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Poetry and Tobacco

Description

This podcast looks at the relationship between tobacco and poetic inspiration, through some popular comic poems. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | tobacco | eighteenth-century life | alexander pope | jonathan swift | miscellanies | eighteenth-century poetry | poetic inspiration | #greatwriters | tobacco | eighteenth-century life | alexander pope | jonathan swift | miscellanies | eighteenth-century poetry | poetic inspiration

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21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT) 21H.968J Nature, Environment, and Empire (MIT)

Description

This course is an exploration of the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and concrete exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This course is an exploration of the relationship between the study of natural history, both domestic and exotic, by Europeans and Americans, and concrete exploitation of the natural world, focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Subjects

History | History | empire | empire | environment | environment | nature | nature | natural history | natural history | domestic | domestic | exotic | exotic | Europeans | Europeans | Americans | Americans | eighteenth | eighteenth | nineteenth centuries | nineteenth centuries | animals | animals | 21H.968 | 21H.968 | STS.415 | STS.415

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448 Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448 Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of 'feedback mechanisms' in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Turing. There will be about 100 pages of weekly reading--sometimes fewer, sometimes more. Note: The title and content of this course, taught steadily at MIT since 1987, predate Michael Ruse's recent 2003 volume by the same titl In the Origin of Species, Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of 'feedback mechanisms' in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, Hardy, H. G. Wells, and Turing. There will be about 100 pages of weekly reading--sometimes fewer, sometimes more. Note: The title and content of this course, taught steadily at MIT since 1987, predate Michael Ruse's recent 2003 volume by the same titl

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | 21W.739 | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Mary Leapor

Description

Dr Jennifer Batt talks about Mary Leapor, an 18th Century kitchen maid who wrote accomplished verses and won accolades from literary society. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poem | #greatwriters | literature | great writers inspire | mary leapor | eighteenth-century | poem | #greatwriters | literature | great writers inspire | mary leapor | eighteenth-century

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.705 Major Authors: America's Literary Scientists (MIT) 21L.705 Major Authors: America's Literary Scientists (MIT)

Description

Global exploration in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries radically changed Western science, orienting philosophies of natural history to more focused fields like comparative anatomy, botany, and geology. In the United States, European scientific advances and home-grown ventures like the Wilkes Exploring Expedition to Antarctica and the Pacific inspired new endeavors in cartography, ethnography, zoology, and evolutionary theory, replacing rigid models of thought and classification with more fluid and active systems. They inspired literary authors as well. This class will examine some of the most remarkable of these authors—Herman Melville (Moby-Dick and "The Encantadas"), Henry David Thoreau (Walden), Sarah Orne Jewett (Country of the Pointed Firs), Edith Wharton (House Global exploration in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries radically changed Western science, orienting philosophies of natural history to more focused fields like comparative anatomy, botany, and geology. In the United States, European scientific advances and home-grown ventures like the Wilkes Exploring Expedition to Antarctica and the Pacific inspired new endeavors in cartography, ethnography, zoology, and evolutionary theory, replacing rigid models of thought and classification with more fluid and active systems. They inspired literary authors as well. This class will examine some of the most remarkable of these authors—Herman Melville (Moby-Dick and "The Encantadas"), Henry David Thoreau (Walden), Sarah Orne Jewett (Country of the Pointed Firs), Edith Wharton (House

Subjects

America's literary scientists | America's literary scientists | global exploration in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries | global exploration in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries | Wilkes exploring expedition to Antarctica and the Pacific | Wilkes exploring expedition to Antarctica and the Pacific | cartography | cartography | ethnography | ethnography | zoology | zoology | evolutionary theory | evolutionary theory | Herman Melville | Herman Melville | Henry David Thoreau | Henry David Thoreau | Sarah Orne Jewett | Sarah Orne Jewett | Toni Morrison | Toni Morrison

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT) 24.919 Topics in Linguistics: Creole Languages and Caribbean Identities (MIT)

