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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT) Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance. This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | electrical conductivity | doping | doping | transistors | transistors | photodectors | photodectors | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | luminescence | luminescence | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | lasers | lasers | optical phenomena | optical phenomena | photonics | photonics | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | magnetoresistance | electrical devices | electrical devices | optical devices | optical devices | magnetic devices | magnetic devices | materials | materials | device applications | device applications

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT) Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. The class uses a device-motivated approach which emphasizes emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance. This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. The class uses a device-motivated approach which emphasizes emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | electrical conductivity | doping | doping | transistors | transistors | photodectors | photodectors | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | luminescence | luminescence | light emitting diodes | light emitting diodes | lasers | lasers | optical phenomena | optical phenomena | photonics | photonics | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | magnetoresistance

License

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. It features a device-motivated approach which places strong emphasis on emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | doping | transistors | photodectors | photovoltaics | luminescence | light emitting diodes | lasers | optical phenomena | photonics | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance | electrical devices | optical devices | magnetic devices | materials | device applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.012 Microelectronic Devices and Circuits (MIT) 6.012 Microelectronic Devices and Circuits (MIT)

Description

6.012 is the header course for the department's "Devices, Circuits and Systems" concentration. The topics covered include: modeling of microelectronic devices, basic microelectronic circuit analysis and design, physical electronics of semiconductor junction and MOS devices, relation of electrical behavior to internal physical processes, development of circuit models, and understanding the uses and limitations of various models. The course uses incremental and large-signal techniques to analyze and design bipolar and field effect transistor circuits, with examples chosen from digital circuits, single-ended and differential linear amplifiers, and other integrated circuits. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.012 is the header course for the department's "Devices, Circuits and Systems" concentration. The topics covered include: modeling of microelectronic devices, basic microelectronic circuit analysis and design, physical electronics of semiconductor junction and MOS devices, relation of electrical behavior to internal physical processes, development of circuit models, and understanding the uses and limitations of various models. The course uses incremental and large-signal techniques to analyze and design bipolar and field effect transistor circuits, with examples chosen from digital circuits, single-ended and differential linear amplifiers, and other integrated circuits. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microelectronic device | microelectronic device | circuit | circuit | design | design | physical electronics | physical electronics | semiconductor junction | semiconductor junction | MOS device | MOS device | electrical behavior | electrical behavior | incremental technique | incremental technique | large-signal technique | large-signal technique | bipolar transistor | bipolar transistor | field effect transistor | field effect transistor | digital circuit | digital circuit | single-ended amplifier | single-ended amplifier | differential linear amplifier | differential linear amplifier | integrated circuit | integrated circuit

License

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18.306 Advanced Partial Differential Equations with Applications (MIT) 18.306 Advanced Partial Differential Equations with Applications (MIT)

Description

This course presents the concepts and techniques for solving partial differential equations (pde), with emphasis on nonlinear pde. This course presents the concepts and techniques for solving partial differential equations (pde), with emphasis on nonlinear pde.

Subjects

partial differential equations (pde) | partial differential equations (pde) | nonlinear pde | nonlinear pde | Diffusion | Diffusion | dispersion | dispersion | Initial and boundary value problems | Initial and boundary value problems | Characteristics and shocks | Characteristics and shocks | Separation of variables | Separation of variables | transform methods | transform methods | Green's functions | Green's functions | Asymptotics | Asymptotics | geometrical theory | geometrical theory | Dimensional analysis | Dimensional analysis | self-similarity | self-similarity | traveling waves | traveling waves | Singular perturbation and boundary layers | Singular perturbation and boundary layers | Solitons | Solitons | Variational methods | Variational methods | Free-boundary problems | Free-boundary problems | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | electrical engineering | electrical engineering | mechanical engineering | mechanical engineering | materials science | materials science | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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BE.430J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT) BE.430J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (MIT)

