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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT) 10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

The assessment of current and potential future energy systems is covered in this course and includes topics on resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Detailed information on the course textbook can be found here: Tester, J. W., E. M. Drake, M. W. Golay, M. J. Driscoll, and W. A. Peters. Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005. ISBN: 0262201534. The assessment of current and potential future energy systems is covered in this course and includes topics on resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Detailed information on the course textbook can be found here: Tester, J. W., E. M. Drake, M. W. Golay, M. J. Driscoll, and W. A. Peters. Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005. ISBN: 0262201534.

Subjects

renewable energy | renewable energy | conservation | conservation | alternative power | alternative power | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | efficiency | efficiency | system analysis | system analysis | greenhouse | greenhouse | consumption | consumption | fuel | fuel | resource allocation | resource allocation | sustainable energy | sustainable energy | energy use | energy use | energy transfer | energy transfer | conversion | conversion | clean technologies | clean technologies | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | electrochemical energy | electrochemical energy | biomass energy | biomass energy | wind power | wind power | fusion energy | fusion energy | fossil energy | fossil energy | solar thermal energy | solar thermal energy | energy supply | energy supply | energy demand | energy demand | 10.391 | 10.391 | 1.818 | 1.818 | 2.65 | 2.65 | 3.564 | 3.564 | 11.371 | 11.371 | 22.811ESD.166J | 22.811ESD.166J | ESD.166 | ESD.166

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy. This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT) 8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo

Subjects

energy | energy | solar energy | solar energy | wind energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | biological energy sources | thermal energy | thermal energy | eothermal power | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | hydro power | climate change | climate change | energy storage | energy storage | energy conservation | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | OTEC | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor

License

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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT) 10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the

Subjects

Assessment of energy systems | Assessment of energy systems | resources | resources | extraction | extraction | conversion | conversion | and end-use | and end-use | regional and global energy needs | regional and global energy needs | 21st century | 21st century | sustainable manner | sustainable manner | renewable and conventional energy technologies | renewable and conventional energy technologies | biomass energy | biomass energy | fossil fuels | fossil fuels | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | nuclear power | nuclear power | wind power | wind power | solar energy | solar energy | hydrogen fuel | hydrogen fuel | fusion energy | fusion energy | analysis of energy technology systems | analysis of energy technology systems | political | political | social | social | economic | economic | environment | environment

License

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5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT) 5.92 Energy, Environment, and Society (MIT)

Description

"Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca "Energy, Environment and Society" is an opportunity for first-year students to make direct contributions to energy innovations at MIT and in local communities. The class takes a project-based approach, bringing student teams together to conduct studies that will help MIT, Cambridge and Boston to make tangible improvements in their energy management systems. Students will develop a thorough understanding of energy systems and their major components through guest lectures by researchers from across MIT and will apply that knowledge in their projects. Students are involved in all aspects of project design, from the refinement of research questions to data collection and analysis, conclusion drawing and presentation of findings. Each student team will work closely with experts including loca

Subjects

energy | energy | environment | environment | society | society | energy initiative | energy initiative | project-based | project-based | energy management | energy management | project design | project design | renewable energy | renewable energy | energy efficiency | energy efficiency | transportation | transportation | wind power | wind power | wind mill | wind mill | energy recovery | energy recovery | nuclear reactor | nuclear reactor | infrastructure | infrastructure | climate | climate | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | sustainable energy | sustainable energy | energy calculator | energy calculator | solar power | solar power | solarthermal | solarthermal | solar photovoltaic | solar photovoltaic | greenhouse gas | greenhouse gas | emissions | emissions | turbines | turbines

License

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IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures, AV faculty introductions, AV special element video. The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings

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11.942 Regional Energy-Environmental Economic Modeling (MIT) 11.942 Regional Energy-Environmental Economic Modeling (MIT)

Description

This subject is on regional energy-environmental modeling rather than on general energy-environmental policies, but the models should have some policy relevance. We will start with some discussion of green accounting issues; then, we will cover a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to spatial energy demand and supply, energy forecasts, national and regional energy prices, and environmental implications of regional energy consumption and production. Where feasible, the topics will have a spatial dimension. This is a new seminar, so we expect students to contribute material to the set of readings and topics covered during the semester. This subject is on regional energy-environmental modeling rather than on general energy-environmental policies, but the models should have some policy relevance. We will start with some discussion of green accounting issues; then, we will cover a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to spatial energy demand and supply, energy forecasts, national and regional energy prices, and environmental implications of regional energy consumption and production. Where feasible, the topics will have a spatial dimension. This is a new seminar, so we expect students to contribute material to the set of readings and topics covered during the semester.