Description

The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s The Creole languages spoken in the Caribbean are linguistic by-products of the historical events triggered by colonization and the slave trade in Africa and the "New World". In a nutshell, these languages are the results of language acquisition in the specific social settings defined by the history of contact between African and European peoples in 17th-/18th-century Caribbean colonies. One of the best known Creole languages, and the one with the largest community of speakers, is Haitian Creole. Its lexicon and various aspects of its grammar are primarily derived from varieties of French as spoken in 17th-/18th-century colonial Haiti. Other aspects of its grammar seem to have emerged under the influence of African languages, mostly from West and Central Africa. And yet other properties s

Subjects

socio-linguistic | socio-linguistic | creole | creole | caribbean | caribbean | spoken language acquisition | spoken language acquisition | identity | identity | africa | africa | europe | europe | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | haitian | haitian | colony | colony | colonial | colonial | dialect | dialect | grench | grench | new world | new world | slavery | slavery | lexicon | lexicon | pidgin | pidgin | culture | culture | religion | religion | music | music | literature | literature | ethnicity | ethnicity | text | text | syntax | syntax | morphology | morphology | uniformity | uniformity | ebonics | ebonics | africal-american english | africal-american english | gullah | gullah | west indian | west indian

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Mary Leapor

Description

Dr Jennifer Batt talks about Mary Leapor, an 18th Century kitchen maid who wrote accomplished verses and won accolades from literary society. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

poem | #greatwriters | literature | great writers inspire | mary leapor | eighteenth-century | poem | #greatwriters | literature | great writers inspire | mary leapor | eighteenth-century

License

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The Lure of the East: the Oriental and Philosophical Tale in Eighteenth-Century England

Description

Professor Ros Ballaster discusses the objectives of oriental tales published in the second half of the 18th Century which use the sheer power of storytelling to conjure up alternative worlds. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

great writers inspire | eighteenth-century | #greatwriters | oriental | literature | great writers inspire | eighteenth-century | #greatwriters | oriental | literature

License

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21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT) 21H.326 The Making of Russia in the Worlds of Byzantium, Mongolia, and Europe (MIT)

Description

Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s Medieval and early modern Russia stood at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. In this course we will examine some of the native developments and foreign influences which most affected the course of Russian history. Particular topics include the rise of the Kievan State, the Mongol Yoke, the rise of Muscovy, Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, relations with Western Europe. How did foreigners perceive Russia? How did those living in the Russian lands perceive foreigners? What social relations were developing between nobility and peasantry, town and country, women and men? What were the relations of each of these groups to the state? How did state formation come about in Kievan and Muscovite Russia? What were the political, religious, economic, and social factors affecting relations between s

Subjects

Medieval | Medieval | early modern | early modern | Russia | Russia | history | history | Kievan State | Kievan State | Mongol Yoke | Mongol Yoke | Muscovy | Muscovy | Ivan the Terrible | Ivan the Terrible | Peter the Great | Peter the Great | international relations | international relations | Western Europe | Western Europe | politics | religion | economics | social factors | politics | religion | economics | social factors | state | state | society | society | Asia | Asia | foreign influences | foreign influences | foreign relations | foreign relations | Russian history | Russian history | social relations | social relations | nobility | nobility | peasantry | peasantry | town | town | country | country | women | women | men | men | political | political | religious | religious | economic | economic | social factors | social factors | muscovite | muscovite | Kievan Rus? | Kievan Rus? | Kievan civilization | Kievan civilization | Golden Horde | Golden Horde | government | government | time of troubles | time of troubles | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | 17th century | 17th century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 18th century | 18th century | politics | politics | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Smallpox in poetry

Description

Smallpox was rife in the eighteenth century, leaving its mark both on its sufferers, and on the literature of the period. This podcast explores its history in verse. Smallpox was common during the eighteenth-century, and its aftereffects much discussed and lamented in popular literature. This podcast explores its representation in eighteenth-century verse. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

popular culture | eighteenth-century | #greatwriters | disease | smallpox | popular culture | eighteenth-century | #greatwriters | disease | smallpox