Description

This course covers the following topics: conduction, diffusion, convection in electrolytes; fields in heterogeneous media; electrical double layers; Maxwell stress tensor and electrical forces in physiological systems; and fluid and solid continua: equations of motion useful for porous, hydrated biological tissues. Case studies considered include membrane transport; electrode interfaces; electrical, mechanical, and chemical transduction in tissues; electrophoretic and electroosmotic flows; diffusion/reaction; and ECG. The course also examines electromechanical and physicochemical interactions in biomaterials and cells; orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and other clinical examples. This course covers the following topics: conduction, diffusion, convection in electrolytes; fields in heterogeneous media; electrical double layers; Maxwell stress tensor and electrical forces in physiological systems; and fluid and solid continua: equations of motion useful for porous, hydrated biological tissues. Case studies considered include membrane transport; electrode interfaces; electrical, mechanical, and chemical transduction in tissues; electrophoretic and electroosmotic flows; diffusion/reaction; and ECG. The course also examines electromechanical and physicochemical interactions in biomaterials and cells; orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and other clinical examples.

Subjects

biomaterials | biomaterials | conduction | conduction | diffusion | diffusion | convection in electrolytes | convection in electrolytes | fields in heterogeneous media | fields in heterogeneous media | electrical double layers | electrical double layers | Maxwell stress tensor | Maxwell stress tensor | fluid and solid continua | fluid and solid continua | biological tissues | biological tissues | membrane transport | membrane transport | electrode | electrode | transduction | transduction | electrophoretic flow | electrophoretic flow | electroosmotic flow | electroosmotic flow | diffusion reaction | diffusion reaction | ECG | ECG | orthopaedic | cardiovascular | orthopaedic | cardiovascular | 2.795J | 2.795J | 2.795 | 2.795 | 6.561J | 6.561J | 6.561 | 6.561 | 10.539J | 10.539J | 10.539 | 10.539 | HST.544J | HST.544J | HST.544 | HST.544

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6.021J Quantitative Physiology: Cells and Tissues (MIT) 6.021J Quantitative Physiology: Cells and Tissues (MIT)

Description

This course is jointly offered through four departments, available to both undergraduates and graduates. This course introduces the principles of mass transport and electrical signal generation for biological membranes, cells, and tissues. Topics covered include: mass transport through membranes (diffusion, osmosis, chemically mediated, and active transport), electric properties of cells (ion transport), equilibrium, resting, and action potentials, kinetic and molecular properties of single voltage-gated ion channels. Laboratory and computer exercises illustrate the course concepts. Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files f This course is jointly offered through four departments, available to both undergraduates and graduates. This course introduces the principles of mass transport and electrical signal generation for biological membranes, cells, and tissues. Topics covered include: mass transport through membranes (diffusion, osmosis, chemically mediated, and active transport), electric properties of cells (ion transport), equilibrium, resting, and action potentials, kinetic and molecular properties of single voltage-gated ion channels. Laboratory and computer exercises illustrate the course concepts. Students engage in extensive written and oral communication exercises. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files f

Subjects

quantitative physiology | quantitative physiology | cells | cells | tissues | tissues | mass transport | mass transport | electrical signal generation | electrical signal generation | biological membranes | biological membranes | membranes | membranes | diffusion | diffusion | osmosis | osmosis | chemically mediated transport | chemically mediated transport | active transport | active transport | ion transport | ion transport | 6.021 | 6.021 | 2.791 | 2.791 | 2.794 | 2.794 | 6.521 | 6.521 | BE.370 | BE.370 | BE.470 | BE.470 | HST.541 | HST.541

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BE.410J Molecular, Cellular and Tissue Biomechanics (MIT) BE.410J Molecular, Cellular and Tissue Biomechanics (MIT)

Description

This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include: structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. Experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels will also be investigated.This course was originally co-developed by Professors Alan Grodzinsky, Roger Kamm, and L. Mahadevan. This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include: structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. Experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels will also be investigated.This course was originally co-developed by Professors Alan Grodzinsky, Roger Kamm, and L. Mahadevan.