Subjects

regional energy environmental modeling | regional energy environmental modeling | policies | policies | microeconomics | microeconomics | economic modeling | economic modeling | economic modeling techniques | economic modeling techniques | input-output | input-output | general equilibrium | general equilibrium | linear programming | linear programming | logit | logit | regression | regression | green accounting | green accounting | spatial energy demand | spatial energy demand | spatial energy supply | spatial energy supply | energy forecast | energy forecast | regional energy prices | regional energy prices | regional energy consumption | regional energy consumption | regional energy production | regional energy production

License

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IV (MIT) IV (MIT)

Description

The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files The basic objective of Unified Engineering is to give a solid understanding of the fundamental disciplines of aerospace engineering, as well as their interrelationships and applications. These disciplines are Materials and Structures (M); Computers and Programming (C); Fluid Mechanics (F); Thermodynamics (T); Propulsion (P); and Signals and Systems (S). In choosing to teach these subjects in a unified manner, the instructors seek to explain the common intellectual threads in these disciplines, as well as their combined application to solve engineering Systems Problems (SP). Throughout the year, the instructors emphasize the connections among the disciplines.Technical RequirementsMicrosoft® Excel software is recommended for viewing the .xls files

Subjects

Unified | Unified | Unified Engineering | Unified Engineering | aerospace | aerospace | CDIO | CDIO | C-D-I-O | C-D-I-O | conceive | conceive | design | design | implement | implement | operate | operate | team | team | team-based | team-based | discipline | discipline | materials | materials | structures | structures | materials and structures | materials and structures | computers | computers | programming | programming | computers and programming | computers and programming | fluids | fluids | fluid mechanics | fluid mechanics | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | propulsion | propulsion | signals | signals | systems | systems | signals and systems | signals and systems | systems problems | systems problems | fundamentals | fundamentals | technical communication | technical communication | graphical communication | graphical communication | communication | communication | reading | reading | research | research | experimentation | experimentation | personal response system | personal response system | prs | prs | active learning | active learning | First law | First law | first law of thermodynamics | first law of thermodynamics | thermo-mechanical | thermo-mechanical | energy | energy | energy conversion | energy conversion | aerospace power systems | aerospace power systems | propulsion systems | propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | aerospace propulsion systems | heat | heat | work | work | thermal efficiency | thermal efficiency | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy exchange | energy exchange | processes | processes | heat engines | heat engines | engines | engines | steady-flow energy equation | steady-flow energy equation | energy flow | energy flow | flows | flows | path-dependence | path-dependence | path-independence | path-independence | reversibility | reversibility | irreversibility | irreversibility | state | state | thermodynamic state | thermodynamic state | performance | performance | ideal cycle | ideal cycle | simple heat engine | simple heat engine | cycles | cycles | thermal pressures | thermal pressures | temperatures | temperatures | linear static networks | linear static networks | loop method | loop method | node method | node method | linear dynamic networks | linear dynamic networks | classical methods | classical methods | state methods | state methods | state concepts | state concepts | dynamic systems | dynamic systems | resistive circuits | resistive circuits | sources | sources | voltages | voltages | currents | currents | Thevinin | Thevinin | Norton | Norton | initial value problems | initial value problems | RLC networks | RLC networks | characteristic values | characteristic values | characteristic vectors | characteristic vectors | transfer function | transfer function | ada | ada | ada programming | ada programming | programming language | programming language | software systems | software systems | programming style | programming style | computer architecture | computer architecture | program language evolution | program language evolution | classification | classification | numerical computation | numerical computation | number representation systems | number representation systems | assembly | assembly | SimpleSIM | SimpleSIM | RISC | RISC | CISC | CISC | operating systems | operating systems | single user | single user | multitasking | multitasking | multiprocessing | multiprocessing | domain-specific classification | domain-specific classification | recursive | recursive | execution time | execution time | fluid dynamics | fluid dynamics | physical properties of a fluid | physical properties of a fluid | fluid flow | fluid flow | mach | mach | reynolds | reynolds | conservation | conservation | conservation principles | conservation principles | conservation of mass | conservation of mass | conservation of momentum | conservation of momentum | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | continuity | continuity | inviscid | inviscid | steady flow | steady flow | simple bodies | simple