License

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The poetry of war

Description

Explores the aesthetics and impact of war poetry in the early eighteenth century, focussing on Joseph Addison's poem, The Campaign. Blood, guts and gore all feature heavily in eighteenth century war poems. This podcast explores the popularity of the early eighteenth-century battle poem. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

eighteenth century | #greatwriters | war | poetry | eighteenth century | #greatwriters | war | poetry

License

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The Ladle: a comic poem

Description

Matthew Prior's The Ladle was one of the most popular poems of the eighteenth century. This podcast explores its appeal. Matthew Prior's The Ladle was hugely popular in the eighteenth century. Based on a story from Ovid, its bawdy tale delighted generations of readers. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Ovid | eighteenth century | popular culture | #greatwriters | poetry | Ovid | eighteenth century | popular culture | #greatwriters | poetry

License

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Music in miscellanies

Description

Much popular music of the eighteenth century is found in poetic miscellanies. But how was it performed? Giles Lewin explores the popular music of the eighteenth century, and the challenges it provides for a modern performer. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

folk music | songs | ballads | #greatwriters | eighteenth century | folk music | songs | ballads | #greatwriters | eighteenth century

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Pastoral Poetry

Description

Introduces the poetry of rural life, and its debt to classical sources. Often idealised, the rural and the rustic play an important part in eighteenth-century poetry. This podcast gives a glimpse into the natural world seen through eighteenth-century eyes. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

rural life | eighteenth century | #greatwriters | poetry | rural life | eighteenth century | #greatwriters | poetry

License

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Politics in poetry

Description

This podcast explores the culture of Jacobitism in the eighteenth century, using a popular ballad. The culture of Jacobite politics took many forms in the eighteenth century. This podcast explores its expression in popular song. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Jacobitism | popular culture | eighteenth century politics | ballads | #greatwriters | Jacobitism | popular culture | eighteenth century politics | ballads | #greatwriters

License

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The life of epigrams

Description

This podcasts introduces the popular eighteenth century epigram. Epigrams were hugely popular in the eighteenth century, and this podcast explores some of their appeal. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

classical literature | eighteenth century | #greatwriters | poetry | verse forms | classical literature | eighteenth century | #greatwriters | poetry | verse forms

License

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Petticoats and fashion

Description

An introduction to the world of fashion and the politics of the petticoat, seen through the poetry of the time. This podcast gives a glimpse into the social and cultural history of fashion in the eighteenth century by looking at the representation of petticoats. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

eighteenth century | fashion | poetry | #greatwriters | eighteenth century | fashion | poetry | #greatwriters

License

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21L.423J Introduction to Anglo-American Folk Music (MIT) 21L.423J Introduction to Anglo-American Folk Music (MIT)

Description

This course examines the production, transmission, preservation and qualities of folk music in the British Isles and North America from the 18th century to the folk revival of the 1960s and the present. There is a special emphasis on balladry, fiddle styles, and African-American influences. The class sings ballads and folk songs from the Child and Lomax collections as well as other sources as we examine them from literary, historical, and musical points of view. Readings supply critical and background materials from a number of sources. Visitors and films bring additional perspectives. This course examines the production, transmission, preservation and qualities of folk music in the British Isles and North America from the 18th century to the folk revival of the 1960s and the present. There is a special emphasis on balladry, fiddle styles, and African-American influences. The class sings ballads and folk songs from the Child and Lomax collections as well as other sources as we examine them from literary, historical, and musical points of view. Readings supply critical and background materials from a number of sources. Visitors and films bring additional perspectives.