Subjects

Scaling laws | Scaling laws | continuum mechanics | continuum mechanics | biomechanical phenomena | biomechanical phenomena | length scales | length scales | tissue structure | tissue structure | molecular basis for macroscopic properties | molecular basis for macroscopic properties | chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior | chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior | cell mechanics | motility and adhesion | cell mechanics | motility and adhesion | biomembranes | biomembranes | biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors | biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors | Experimental methods | Experimental methods | 2.798J | 2.798J | 6.524J | 6.524J | 10.537 | 10.537 | BE.410 | BE.410 | 2.798 | 2.798 | 6.524 | 6.524

License

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6.012 Microelectronic Devices and Circuits (MIT) 6.012 Microelectronic Devices and Circuits (MIT)

Description

6.012 is the header course for the department's "Devices, Circuits and Systems" concentration. The topics covered include: modeling of microelectronic devices, basic microelectronic circuit analysis and design, physical electronics of semiconductor junction and MOS devices, relation of electrical behavior to internal physical processes, development of circuit models, and understanding the uses and limitations of various models. The course uses incremental and large-signal techniques to analyze and design bipolar and field effect transistor circuits, with examples chosen from digital circuits, single-ended and differential linear amplifiers, and other integrated circuits. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.012 is the header course for the department's "Devices, Circuits and Systems" concentration. The topics covered include: modeling of microelectronic devices, basic microelectronic circuit analysis and design, physical electronics of semiconductor junction and MOS devices, relation of electrical behavior to internal physical processes, development of circuit models, and understanding the uses and limitations of various models. The course uses incremental and large-signal techniques to analyze and design bipolar and field effect transistor circuits, with examples chosen from digital circuits, single-ended and differential linear amplifiers, and other integrated circuits. This course is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microelectronic device | microelectronic device | circuit | circuit | design | design | physical electronics | physical electronics | semiconductor junction | semiconductor junction | MOS device | MOS device | electrical behavior | electrical behavior | incremental technique | incremental technique | large-signal technique | large-signal technique | bipolar transistor | bipolar transistor | field effect transistor | field effect transistor | digital circuit | digital circuit | single-ended amplifier | single-ended amplifier | differential linear amplifier | differential linear amplifier | integrated circuit | integrated circuit

License

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2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT) 2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT)

Description

This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. Mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices. Analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations and state-determined systems. Laplace transforms, transfer functions. Frequency response, Bode plots. Vibrations, modal analysis. Open- and closed-loop control, instability. Time-domain controller design, introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications.Technical RequirementsQuickTime® Player software is required to view the .mov files found on this course site. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. Mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices. Analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations and state-determined systems. Laplace transforms, transfer functions. Frequency response, Bode plots. Vibrations, modal analysis. Open- and closed-loop control, instability. Time-domain controller design, introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications.Technical RequirementsQuickTime® Player software is required to view the .mov files found on this course site.

Subjects

electro-mechanical devices | electro-mechanical devices | electrical circuits | electrical circuits | uniaxial rotation | uniaxial rotation | Mechanical translation | Mechanical translation | linear differential equations | linear differential equations

License

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2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT) 2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered.

Subjects

modeling | modeling | analysis | analysis | dynamic | dynamic | systems | systems | mechanical | mechanical | translation | translation | uniaxial | uniaxial | rotation | rotation | electrical | electrical | circuits | circuits | coupling | coupling | levers | levers | gears | gears | electro-mechanical | electro-mechanical | devices | devices | linear | linear | differential | differential | equations | equations | state-determined | state-determined | Laplace | Laplace | transforms | transforms | transfer | transfer | functions | functions | frequency | frequency | response | response | Bode | Bode | vibrations | vibrations | modal | modal | open-loop | open-loop | closed-loop | closed-loop | control | control | instability | instability | time-domain | time-domain | controller | controller | frequency-domain | frequency-domain

License

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2.004 Dynamics and Control II (MIT) 2.004 Dynamics and Control II (MIT)