bodies | airfoils | airfoils | wings | wings | channels | channels | aerodynamics | aerodynamics | forces | forces | moments | moments | equilibrium | equilibrium | freebody diagram | freebody diagram | free-body | free-body | free body | free body | planar force systems | planar force systems | equipollent systems | equipollent systems | equipollence | equipollence | support reactions | support reactions | reactions | reactions | static determinance | static determinance | determinate systems | determinate systems | truss analysis | truss analysis | trusses | trusses | method of joints | method of joints | method of sections | method of sections | statically indeterminate | statically indeterminate | three great principles | three great principles | 3 great principles | 3 great principles | indicial notation | indicial notation | rotation of coordinates | rotation of coordinates | coordinate rotation | coordinate rotation | stress | stress | extensional stress | extensional stress | shear stress | shear stress | notation | notation | plane stress | plane stress | stress equilbrium | stress equilbrium | stress transformation | stress transformation | mohr | mohr | mohr's circle | mohr's circle | principal stress | principal stress | principal stresses | principal stresses | extreme shear stress | extreme shear stress | strain | strain | extensional strain | extensional strain | shear strain | shear strain | strain-displacement | strain-displacement | compatibility | compatibility | strain transformation | strain transformation | transformation of strain | transformation of strain | mohr's circle for strain | mohr's circle for strain | principal strain | principal strain | extreme shear strain | extreme shear strain | uniaxial stress-strain | uniaxial stress-strain | material properties | material properties | classes of materials | classes of materials | bulk material properties | bulk material properties | origin of elastic properties | origin of elastic properties | structures of materials | structures of materials | atomic bonding | atomic bonding | packing of atoms | packing of atoms | atomic packing | atomic packing | crystals | crystals | crystal structures | crystal structures | polymers | polymers | estimate of moduli | estimate of moduli | moduli | moduli | composites | composites | composite materials | composite materials | modulus limited design | modulus limited design | material selection | material selection | materials selection | materials selection | measurement of elastic properties | measurement of elastic properties | stress-strain | stress-strain | stress-strain relations | stress-strain relations | anisotropy | anisotropy | orthotropy | orthotropy | measurements | measurements | engineering notation | engineering notation | Hooke | Hooke | Hooke's law | Hooke's law | general hooke's law | general hooke's law | equations of elasticity | equations of elasticity | boundary conditions | boundary conditions | multi-disciplinary | multi-disciplinary | models | models | engineering systems | engineering systems | experiments | experiments | investigations | investigations | experimental error | experimental error | design evaluation | design evaluation | evaluation | evaluation | trade studies | trade studies | effects of engineering | effects of engineering | social context | social context | engineering drawings | engineering drawings | 16.01 | 16.01 | 16.02 | 16.02 | 16.03 | 16.03 | 16.04 | 16.04

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22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT) 22.081J Introduction to Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments. This class assesses current and potential future energy systems, covering resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use technologies, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Instructors and guest lecturers will examine various renewable and conventional energy production technologies, energy end-use practices and alternatives, and consumption practices in different countries. Students will learn a quantitative framework to aid in evaluation and analysis of energy technology system proposals in the context of engineering, political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Students taking the graduate version, Sustainable Energy, complete additional assignments.

Subjects

22.081 | 22.081 | 2.650 | 2.650 | 10.291 | 10.291 | 1.818 | 1.818 | 10.391 | 10.391 | 11.371 | 11.371 | 22.811 | 22.811 | ESD.166 | ESD.166 | energy transfer | energy transfer | clean technologies | clean technologies | energy resource assessment | energy resource assessment | energy conversion | energy conversion | wind power | wind power | nuclear proliferation | nuclear proliferation | nuclear waste disposal | nuclear waste disposal | carbon management options | carbon management options | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | solar photovoltaics | solar photovoltaics | solar thermal energy | solar thermal energy | biomass energy | biomass energy | biomass conversion | biomass conversion | eco-buildings | eco-buildings | hydropower | hydropower

License

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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

The assessment of current and potential future energy systems is covered in this course and includes topics on resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, with emphasis on meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. Detailed information on the course textbook can be found here: Tester, J. W., E. M. Drake, M. W. Golay, M. J. Driscoll, and W. A. Peters. Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005. ISBN: 0262201534.

