment | search | search | jobs | jobs | training | training | capital | capital | firm | firm | technology | technology | skills | skills | risk | risk | signaling | signaling | discrimination | discrimination | self-selection | self-selection | learning | learning | natives | natives

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

17.422 Field Seminar in International Political Economy (MIT)

Description

This field seminar in international political economy covers major theoretical, empirical, and policy perspectives. The basic orientation is disciplinary and comparative (over time and across countries, regions, firms), spanning issues relevant to both industrial and developing states. Special attention is given to challenges and dilemmas shaped by the macro-level consequences of micro-level behavior, and by micro-level adjustments to macro-level influences.

Subjects

international relations | political science | economics | wealth | neoclassical | development | ecology | power | trade | capital | foreign investment | intellectual property | migration | foreignpolicy | globalization | internet | sustainability | institutions | foreign policy | IPE | dual national objectives | global context | pursuit of power | pursuit of wealth | international political economy | neoclassical economics | development economics | ecological economics | lateral pressure | perspectives | structural views | power relations | politics | international trade | capital flows | intellectual property rights | international migration | foreign economic policy | international economic institutions | theoretical perspectives | empirical perspectives | policy perspectives | disciplinary | comparative | time | countries | regions | firms | industrial states | developing states | macro-level consequences | micro-level behavior | micro-level adjustments | macro-level influences | complexity | localization | technology | knowledge economy | finance | global markets | political economy | e-commerce

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.42 Environmental Policy and Economics (MIT) 14.42 Environmental Policy and Economics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? What is "sustainable development"? How do environmental problems differ in developing countries? Are we running out of oil and other natural resources? Should we be more energy efficient? To gain real world experience, the course is scheduled to include a visit to the MIT cogeneration plant. We will also do This course explores the proper role of government in the regulation of the environment. It will help students develop the tools to estimate the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. These tools will be used to evaluate a series of current policy questions, including: Should air and water pollution regulations be tightened or loosened? What are the costs of climate change in the U.S. and abroad? Is there a "Race to the Bottom" in environmental regulation? What is "sustainable development"? How do environmental problems differ in developing countries? Are we running out of oil and other natural resources? Should we be more energy efficient? To gain real world experience, the course is scheduled to include a visit to the MIT cogeneration plant. We will also do

Subjects

economics | economics | policy | policy | environment | environment | environmental economics | environmental economics | public policy | public policy | cost-benefit analysis | cost-benefit analysis | resource management | resource management | environmental regulation | environmental regulation | health | health | sustainability | sustainability | public goods | public goods | pollution | pollution | Pigouvian taxes | Pigouvian taxes | liability | liability | kuznets curves | kuznets curves | competition | competition | growth | growth | double dividend | double dividend | hedonic | hedonic | valuation | valuation | global warming | global warming | Porter hypothesis | Porter hypothesis | social choice | social choice | carbon offsets | carbon offsets | clean development | clean development | renewables | renewables

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.02 Principles of Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course provides an overview of the following macroeconomic issues: the determination of output, employment, unemployment, interest rates, and inflation. Monetary and fiscal policies are discussed, as are public debt and international economic issues. This course also introduces basic models of macroeconomics and illustrates principles with the experience of the United States and other economies.

Subjects

macroeconomics | economics | output | employment | determination | unemployment | interest rates | Federal Reserve | inflation | monetary policy | fiscal policy | public debt | international economics | goods market | market | financial markets | open economy | exchange rate | labor market | phillips curve | growth | Solow's model | MACROECONOMICS | ECONOMICS | OUTPUT | Macroeconomics | EMPLOYMENT | DETERMINATION | UNEMPLOYMENT | INTEREST RATES | FEDERAL RESERVE | INFLATION | MONETARY POLICY | FISCAL POLICY | PUBLIC DEBT | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS | GOODS MARKET | MARKET | FINANCIAL MARKETS | OPEN ECONOMY | EXCHANGE RATE | LABOR MARKET | PHILLIPS CURVE | GROWTH | SOLOW'S MODEL | Economics | Output | Employment | Determination | Unemployment | Interest Rates | Inflation | Monetary Policy | Fiscal Policy | Public Debt | International Economics | Goods Market | Market | Financial Markets | Open Economy | Exchange Rate | Labor Market | Phillips Curve | Growth | Solow's Model

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT) 14.64 Labor Economics and Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment. This course is an introduction to labor economics with an emphasis on applied microeconomic theory and empirical analysis. We are especially interested in the link between research and public policy. Topics to be covered include: labor supply and demand, taxes and transfers, minimum wages, immigration, human capital, education production, inequality, discrimination, unions and strikes, and unemployment.