Description

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Create lumped parameter models (expressed as ODEs) of simple dynamic systems in the electrical and mechanical energy domains Make quantitative estimates of model parameters from experimental measurements Obtain the time-domain response of linear systems to initial conditions and/or common forcing functions (specifically; impulse, step and ramp input) by both analytical and computational methods Obtain the frequency-domain response of linear systems to sinusoidal inputs Compensate the transient response of dynamic systems using feedback techniques Design, implement and test an active control system to achieve a desired performance measure Mastery of these topics will be assessed via homework, quizzes/exams, and lab assig Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Create lumped parameter models (expressed as ODEs) of simple dynamic systems in the electrical and mechanical energy domains Make quantitative estimates of model parameters from experimental measurements Obtain the time-domain response of linear systems to initial conditions and/or common forcing functions (specifically; impulse, step and ramp input) by both analytical and computational methods Obtain the frequency-domain response of linear systems to sinusoidal inputs Compensate the transient response of dynamic systems using feedback techniques Design, implement and test an active control system to achieve a desired performance measure Mastery of these topics will be assessed via homework, quizzes/exams, and lab assig

Subjects

Laplace transform | Laplace transform | transform function | transform function | electrical and mechanical systems | electrical and mechanical systems | pole-zero diagram | pole-zero diagram | linearization | linearization | block diagrams | block diagrams | feedback control systems | feedback control systems | stability | stability | root-locus plot | root-locus plot | compensation | compensation | Bode plot | Bode plot | state space representation | state space representation | minimum time | minimum time

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2.004 Systems, Modeling, and Control II (MIT) 2.004 Systems, Modeling, and Control II (MIT)

Description

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:Create lumped parameter models (expressed as ODEs) of simple dynamic systems in the electrical and mechanical energy domainsMake quantitative estimates of model parameters from experimental measurementsObtain the time-domain response of linear systems to initial conditions and/or common forcing functions (specifically; impulse, step and ramp input) by both analytical and computational methodsObtain the frequency-domain response of linear systems to sinusoidal inputsCompensate the transient response of dynamic systems using feedback techniquesDesign, implement and test an active control system to achieve a desired performance measureMastery of these topics will be assessed via homework, quizzes/exams, and lab assignments. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:Create lumped parameter models (expressed as ODEs) of simple dynamic systems in the electrical and mechanical energy domainsMake quantitative estimates of model parameters from experimental measurementsObtain the time-domain response of linear systems to initial conditions and/or common forcing functions (specifically; impulse, step and ramp input) by both analytical and computational methodsObtain the frequency-domain response of linear systems to sinusoidal inputsCompensate the transient response of dynamic systems using feedback techniquesDesign, implement and test an active control system to achieve a desired performance measureMastery of these topics will be assessed via homework, quizzes/exams, and lab assignments.

Subjects

Laplace transform | Laplace transform | transform function | transform function | electrical and mechanical systems | electrical and mechanical systems | pole-zero diagram | pole-zero diagram | linearization | linearization | block diagrams | block diagrams | feedback control systems | feedback control systems | stability | stability | root-locus plot | root-locus plot | compensation | compensation | Bode plot | Bode plot | state space representation | state space representation | minimum time | minimum time

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2.996 Biomedical Devices Design Laboratory (MIT) 2.996 Biomedical Devices Design Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course provides intensive coverage of the theory and practice of electromechanical instrument design with application to biomedical devices. Students will work with MGH doctors to develop new medical products from concept to prototype development and testing. Lectures will present techniques for designing electronic circuits as part of complete sensor systems. Topics covered include: basic electronics circuits, principles of accuracy, op amp circuits, analog signal conditioning, power supplies, microprocessors, wireless communications, sensors, and sensor interface circuits. Labs will cover practical printed circuit board (PCB) design including component selection, PCB layout, assembly, and planning and budgeting for large projects. Problem sets and labs in the first six weeks are in This course provides intensive coverage of the theory and practice of electromechanical instrument design with application to biomedical devices. Students will work with MGH doctors to develop new medical products from concept to prototype development and testing. Lectures will present techniques for designing electronic circuits as part of complete sensor systems. Topics covered include: basic electronics circuits, principles of accuracy, op amp circuits, analog signal conditioning, power supplies, microprocessors, wireless communications, sensors, and sensor interface circuits. Labs will cover practical printed circuit board (PCB) design including component selection, PCB layout, assembly, and planning and budgeting for large projects. Problem sets and labs in the first six weeks are in

Subjects

biomedical devices | biomedical devices | electrical engineering in medicine | electrical engineering in medicine | basic electronic circuits | basic electronic circuits | op amp | op amp | op amp circuits | op amp circuits | analog signal conditioning | analog signal conditioning | microprocessors | microprocessors | wireless communication | wireless communication | PCB design | PCB design | printed circuit board | printed circuit board | microprocessor programming | microprocessor programming

License

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2.882 System Design and Analysis based on AD and Complexity Theories (MIT) 2.882 System Design and Analysis based on AD and Complexity Theories (MIT)

Description

This course studies what makes a good design and how one develops a good design. Students consider how the design of engineered systems (such as hardware, software, materials, and manufacturing systems) differ from the "design" of natural systems such as biological systems; discuss complexity and how one makes use of complexity theory to improve design; and discover how one uses axiomatic design theory (AD theory) in design of many different kinds of engineered systems. Questions are analyzed using Axiomatic Design Theory and Complexity Theory. Case studies are presented including the design of machines, tribological systems, materials, manufacturing systems, and recent inventions. Implications of AD and complexity theories on biological systems discussed. This course studies what makes a good design and how one develops a good design. Students consider how the design of engineered systems (such as hardware, software, materials, and manufacturing systems) differ from the "design" of natural systems such as biological systems; discuss complexity and how one makes use of complexity theory to improve design; and discover how one uses axiomatic design theory (AD theory) in design of many different kinds of engineered systems. Questions are analyzed using Axiomatic Design Theory and Complexity Theory. Case studies are presented including the design of machines, tribological systems, materials, manufacturing systems, and recent inventions. Implications of AD and complexity theories on biological systems discussed.

Subjects

information content | information content | electrical connector | electrical connector | constraint | constraint | complexity | complexity | manufacturing | manufacturing | design | design | functional requirement | functional requirement | requirement | requirement | tradeoff | tradeoff | optimization | optimization | engineered systems | engineered systems | natural systems | natural systems | complexity theory | complexity theory | axiomatic design | axiomatic design | tribology | tribology | tribological systems | tribological systems | manufacturing systems | manufacturing systems | biological systems | biological systems

License

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2.800 Tribology (MIT) 2.800 Tribology (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the design of tribological systems: the interfaces between two or more bodies in relative motion. Fundamental topics include: geometric, chemical, and physical characterization of surfaces; friction and wear mechanisms for metals, polymers, and ceramics, including abrasive wear, delamination theory, tool wear, erosive wear, wear of polymers and composites; and boundary lubrication and solid-film lubrication. The course also considers the relationship between nano-tribology and macro-tribology, rolling contacts, tribological problems in magnetic recording and electrical contacts, and monitoring and diagnosis of friction and wear. Case studies are used to illustrate key points. This course addresses the design of tribological systems: the interfaces between two or more bodies in relative motion. Fundamental topics include: geometric, chemical, and physical characterization of surfaces; friction and wear mechanisms for metals, polymers, and ceramics, including abrasive wear, delamination theory, tool wear, erosive wear, wear of polymers and composites; and boundary lubrication and solid-film lubrication. The course also considers the relationship between nano-tribology and macro-tribology, rolling contacts, tribological problems in magnetic recording and electrical contacts, and monitoring and diagnosis of friction and wear. Case studies are used to illustrate key points.