Subjects

renewable energy | conservation | alternative power | thermodynamics | efficiency | system analysis | greenhouse | consumption | fuel | resource allocation | sustainable energy | energy use | energy transfer | conversion | clean technologies | nuclear energy | electrochemical energy | biomass energy | wind power | fusion energy | fossil energy | solar thermal energy | energy supply | energy demand | 10.391 | 1.818 | 2.65 | 3.564 | 11.371 | 22.811ESD.166J | ESD.166

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4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT)

Description

4.42J (or 2.66J or 1.044J), Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture, and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. It provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. Throughout the course, the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced.  Two design projects play a major part in this class. They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem, relating to energy consumption in buildings. The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ 4.42J (or 2.66J or 1.044J), Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings, is an undergraduate class offered in the Department of Architecture, and jointly in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. It provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. Throughout the course, the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings are introduced.  Two design projects play a major part in this class. They will require creative use of the principles and information given in the course to solve a particular problem, relating to energy consumption in buildings. The students will be asked to propose and assess innovativ

Subjects

energy in buildings | energy in buildings | thermo-sciences | thermo-sciences | energy | energy | ventilation | ventilation | air conditioning and comfort in buildings | air conditioning and comfort in buildings | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | electricity | electricity | architecture | architecture | building technology | building technology | civil engineering | civil engineering | buildings | buildings | conservation of energy | conservation of energy | air-water vapor mixtures | air-water vapor mixtures | thermal comfort | thermal comfort | heat pumps | heat pumps | refrigeration cycles | refrigeration cycles | thermodynamic performance | thermodynamic performance | heat transfer | heat transfer | creative design projects | creative design projects | air conditioning | air conditioning | energy consumption | energy consumption | building designs | building designs | building technologies | building technologies | operating schemes | operating schemes | properties of gases | properties of gases | properties of liquids | properties of liquids | power producing systems | power producing systems | energy losses | energy losses | building envelope | building envelope | 4.42 | 4.42 | 1.044 | 1.044 | 2.66 | 2.66

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11.165 Infrastructure and Energy Technology Challenges (MIT) 11.165 Infrastructure and Energy Technology Challenges (MIT)

Description

This seminar examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance, and regulate infrastructure and energy technologies from a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. It is conducted with intensive in-class discussions and debates. This seminar examines efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance, and regulate infrastructure and energy technologies from a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. It is conducted with intensive in-class discussions and debates.

Subjects

Energy infrastructure | Energy infrastructure | energy crisis | energy crisis | energy security | energy security | economics of public goods and infrastructure | economics of public goods and infrastructure | Infrastructure development | Infrastructure development | infrastructure policy | infrastructure policy | infrastructure financing | infrastructure financing | energy system | energy system | food security | food security | political economy of energy | political economy of energy | long term development of energy | long term development of energy | infrastructure delivery | infrastructure delivery

License

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14.44 Energy Economics (MIT) 14.44 Energy Economics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission. This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission.

Subjects

supply and demand | supply and demand | competitive market | competitive market | energy demand | energy demand | income elasticity | income elasticity | multivariate regression analysis | multivariate regression analysis | natural gas | natural gas | price regulation | price regulation | deregulation | deregulation | electricity | electricity | oil | oil | energy security | energy security | risk management | risk management | futures markets | futures markets | climate change | climate change | energy | energy | coal | coal | nuclear power | nuclear power | energy efficiency | energy efficiency | policy | policy | renewable energy | renewable energy | emissions | emissions

License

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ESD.126 Energy Systems and Economic Development (MIT) ESD.126 Energy Systems and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

A team-based policy research subject focused on evaluation of energy technologies and their implementation within developing countries. Focuses on one or more specific nations, carries out a resource assessment, and develops an energy strategy that is congruent with technical potential, cultural requirements, and environmental constraints. A team-based policy research subject focused on evaluation of energy technologies and their implementation within developing countries. Focuses on one or more specific nations, carries out a resource assessment, and develops an energy strategy that is congruent with technical potential, cultural requirements, and environmental constraints.

