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Sex in a Shifting Landscape Lecture Two:Oxford Uehiro Lectures 2012

Description

Second lecture in the 2012 Uehiro Lecture series 'Sex in A Shifting Landscape'. After a hundred and fifty years of feminism, we are still struggling to achieve a satisfactory legal and social framework for managing the relations of the sexes. This is partly, of course, because so many men have been unwilling to give up their traditional privileges, and the original feminist project is still far from finished. But more fundamentally than that, we have no clear conception of what a fair arrangement would be. You can regard some kinds of inequality as definitely unjust while being in considerable doubt about others. And even if we ever thought we had reached an ideal solution, the endlessly shifting landscape of technological change would soon throw things into turmoil. Reproductive technol Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | climate change | philosophy | inequality | sexism | emancipation | ethics | feminism | uehiro | climate change | philosophy | inequality | sexism | emancipation | ethics | feminism | 2012-11-21

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Sex in a Shifting Landscape Lecture One: Oxford Uehiro Lectures 2012

Description

Professor Janet Radcliffe-Richards gives (OUC Distinguished Research Fellow) gives the first of three lectures on feminism for the Uehiro Practical Ethics lecture series. After a hundred and fifty years of feminism, we are still struggling to achieve a satisfactory legal and social framework for managing the relations of the sexes. This is partly, of course, because so many men have been unwilling to give up their traditional privileges, and the original feminist project is still far from finished. But more fundamentally than that, we have no clear conception of what a fair arrangement would be. You can regard some kinds of inequality as definitely unjust while being in considerable doubt about others. And even if we ever thought we had reached an ideal solution, the endlessly shifting lan Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | philosophy | john stuart mill | sexism | emancipation | ethics | feminism | uehiro | philosophy | john stuart mill | sexism | emancipation | ethics | feminism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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? The Caribbean after Slavery.

Description

Professor Gad Heuman, University of Warwick delivers the 2013 David Nicholls Memorial Trust Lecture. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human rights | emancipation | Caribbean | slavery | human rights | emancipation | Caribbean | slavery | 2013-10-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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? The Caribbean after Slavery.

Description

Professor Gad Heuman, University of Warwick delivers the 2013 David Nicholls Memorial Trust Lecture. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human rights | emancipation | Caribbean | slavery | human rights | emancipation | Caribbean | slavery | 2013-10-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT) 9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals. Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | Behavioral modification | ethology | ethology | sociobiology | sociobiology | learning | learning | Social Status | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Persuasion | Politics | Politics | Individual | Individual | Sexuality | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | social organization | dominance structures | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | emancipation | Mating | Mating | reproduction | reproduction | Emotion | Emotion | Facial Expression | Facial Expression | Displays | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Comparative cognition | Signs | Signs | Symbols | Symbols | pharmacology | pharmacology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT) 9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals. Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | Behavioral modification | ethology | ethology | sociobiology | sociobiology | learning | learning | Social Status | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Persuasion | Politics | Politics | Individual | Individual | Sexuality | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | social organization | dominance structures | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | emancipation | Mating | Mating | reproduction | reproduction | Emotion | Emotion | Facial Expression | Facial Expression | Displays | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Comparative cognition | Signs | Signs | Symbols | Symbols | pharmacology | pharmacology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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A Negro Family coming into the Union Lines. A Negro Family coming into the Union Lines.

Description

Subjects

horses | horses | civilwar | civilwar | africanamericans | africanamericans | emancipation | emancipation | wagons | wagons

License

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT) 21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers. 21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | insurgents | war | war | freedom fighters | freedom fighters | independence | independence | self-determination | self-determination | emancipation | emancipation | revolution | revolution | Mao | Mao | Lenin | Lenin | Reagan | Reagan | L'Ouverture | L'Ouverture | reactionary | reactionary | imperialism | imperialism | human rights | human rights | democracy | democracy | populism | populism | Communism | Communism | equality | equality | nationalism | nationalism | resistance | resistance | ideology | ideology | subversion | subversion | underground | underground | suppression | suppression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Power and international order Power and international order

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. This module gives students the unique opportunity to study a selected range of fundamental texts, which have a crucial and seminal influence on the development of International Relations, and on the study of war and peace, culture and strategy. Using these texts, the aim is both to analyse the growth of the discipline of International Relations, and assess how these texts reflect and inform key themes and debates, such as: the creation of a world society, the different interpretations of power and national interest, the concepts of ethics and intervention, human security, racism and emancipation, motives underlying conflicts, genocide, and conditions necessary for peace. We This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010. This module gives students the unique opportunity to study a selected range of fundamental texts, which have a crucial and seminal influence on the development of International Relations, and on the study of war and peace, culture and strategy. Using these texts, the aim is both to analyse the growth of the discipline of International Relations, and assess how these texts reflect and inform key themes and debates, such as: the creation of a world society, the different interpretations of power and national interest, the concepts of ethics and intervention, human security, racism and emancipation, motives underlying conflicts, genocide, and conditions necessary for peace. We

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | development of International Relations | development of International Relations | creation of a world society | creation of a world society | power and national interest | power and national interest | ethics and intervention | ethics and intervention | human security | human security | Module Code:M12053 | Module Code:M12053 | racism and emancipation | racism and emancipation | realpolitik | realpolitik | International Relations scholars | International Relations scholars

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT) 17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries. This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries.