Subjects

tribology | tribology | surfaces | surfaces | interface | interface | friction | friction | wear | wear | metal | metal | polymer | polymer | ceramics | ceramics | abrasive wear | abrasive wear | delamination theory | delamination theory | tool wear | tool wear | erosive wear | erosive wear | composites | composites | boundary lubrication | boundary lubrication | solid-film lubrication. nano-tribology | solid-film lubrication. nano-tribology | macro-tribology | macro-tribology | rolling contacts | rolling contacts | magnetic recording | magnetic recording | electrical contact | electrical contact | connector | connector | axiomatic design | axiomatic design | traction | traction | seals | seals | solid-film lubrication | solid-film lubrication | nano-tribology | nano-tribology

License

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6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT) 6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Electric power systems are also at the heart of alternative energy systems, including wind and solar electric, geothermal and small scale hydroelectric generation. This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Electric power systems are also at the heart of alternative energy systems, including wind and solar electric, geothermal and small scale hydroelectric generation.

Subjects

electric power systems | electric power systems | energy conversion | energy conversion | electrical energy | electrical energy | mechanical energy | mechanical energy | electric transportation | electric transportation | alternative energy | alternative energy | electric circuits | electric circuits | magnetic field devices | magnetic field devices | lumped parameter electromechanics | lumped parameter electromechanics

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6.012 Microelectronic Devices and Circuits (MIT) 6.012 Microelectronic Devices and Circuits (MIT)

Description

6.012 is the header course for the department's "Devices, Circuits and Systems" concentration. The topics covered include: modeling of microelectronic devices, basic microelectronic circuit analysis and design, physical electronics of semiconductor junction and MOS devices, relation of electrical behavior to internal physical processes, development of circuit models, and understanding the uses and limitations of various models. The course uses incremental and large-signal techniques to analyze and design bipolar and field effect transistor circuits, with examples chosen from digital circuits, single-ended and differential linear amplifiers, and other integrated circuits. This course is 12 units and is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.012 is the header course for the department's "Devices, Circuits and Systems" concentration. The topics covered include: modeling of microelectronic devices, basic microelectronic circuit analysis and design, physical electronics of semiconductor junction and MOS devices, relation of electrical behavior to internal physical processes, development of circuit models, and understanding the uses and limitations of various models. The course uses incremental and large-signal techniques to analyze and design bipolar and field effect transistor circuits, with examples chosen from digital circuits, single-ended and differential linear amplifiers, and other integrated circuits. This course is 12 units and is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

microelectronic device | microelectronic device | circuit | circuit | design | design | physical electronics | physical electronics | semiconductor junction | semiconductor junction | MOS device | MOS device | electrical behavior | electrical behavior | incremental technique | incremental technique | large-signal technique | large-signal technique | bipolar transistor | bipolar transistor | field effect transistor | field effect transistor | digital circuit | digital circuit | single-ended amplifier | single-ended amplifier | differential linear amplifier | differential linear amplifier | integrated circuit | integrated circuit

License

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6.021J Quantitative Physiology: Cells and Tissues (MIT) 6.021J Quantitative Physiology: Cells and Tissues (MIT)

Description

In this subject, we consider two basic topics in cellular biophysics, posed here as questions: Which molecules are transported across cellular membranes, and what are the mechanisms of transport? How do cells maintain their compositions, volume, and membrane potential? How are potentials generated across the membranes of cells? What do these potentials do? Although the questions posed are fundamentally biological questions, the methods for answering these questions are inherently multidisciplinary. As we will see throughout the course, the role of mathematical models is to express concepts precisely enough that precise conclusions can be drawn. In connection with all the topics covered, we will consider both theory and experiment. For the student, the educational value of examining the i In this subject, we consider two basic topics in cellular biophysics, posed here as questions: Which molecules are transported across cellular membranes, and what are the mechanisms of transport? How do cells maintain their compositions, volume, and membrane potential? How are potentials generated across the membranes of cells? What do these potentials do? Although the questions posed are fundamentally biological questions, the methods for answering these questions are inherently multidisciplinary. As we will see throughout the course, the role of mathematical models is to express concepts precisely enough that precise conclusions can be drawn. In connection with all the topics covered, we will consider both theory and experiment. For the student, the educational value of examining the i

Subjects

quantitative physiology | quantitative physiology | cells | cells | tissues | tissues | mass transport | mass transport | electrical signal generation | electrical signal generation | biological membranes | biological membranes | membranes | membranes | diffusion | diffusion | osmosis | osmosis | chemically mediated transport | chemically mediated transport | active transport | active transport | ion transport | ion transport | equilibrium potential | equilibrium potential | resting potential | resting potential | action potential | action potential | voltage-gated ion channels | voltage-gated ion channels | 6.021 | 6.021 | 2.791 | 2.791 | 2.794 | 2.794 | 6.521 | 6.521 | 20.370 | 20.370 | 20.470 | 20.470 | HST.541 | HST.541

License

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16.50 Introduction to Propulsion Systems (MIT) 16.50 Introduction to Propulsion Systems (MIT)

Description

This course presents aerospace propulsive devices as systems, with functional requirements and engineering and environmental limitations along with requirements and limitations that constrain design choices. Both air-breathing and rocket engines are covered, at a level which enables rational integration of the propulsive system into an overall vehicle design. Mission analysis, fundamental performance relations, and exemplary design solutions are presented. This course presents aerospace propulsive devices as systems, with functional requirements and engineering and environmental limitations along with requirements and limitations that constrain design choices. Both air-breathing and rocket engines are covered, at a level which enables rational integration of the propulsive system into an overall vehicle design. Mission analysis, fundamental performance relations, and exemplary design solutions are presented.

Subjects

gas turbines | gas turbines | propulsion | propulsion | rockets | rockets | rocket engines | rocket engines | air-breathing engines | air-breathing engines | turbomachines | turbomachines | aeroengines | aeroengines | turbines | turbines | aircraft engines | aircraft engines | turbofans | turbofans | thrusters | thrusters | combustion turbine | combustion turbine | turbojets | turbojets | turboprops | turboprops | chemical propulsion | chemical propulsion | electrical propulsion | electrical propulsion | rocket nozzles | rocket nozzles

License

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20.410J Molecular, Cellular and Tissue Biomechanics (BE.410J) (MIT) 20.410J Molecular, Cellular and Tissue Biomechanics (BE.410J) (MIT)

Description

This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include: structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. Experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels will also be investigated. This course was originally co-developed by Professors Alan Grodzinsky, Roger Kamm, and L. Mahadevan. This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales. Topics include: structure of tissues and the molecular basis for macroscopic properties; chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior; cell mechanics, motility and adhesion; biomembranes; biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors. Experimental methods for probing structures at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels will also be investigated. This course was originally co-developed by Professors Alan Grodzinsky, Roger Kamm, and L. Mahadevan.

Subjects

Scaling laws | Scaling laws | continuum mechanics | continuum mechanics | biomechanical phenomena | biomechanical phenomena | length scales | length scales | tissue structure | tissue structure | molecular basis for macroscopic properties | molecular basis for macroscopic properties | chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior | chemical and electrical effects on mechanical behavior | cell mechanics | motility and adhesion | cell mechanics | motility and adhesion | biomembranes | biomembranes | biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors | biomolecular mechanics and molecular motors | Experimental methods | Experimental methods | BE.410J | BE.410J | BE.410 | BE.410 | 2.798 | 2.798 | 6.524 | 6.524

License

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20.430J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (BE.430J) (MIT) 20.430J Fields, Forces, and Flows in Biological Systems (BE.430J) (MIT)