Subjects

energy systems | energy systems | economic development | economic development | energy technology | energy technology | energy strategy | energy strategy | energy policy | energy policy | energy industry | energy industry | privatization | privatization | deregulation | deregulation | utilities | utilities

License

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11.165 Infrastructure in Crisis: Energy and Security Challenges (MIT) 11.165 Infrastructure in Crisis: Energy and Security Challenges (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this seminar is to examine efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance and regulate infrastructure systems and services that affect energy security. We will introduce a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. During the seminar, students will explore how an energy crisis can be an opportunity for making fundamental changes to improve collapsing infrastructure networks. The sessions will be used to introduce the challenges to modern society concerning energy security, and for students to study how food security and energy security are intertwined, as well as how infrastructure supports the energy system. We will review the moral hazard aspects of infrastructure and the common arguments for withholding adequate support to the reb The purpose of this seminar is to examine efforts in developing and advanced nations and regions to create, finance and regulate infrastructure systems and services that affect energy security. We will introduce a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives. During the seminar, students will explore how an energy crisis can be an opportunity for making fundamental changes to improve collapsing infrastructure networks. The sessions will be used to introduce the challenges to modern society concerning energy security, and for students to study how food security and energy security are intertwined, as well as how infrastructure supports the energy system. We will review the moral hazard aspects of infrastructure and the common arguments for withholding adequate support to the reb

Subjects

Energy infrastructure | Energy infrastructure | energy crisis | energy crisis | energy security | energy security | economics of public goods and infrastructure | economics of public goods and infrastructure | Infrastructure development | Infrastructure development | infrastructure policy | infrastructure policy | infrastructure financing | infrastructure financing | energy system | energy system | food security | food security | political economy of energy | political economy of energy | long term development of energy | long term development of energy | infrastructure delivery | infrastructure delivery

License

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6.S079 Nanomaker (MIT) 6.S079 Nanomaker (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course links clean energy sources and storage technology to energy consumption case studies to give students a concept of the full circle of production and consumption. Specifically, photovoltaic, organic photovoltaic, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity sources are applied to electrophoresis, lab on a chip, and paper microfluidic applications–relevant analytical techniques in biology and chemistry. Hands-on experimentation with everyday materials and equipment help connect the theory with the implementation. Complementary laboratories fabricating LEDs, organic LEDs and spectrometers introduce the diagnostic tools used to characterize energy efficiency.This course is one of many OCW Energy Courses, and it is an elective Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course links clean energy sources and storage technology to energy consumption case studies to give students a concept of the full circle of production and consumption. Specifically, photovoltaic, organic photovoltaic, piezoelectricity and thermoelectricity sources are applied to electrophoresis, lab on a chip, and paper microfluidic applications–relevant analytical techniques in biology and chemistry. Hands-on experimentation with everyday materials and equipment help connect the theory with the implementation. Complementary laboratories fabricating LEDs, organic LEDs and spectrometers introduce the diagnostic tools used to characterize energy efficiency.This course is one of many OCW Energy Courses, and it is an elective

Subjects

clean energy | clean energy | energy sources | energy sources | energy storage | energy storage | energy consumption | energy consumption | photovoltaic | photovoltaic | piezoelectric | piezoelectric | thermoelectric | thermoelectric | LED | LED | light emitting diode | light emitting diode | organic LED | organic LED | analytical biology | analytical biology | analytical chemistry | analytical chemistry | microfluidics | microfluidics | spectrometer | spectrometer | energy efficiency | energy efficiency

License

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Energy resources: An introduction to energy resources

Description

Energy resources are essential for any society, be it one dependent on subsistence farming or an industrialised country. There are many different sources of energy, some well-known such as coal or petroleum, others less so, such as tides or the heat inside the Earth. Is nuclear power a salvation or a nightmare? This unit provides background information to each resource, so that you can assess them for yourself.