Subjects

labor Economics | labor Economics | public policy | public policy | applied microeconomics | applied microeconomics | empirical analysis | empirical analysis | labor supply and demand | labor supply and demand | taxes and transfers | taxes and transfers | human capital | human capital | minimum wages | minimum wages | income distribution | income distribution | unions and strikes | unions and strikes | immigration | immigration | incentives | incentives | discrimination | discrimination | unemployment and unemployment insurance | unemployment and unemployment insurance | bargaining | bargaining | economics of the family | economics of the family | decision to work | decision to work | home production | home production | monpsony | monpsony | education | education | training | training

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.203 Microeconomics for Planners (MIT) 11.203 Microeconomics for Planners (MIT)

Description

Microeconomics for Planners, 11.203, will ground you in basic microeconomics - how markets function, how to think about allocating scarce resources, what profit maximizing behavior means in different kinds of markets, how technology and trade reshapes all of this, etc. Along the way, it will also give you a sense of several of the major economic issues in the presidential campaign. We will consider activities that markets don’t directly capture - the value of an historic preservation district or the costs imposed by pollution - in November and December during Gateway: Planning Economics, 11.202. Microeconomics for Planners, 11.203, will ground you in basic microeconomics - how markets function, how to think about allocating scarce resources, what profit maximizing behavior means in different kinds of markets, how technology and trade reshapes all of this, etc. Along the way, it will also give you a sense of several of the major economic issues in the presidential campaign. We will consider activities that markets don’t directly capture - the value of an historic preservation district or the costs imposed by pollution - in November and December during Gateway: Planning Economics, 11.202.

Subjects

microeconomics | microeconomics | markets | markets | profit | profit | standard of living | standard of living | economics for planners | economics for planners | income distribution | income distribution | economic analysis | economic analysis | deregulation | deregulation | profit maximization | profit maximization | oligopoly; monopoly | oligopoly; monopoly | tragedy of the commons | tragedy of the commons | oligopoly | oligopoly | monopoly | monopoly

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Environmental Issues in Materials Selection (MIT) Environmental Issues in Materials Selection (MIT)

Description

Choice of material has implications throughout the life-cycle of a product, influencing many aspects of economic and environmental performance. This course will provide a survey of methods for evaluating those implications. Lectures will cover topics in material choice concepts, fundamentals of engineering economics, manufacturing economics modeling methods, and life-cycle environmental evaluation. Choice of material has implications throughout the life-cycle of a product, influencing many aspects of economic and environmental performance. This course will provide a survey of methods for evaluating those implications. Lectures will cover topics in material choice concepts, fundamentals of engineering economics, manufacturing economics modeling methods, and life-cycle environmental evaluation.

Subjects

cost | cost | value | value | cash flow | cash flow | discount | discount | life-cycle | life-cycle | engineering economics | engineering economics | manufacturing economics | manufacturing economics | LCA | LCA | life-cycle assessment | life-cycle assessment | PCBM | PCBM | process-based cost modeling | process-based cost modeling | cost model | cost model | environmental impact | environmental impact | uncertainty | uncertainty | consumption | consumption | efficiency | efficiency | waste | waste | Ashby | Ashby

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-3.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Credit Crunch Live

Description

Economics students of St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford pose questions to a panel of experts about the credit crunch and global recession. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

quantitative easing | macroeconomics | credit crunch | nationalization | money | keynesian | economics | recession | banking | bail-out | businesses | fiscal policy | nationalisation | banks | keynesianism | VAT | obama | quantitative easing | macroeconomics | credit crunch | nationalization | money | keynesian | economics | recession | banking | bail-out | businesses | fiscal policy | nationalisation | banks | keynesianism | VAT | obama

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129190/audio.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.05 Intermediate Macroeconomics (MIT) 14.05 Intermediate Macroeconomics (MIT)

Description

This course uses the tools of macroeconomics to study various macroeconomic policy problems in-depth. The problems range from economic growth in the long run, to government finances in the intermediate run, and economic stability in the short run. Many economic models used today are surveyed. This course uses the tools of macroeconomics to study various macroeconomic policy problems in-depth. The problems range from economic growth in the long run, to government finances in the intermediate run, and economic stability in the short run. Many economic models used today are surveyed.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | Solow Model | Solow Model | consumption | consumption | saving | saving | labor supply | labor supply | Ramsey model | Ramsey model | endogenous growth | endogenous growth | policy | policy | economics | economics | financial crisis | financial crisis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT) 14.452 Macroeconomic Theory II (MIT)

Description

This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. The course is organized around nine topics/sections: Fluctuations and Facts; The basic model: the consumption/saving choice; Allowing for a labor/leisure choice (the RBC model); Allowing for non trivial investment decisions; Allowing for two goods; Introducing money; Introducing price setting; Introducing staggering of price decisions; and Applications to fiscal and monetary policy. This is the second course in the four-quarter graduate sequence in macroeconomics. Its purpose is to introduce the basic models macroeconomists use to study fluctuations. The course is organized around nine topics/sections: Fluctuations and Facts; The basic model: the consumption/saving choice; Allowing for a labor/leisure choice (the RBC model); Allowing for non trivial investment decisions; Allowing for two goods; Introducing money; Introducing price setting; Introducing staggering of price decisions; and Applications to fiscal and monetary policy.

Subjects

Economics | Economics | Macroeconomics | Macroeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomics | fluctuations | fluctuations | consumption | consumption | saving | saving | choice | choice | labor | labor | leisure | leisure | RBC model | RBC model | non trivial investment decisions | non trivial investment decisions | money | money | price setting | price setting | staggering price decisions | staggering price decisions | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | monetary policy. | monetary policy. | monetary policy | monetary policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT) 14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process. This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | heuristics | heuristics | noise | noise | confusion | confusion | competition | competition | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | games | games | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | consumption | hyperbolics | hyperbolics | temptation | temptation | assets | assets | puzzles | puzzles | bubbles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata