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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT) 3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electron | electronic properties | electronic properties | magnetism | magnetism | magentic properties | magentic properties | structure | structure | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | phonon | quantum | quantum | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | radiation | radiation | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | polymer | polymer | glass | glass | corrosion | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT) 3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electron | electronic properties | electronic properties | magnetism | magnetism | magentic properties | magentic properties | structure | structure | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | phonon | quantum | quantum | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | radiation | radiation | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | polymer | polymer | glass | glass | corrosion | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.701 Introduction to Nanoelectronics (MIT) 6.701 Introduction to Nanoelectronics (MIT)

Description

Traditionally, progress in electronics has been driven by miniaturization. But as electronic devices approach the molecular scale, classical models for device behavior must be abandoned. To prepare for the next generation of electronic devices, this class teaches the theory of current, voltage and resistance from atoms up. To describe electrons at the nanoscale, we will begin with an introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics, including quantization, the wave-particle duality, wavefunctions and Schrödinger's equation. Then we will consider the electronic properties of molecules, carbon nanotubes and crystals, including energy band formation and the origin of metals, insulators and semiconductors. Electron conduction will be taught beginning with ballistic transport and concludin Traditionally, progress in electronics has been driven by miniaturization. But as electronic devices approach the molecular scale, classical models for device behavior must be abandoned. To prepare for the next generation of electronic devices, this class teaches the theory of current, voltage and resistance from atoms up. To describe electrons at the nanoscale, we will begin with an introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics, including quantization, the wave-particle duality, wavefunctions and Schrödinger's equation. Then we will consider the electronic properties of molecules, carbon nanotubes and crystals, including energy band formation and the origin of metals, insulators and semiconductors. Electron conduction will be taught beginning with ballistic transport and concludin

Subjects

nanoelectronics | nanoelectronics | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | wave-particle duality | wave-particle duality | Schrodinger's equation | Schrodinger's equation | electronic properties of molecules | electronic properties of molecules | energy band formation | energy band formation | electron conduction | electron conduction | ballistic transport | ballistic transport | Ohm's law | Ohm's law | fundamental limits to computation | fundamental limits to computation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electronic properties | magnetism | magentic properties | structure | crystal | lattice | energy | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | quantum | quantum mechanics | radiation | battery | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | polymer | glass | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

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6.701 Introduction to Nanoelectronics (MIT)

Description

Traditionally, progress in electronics has been driven by miniaturization. But as electronic devices approach the molecular scale, classical models for device behavior must be abandoned. To prepare for the next generation of electronic devices, this class teaches the theory of current, voltage and resistance from atoms up. To describe electrons at the nanoscale, we will begin with an introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics, including quantization, the wave-particle duality, wavefunctions and SchrŲdinger's equation. Then we will consider the electronic properties of molecules, carbon nanotubes and crystals, including energy band formation and the origin of metals, insulators and semiconductors. Electron conduction will be taught beginning with ballistic transport and concludin

Subjects

nanoelectronics | quantum mechanics | wave-particle duality | Schrodinger's equation | electronic properties of molecules | energy band formation | electron conduction | ballistic transport | Ohm's law | fundamental limits to computation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electronic properties | magnetism | magentic properties | structure | crystal | lattice | energy | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | quantum | quantum mechanics | radiation | battery | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | polymer | glass | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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