Subjects

democracy | democracy | economic development | economic development | politics | politics | Germany | Germany | Iraq | Iraq | Mexico | Mexico | United States | United States | Middle East | Middle East | Latin America | Latin America | Africa | Africa | South Asia | South Asia | East Asia | East Asia | Greece | Greece | Aristotle | Aristotle | foreign affairs | foreign affairs | Lee Kuan Yew | Lee Kuan Yew | democratic institution | democratic institution | social divisions | social divisions | Federalist Papers | Federalist Papers | Karl Marx | Karl Marx | Communist Party | Communist Party | leadership | leadership | polarization | polarization | gridlock | gridlock | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Weimar Republic | Weimar Republic | imposed sovereignty | imposed sovereignty | Austri | Austri | regime breakdown | regime breakdown | Brazil | Brazil | capitalism | capitalism | industrial policy | industrial policy | women's emancipation | women's emancipation | women's suffrage | women's suffrage | Athens | Athens | the Constitution | the Constitution | reform | reform | presidentialism | presidentialism | federalism | federalism | bicameralism | bicameralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sex in a Shifting Landscape Lecture Two:Oxford Uehiro Lectures 2012

Description

Second lecture in the 2012 Uehiro Lecture series 'Sex in A Shifting Landscape'. After a hundred and fifty years of feminism, we are still struggling to achieve a satisfactory legal and social framework for managing the relations of the sexes. This is partly, of course, because so many men have been unwilling to give up their traditional privileges, and the original feminist project is still far from finished. But more fundamentally than that, we have no clear conception of what a fair arrangement would be. You can regard some kinds of inequality as definitely unjust while being in considerable doubt about others. And even if we ever thought we had reached an ideal solution, the endlessly shifting landscape of technological change would soon throw things into turmoil. Reproductive technol Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | climate change | philosophy | inequality | sexism | emancipation | ethics | feminism | uehiro | climate change | philosophy | inequality | sexism | emancipation | ethics | feminism | 2012-11-21

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Sex in a Shifting Landscape Lecture One: Oxford Uehiro Lectures 2012

Description

Professor Janet Radcliffe-Richards gives (OUC Distinguished Research Fellow) gives the first of three lectures on feminism for the Uehiro Practical Ethics lecture series. After a hundred and fifty years of feminism, we are still struggling to achieve a satisfactory legal and social framework for managing the relations of the sexes. This is partly, of course, because so many men have been unwilling to give up their traditional privileges, and the original feminist project is still far from finished. But more fundamentally than that, we have no clear conception of what a fair arrangement would be. You can regard some kinds of inequality as definitely unjust while being in considerable doubt about others. And even if we ever thought we had reached an ideal solution, the endlessly shifting lan Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

uehiro | philosophy | john stuart mill | sexism | emancipation | ethics | feminism | uehiro | philosophy | john stuart mill | sexism | emancipation | ethics | feminism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | war | freedom fighters | independence | self-determination | emancipation | revolution | Mao | Lenin | Reagan | L'Ouverture | reactionary | imperialism | human rights | democracy | populism | Communism | equality | nationalism | resistance | ideology | subversion | underground | suppression

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | ethology | sociobiology | learning | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Politics | Individual | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | Mating | reproduction | Emotion | Facial Expression | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Signs | Symbols | pharmacology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.50 Introduction to Comparative Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines why democracy emerges and survives in some countries rather than in others; how political institutions affect economic development; and how American politics compares to that of other countries.

Subjects

democracy | economic development | politics | Germany | Iraq | Mexico | United States | Middle East | Latin America | Africa | South Asia | East Asia | Greece | Aristotle | foreign affairs | Lee Kuan Yew | democratic institution | social divisions | Federalist Papers | Karl Marx | Communist Party | leadership | polarization | gridlock | Arab Spring | Weimar Republic | imposed sovereignty | Austri | regime breakdown | Brazil | capitalism | industrial policy | women's emancipation | women's suffrage | Athens | the Constitution | reform | presidentialism | federalism | bicameralism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Uncle Sam's Funeral

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: Uncle Sam's Funeral Political Party: Democratic Election Year: 1864 Date Made: 1864 Measurement: Sheet Music: 14 x 10 3/4 in.; 35.56 x 27.305 cm Classification: Publications Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5zt5 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | sheetmusic | politics | musicalnotation | democraticparty | africanamericans | emancipationproclamation | constitutionoftheunitedstates | symbols | unclesam | deaths | coffins | culidentifier:value=2214sm0040 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

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Uncle Sam's Funeral

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: Uncle Sam's Funeral Political Party: Democratic Election Year: 1864 Date Made: 1864 Measurement: Sheet Music: 14 x 10 3/4 in.; 35.56 x 27.305 cm Classification: Publications Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/5zt4 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | sheetmusic | politics | musicalnotation | democraticparty | africanamericans | emancipationproclamation | constitutionoftheunitedstates | symbols | unclesam | deaths | coffins | culidentifier:value=2214sm0040 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