Description

This course covers the following topics: conduction, diffusion, convection in electrolytes; fields in heterogeneous media; electrical double layers; Maxwell stress tensor and electrical forces in physiological systems; and fluid and solid continua: equations of motion useful for porous, hydrated biological tissues. Case studies considered include membrane transport; electrode interfaces; electrical, mechanical, and chemical transduction in tissues; electrophoretic and electroosmotic flows; diffusion/reaction; and ECG. The course also examines electromechanical and physicochemical interactions in biomaterials and cells; orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and other clinical examples. This course covers the following topics: conduction, diffusion, convection in electrolytes; fields in heterogeneous media; electrical double layers; Maxwell stress tensor and electrical forces in physiological systems; and fluid and solid continua: equations of motion useful for porous, hydrated biological tissues. Case studies considered include membrane transport; electrode interfaces; electrical, mechanical, and chemical transduction in tissues; electrophoretic and electroosmotic flows; diffusion/reaction; and ECG. The course also examines electromechanical and physicochemical interactions in biomaterials and cells; orthopaedic, cardiovascular, and other clinical examples.

Subjects

biomaterials | biomaterials | conduction | conduction | diffusion | diffusion | convection in electrolytes | convection in electrolytes | fields in heterogeneous media | fields in heterogeneous media | electrical double layers | electrical double layers | Maxwell stress tensor | Maxwell stress tensor | fluid and solid continua | fluid and solid continua | biological tissues | biological tissues | membrane transport | membrane transport | electrode | electrode | transduction | transduction | electrophoretic flow | electrophoretic flow | electroosmotic flow | electroosmotic flow | diffusion reaction | diffusion reaction | ECG | ECG | orthopaedic | cardiovascular | orthopaedic | cardiovascular | 20.430 | 20.430 | 2.795 | 2.795 | 6.561 | 6.561 | 10.539 | 10.539 | HST.544 | HST.544

License

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MAS.965 Special Topics in Media Technology: Cooperative Machines (MIT) MAS.965 Special Topics in Media Technology: Cooperative Machines (MIT)

Description

This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building machines that cooperate with humans and with other machines. Philosophical, scientific, and theoretical insights into this subject will be covered, as well as how these ideas are manifest in both natural and artificial systems (e.g. software agents and robots). This course examines the issues, principles, and challenges toward building machines that cooperate with humans and with other machines. Philosophical, scientific, and theoretical insights into this subject will be covered, as well as how these ideas are manifest in both natural and artificial systems (e.g. software agents and robots).

Subjects

cooperative machines | cooperative machines | robotics | robotics | electrical engineering | electrical engineering | manufacture | manufacture | human interaction | human interaction | perception | perception | emotion | emotion | theory of mind | theory of mind | behavior and the mind | behavior and the mind | robots | robots | human-machine collaboration | human-machine collaboration | intention and action | intention and action | teamwork | teamwork

License

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Magnetic Materials and Devices (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationships which exist between the performance of electrical, optical, and magnetic devices and the microstructural characteristics of the materials from which they are constructed. The class uses a device-motivated approach which emphasizes emerging technologies. Device applications of physical phenomena are considered, including electrical conductivity and doping, transistors, photodetectors and photovoltaics, luminescence, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical phenomena, photonics, ferromagnetism, and magnetoresistance.

Subjects

electrical | optical | and magnetic devices | microstructural characteristics of materials | device-motivated approach | emerging technologies | physical phenomena | electrical conductivity | doping | transistors | photodectors | photovoltaics | luminescence | light emitting diodes | lasers | optical phenomena | photonics | ferromagnetism | magnetoresistance

License

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Transient responses : laplace transforms : electrical and electronic principles : presentation transcript

Description

This open educational resource was released through the Higher Education Academy Engineering Subject Centre Open Engineering Resources Pilot project. The project was funded by HEFCE and the JISC/HE Academy UKOER programme.

Subjects

capacitor voltage | oer | second order equations | algebra | beng | electrical | laplace transformation | rcl network | laplace transforms | charge | engscoer | ukoer | circuit | engsc | electronics | function | newportunioer | transient responses | capacitor | hn | voltage | newport | electrical and electronic principals | exponential charge up | equations | university of wales | laplace | rc network | foundation degree | engineering | 2009 | calculus | circuit theory | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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