Subjects

anoxic biomass carbohydrates energy density energy efficiency energy force fossil fuels fuels geesoer hydropower kinetic energy methane nuclear energy photosynthesis potential energy power primary energy renewable energy supplies residence time respiration solar energy ukoer work | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like: How much energy can we really get from wind? How does a solar photovoltaic work? What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work? What is the physics behind global warming? What makes engines efficient? How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards? The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.

Subjects

energy | solar energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | thermal energy | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | climate change | energy storage | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | nuclear reactor

License

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8.21 The Physics of Energy (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to give you the scientific understanding you need to answer questions like:How much energy can we really get from wind?How does a solar photovoltaic work?What is an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Converter) and how does it work?What is the physics behind global warming?What makes engines efficient?How does a nuclear reactor work, and what are the realistic hazards?The course is designed for MIT sophomores, juniors, and seniors who want to understand the fundamental laws and physical processes that govern the sources, extraction, transmission, storage, degradation, and end uses of energy.Special note about this course: The Physics of Energy is a new subject at MIT, offered for the first time in the Fall of 2008. The materials for the course, as such, are not yet ready fo

Subjects

energy | solar energy | wind energy | nuclear energy | biological energy sources | thermal energy | eothermal power | ocean thermal energy conversion | hydro power | climate change | energy storage | energy conservation | nuclear radiation | solar photovoltaic | OTEC | nuclear reactor

License

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4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT)

Description

This subject provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. It introduces the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings. It includes a detailed treatment of different forms of energy, energy conservation, properties of gases and liquids, air-water vapor mixtures and performance limits for air conditioning and power producing systems. Heat transfer principles are introduced with applications to energy losses from a building envelope. The subject is a prerequisite for more advanced thermo-science subjects in Architecture and Mechanical Engineering. This subject provides a first course in thermo-sciences for students primarily interested in architecture and building technology. It introduces the fundamentals important to energy, ventilation, air conditioning and comfort in buildings. It includes a detailed treatment of different forms of energy, energy conservation, properties of gases and liquids, air-water vapor mixtures and performance limits for air conditioning and power producing systems. Heat transfer principles are introduced with applications to energy losses from a building envelope. The subject is a prerequisite for more advanced thermo-science subjects in Architecture and Mechanical Engineering.

Subjects

energy in buildings | energy in buildings | ventilation | ventilation | air conditioning | air conditioning | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy conservation | energy conservation | heat transfer | heat transfer | energy losses from buildings | energy losses from buildings

License

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4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT) 4.42J Fundamentals of Energy in Buildings (MIT)

Description

This design-based subject provides a first course in energy and thermo-sciences with applications to sustainable energy-efficient architecture and building technology. No previous experience with subject matter is assumed. After taking this subject, students will understand introductory thermodynamics and heat transfer, know the leading order factors in building energy use, and have creatively employed their understanding of energy fundamentals and knowledge of building energy use in innovative building design projects. This year, the focus will be on design projects that will complement the new NSTAR/MIT campus efficiency program. This design-based subject provides a first course in energy and thermo-sciences with applications to sustainable energy-efficient architecture and building technology. No previous experience with subject matter is assumed. After taking this subject, students will understand introductory thermodynamics and heat transfer, know the leading order factors in building energy use, and have creatively employed their understanding of energy fundamentals and knowledge of building energy use in innovative building design projects. This year, the focus will be on design projects that will complement the new NSTAR/MIT campus efficiency program.

Subjects

energy in buildings | energy in buildings | ventilation | ventilation | air conditioning | air conditioning | forms of energy | forms of energy | energy conservation | energy conservation | heat transfer | heat transfer | energy losses from buildings | energy losses from buildings

License

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10.626 Electrochemical Energy Systems (MIT) 10.626 Electrochemical Energy Systems (MIT)

Description

This course introduces principles and mathematical models of electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Students study equivalent circuits, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena, electrostatics, porous media, and phase transformations. In addition, this course includes applications to batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, and electrokinetics. This course introduces principles and mathematical models of electrochemical energy conversion and storage. Students study equivalent circuits, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, transport phenomena, electrostatics, porous media, and phase transformations. In addition, this course includes applications to batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, and electrokinetics.