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Lincoln Commemorative Medallions, ca. 1865-1909

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: Lincoln Commemorative Medallions, ca. 1865-1909 Political Party: Republican Date Made: ca. 1865-1909 Measurement: Mount: 6 5/8 x 8 5/8 in.; 16.8275 x 21.9075 cm Classification: Metalwork Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/60rk There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | portraits | medallionsmedals | lincolnabraham | politics | commemoratives | busts | profileportraits | headsrepresentations | speeches | centennials | wreaths | oakbranches | emancipationproclamation | clouds | gettysburgaddress | deaths | mourning | memory | culidentifier:value=2214tk0031 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

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Lincoln Commemorative Medallions, ca. 1865-1909

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: Lincoln Commemorative Medallions, ca. 1865-1909 Political Party: Republican Date Made: ca. 1865-1909 Measurement: Mount: 6 5/8 x 8 5/8 in.; 16.8275 x 21.9075 cm Classification: Metalwork Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/60rm There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | portraits | medallionsmedals | lincolnabraham | politics | commemoratives | busts | profileportraits | headsrepresentations | speeches | centennials | wreaths | oakbranches | emancipationproclamation | clouds | gettysburgaddress | deaths | mourning | memory | culidentifier:value=2214tk0031 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

License

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9.52-B Topics in Brain and Cognitive Sciences Human Ethology (MIT)

Description

Survey and special topics designed for students in Brain and Cognitive Sciences. Emphasizes ethological studies of natural behavior patterns and their analysis in laboratory work, with contributions from field biology (mammology, primatology), sociobiology, and comparative psychology. Stresses human behavior but also includes major contributions from studies of other animals.

Subjects

Behavioral modification | ethology | sociobiology | learning | Social Status | Cross-Cultural Differences | Persuasion | Politics | Individual | Sexuality | Dimorphisms in body and behavior | social organization | dominance structures | evolution of sexual signals | emancipation | Mating | reproduction | Emotion | Facial Expression | Displays | General Non-Verbal Communication | Sex Modeling behaviors | Machine interfaces | Cognitive ethology | Comparative cognition | Signs | Symbols | pharmacology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lincoln-Andrew Johnson Campaign and Commemorative Items, ca. 1864-1865

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: Lincoln-Andrew Johnson Campaign and Commemorative Items, ca. 1864-1865 Political Party: Federalist Election Year: 1864 Date Made: ca. 1864-1909 Measurement: Mount: 8 x 12 in.; 20.32 x 30.48 cm Classification: Ephemera Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/60r3 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | portraits | medals | medallionsmedals | pendantsjewelry | buttonsfasteners | clippings | pinsjewelry | lincolnabraham | politics | promotionalmaterials | washingtongeorge | busts | profileportraits | quotationstexts | slavery | emancipationproclamation | americancivilwar | americanflags | gettysburgaddress | centennials | commemoratives | history | stars | freedom | symbols | animals | eagles | cannons | shields | wreaths | drums | cannonballs | unity | clubsassociations | religion | marketing | grantulyssess18221885 | leeroberte | generals | women | treason | oakbranches | johnsonandrew18081875 | birds | culidentifier:value=2214tk0024 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

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Lincoln-Andrew Johnson Campaign and Commemorative Items, ca. 1864-1865

Description

Collection: Cornell University Collection of Political Americana, Cornell University Library Repository: Susan H. Douglas Political Americana Collection, #2214 Rare & Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library, Cornell University Title: Lincoln-Andrew Johnson Campaign and Commemorative Items, ca. 1864-1865 Political Party: Federalist Election Year: 1864 Date Made: ca. 1864-1909 Measurement: Mount: 8 x 12 in.; 20.32 x 30.48 cm Classification: Ephemera Persistent URI: hdl.handle.net/1813.001/60r4 There are no known U.S. copyright restrictions on this image. The digital file is owned by the Cornell University Library which is making it freely available with the request that, when possible, the Library be credited as its source.

Subjects

cornelluniversitylibrary | portraits | medals | medallionsmedals | pendantsjewelry | buttonsfasteners | clippings | pinsjewelry | lincolnabraham | politics | promotionalmaterials | washingtongeorge | busts | profileportraits | quotationstexts | slavery | emancipationproclamation | americancivilwar | americanflags | gettysburgaddress | centennials | commemoratives | history | stars | freedom | symbols | animals | eagles | cannons | shields | wreaths | drums | cannonballs | unity | clubsassociations | religion | marketing | grantulyssess18221885 | leeroberte | generals | women | treason | oakbranches | johnsonandrew18081875 | birds | culidentifier:value=2214tk0024 | culidentifier:lunafield=idnumber

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | war | freedom fighters | independence | self-determination | emancipation | revolution | Mao | Lenin | Reagan | L'Ouverture | reactionary | imperialism | human rights | democracy | populism | Communism | equality | nationalism | resistance | ideology | subversion | underground | suppression

License

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