Subjects

21L.423 | 21L.423 | 21M.223 | 21M.223 | music production | music production | music transmission | music transmission | music preservation | music preservation | folk music | folk music | British Isles | British Isles | North America | North America | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | 17th century | 17th century | 18th century | 18th century | folk revival | folk revival | balladry | balladry | fiddle styles | fiddle styles | Lomax | Lomax | ballad | ballad | anglo-scottish ballads | anglo-scottish ballads | fiddle | fiddle | the great confluence | the great confluence | appalachia | appalachia

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry - British Poetry and the Sciences of the Mind (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry - British Poetry and the Sciences of the Mind (MIT)

Description

Do poems think? Recurrent images of the poet as an inspired lunatic, and of poetry as a fundamentally irrational art, have often fostered an understanding of poets and their work as generally extraneous to the work of the sciences. Yet poets have long reflected upon and have sought to embody in their work the most elementary processes of mind, and have frequently drawn for these representations on the very sciences to which they are thought to stand - and sometimes do genuinely stand - in opposition. Far from representing a mere departure from reason, then, the poem offers an image of the mind at work, an account of how minds work, a tool for eliciting thought in the reader or auditor. Bringing together readings in British poetry of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with writings fro Do poems think? Recurrent images of the poet as an inspired lunatic, and of poetry as a fundamentally irrational art, have often fostered an understanding of poets and their work as generally extraneous to the work of the sciences. Yet poets have long reflected upon and have sought to embody in their work the most elementary processes of mind, and have frequently drawn for these representations on the very sciences to which they are thought to stand - and sometimes do genuinely stand - in opposition. Far from representing a mere departure from reason, then, the poem offers an image of the mind at work, an account of how minds work, a tool for eliciting thought in the reader or auditor. Bringing together readings in British poetry of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with writings fro

Subjects

poems | poems | think | think | images | images | poet | poet | lunatic | lunatic | irrational | irrational | art | art | sciences | sciences | processes of mind | processes of mind | reason | reason | mind | mind | thought | thought | British | British | eighteenth | eighteenth | nineteenth | nineteenth | centuries | centuries | psychology | psychology | physiology | physiology | brain | brain | interdisciplinary course | interdisciplinary course | lyric | lyric | didactic | didactic | cognition | cognition | medicine | medicine | literary study | literary study | humanistic research | humanistic research

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic This course studies several important examples of the genre that between the early 18th century and the end of the 20th has come to seem the definitive literary form for representing and coming to terms with modernity. Syllabi vary, but the class usually attempts to convey a sense of the form's development over the past few centuries. Among topics likely to be considered are: developments in narrative technique, the novel's relation to history, national versus linguistic definitions of an "English" novel, social criticism in the novel, realism versus "romance," the novel's construction of subjectivities. Writers studied have included Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Lawrence Sterne, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Walter Scott, Emily and Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dic

Subjects

English literature | English literature | Novel | Novel | 18th century | 18th century | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | Eighteenth | Eighteenth | Nineteenth | Nineteenth | Twentieth | Twentieth | Modernity | Modernity | Narrative | Narrative | Social criticism | Social criticism | Realism | Realism | Romance | Romance | Romantic | Romantic | Subjectivity | Subjectivity | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Emily Bront? | Emily Bront? | Charles Dickens | Charles Dickens | George Eliot | George Eliot | James Joyce | James Joyce | Salman Rushdie | Salman Rushdie | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing. In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | artificial | artificial | intelligence | intelligence | feedback | feedback | mechanism | mechanism | speculative | speculative | thought | thought | intelligent | intelligent | agency | agency | systems | systems | design | design | pre-Darwinian | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | natural | history | history | conscious | conscious | selection | selection | chance | chance | unconscious | unconscious | philosophy | philosophy | human | human | Adam Smith | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | intellectual | self-guiding | self-guiding | self-sustaining | self-sustaining | nature | nature | unintelligent | unintelligent | mechanical | mechanical | argument | argument | evolution | evolution | creation | creation | creationism | creationism | ethics | ethics | ethical | ethical | values | values | On the Origin of Species | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | model | model | existence | existence | objects | objects | designer | designer | purpose | purpose | literary texts | literary texts | philosophical texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | Western tradition | intellectual history | intellectual history | life | life | planet | planet | natural history | natural history | material universe | material universe | theory of natural selection | theory of natural selection | argument from design | argument from design | organisms | organisms | human design | human design | conscious agency | conscious agency | unconscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739 | Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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