Subjects

energy | energy | electrochemical energy conversion | electrochemical energy conversion | electrochemical energy storage | electrochemical energy storage | transport phenomena | transport phenomena | diffuse charge | diffuse charge | Faradaic reactions | Faradaic reactions | statistical thermodynamics | statistical thermodynamics | phase transformations | phase transformations | rechargeable batteries | rechargeable batteries | fuel cells | fuel cells | supercapacitors | supercapacitors | solar cells | solar cells | desalination | desalination | electrokinetic energy conversion | electrokinetic energy conversion

License

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6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT) 6.061 Introduction to Electric Power Systems (MIT)

Description

This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Electric power systems are also at the heart of alternative energy systems, including wind and solar electric, geothermal and small scale hydroelectric generation. This course is an introductory subject in the field of electric power systems and electrical to mechanical energy conversion. Electric power has become increasingly important as a way of transmitting and transforming energy in industrial, military and transportation uses. Electric power systems are also at the heart of alternative energy systems, including wind and solar electric, geothermal and small scale hydroelectric generation.

Subjects

electric power systems | electric power systems | energy conversion | energy conversion | electrical energy | electrical energy | mechanical energy | mechanical energy | electric transportation | electric transportation | alternative energy | alternative energy | electric circuits | electric circuits | magnetic field devices | magnetic field devices | lumped parameter electromechanics | lumped parameter electromechanics

License

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2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes (MIT) 2.57 Nano-to-Macro Transport Processes (MIT)

Description

This course provides parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology. This course provides parallel treatments of photons, electrons, phonons, and molecules as energy carriers, aiming at fundamental understanding and descriptive tools for energy and heat transport processes from nanoscale continuously to macroscale. Topics include the energy levels, the statistical behavior and internal energy, energy transport in the forms of waves and particles, scattering and heat generation processes, Boltzmann equation and derivation of classical laws, deviation from classical laws at nanoscale and their appropriate descriptions, with applications in nano- and microtechnology.

Subjects

nanotechnology | nanotechnology | nanoscale | nanoscale | transport phenomena | transport phenomena | photons | photons | electrons | electrons | phonons | phonons | energy carriers | energy carriers | energy transport | energy transport | heat transport | heat transport | energy levels | energy levels | statistical behavior | statistical behavior | internal energy | internal energy | waves and particles | waves and particles | scattering | scattering | heat generation | heat generation | Boltzmann equation | Boltzmann equation | classical laws | classical laws | microtechnology | microtechnology | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | quantum oscillator | quantum oscillator | laudaurer | laudaurer | nanotube | nanotube | Louiville equation | Louiville equation | X-ray | X-ray | blackbody | blackbody | quantum well | quantum well | Fourier | Fourier | Newton | Newton | Ohm | Ohm | thermoelectric effect | thermoelectric effect | Brownian motion | Brownian motion | surface tension | surface tension | van der Waals potential. | van der Waals potential. | van der Waals potential | van der Waals potential

License

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1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability (MIT) 1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability (MIT)

Description

This course covers the use of ecological and thermodynamic principles to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment. Topics include conservation and constitutive laws, box models, feedback, thermodynamic concepts, energy in natural and engineered systems, basic transport concepts, life cycle analysis and related economic methods.Topics such as renewable energy, sustainable agriculture, green buildings, and mitigation of climate change are illustrated with quantitative case studies. Case studies are team-oriented and may include numerical simulations and design exercises. Some programming experience is desirable but not a prerequisite. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication are provided. This course covers the use of ecological and thermodynamic principles to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment. Topics include conservation and constitutive laws, box models, feedback, thermodynamic concepts, energy in natural and engineered systems, basic transport concepts, life cycle analysis and related economic methods.Topics such as renewable energy, sustainable agriculture, green buildings, and mitigation of climate change are illustrated with quantitative case studies. Case studies are team-oriented and may include numerical simulations and design exercises. Some programming experience is desirable but not a prerequisite. Instruction and practice in oral and written communication are provided.

Subjects

systems | systems | conservation laws | conservation laws | constitutive laws | constitutive laws | box models | box models | mass conservation | mass conservation | perturbation methods | perturbation methods | thermodymanics | thermodymanics | heat transfer | heat transfer | enthalpy | enthalpy | entropy | entropy | multiphase systems | multiphase systems | mass and energy balances | mass and energy balances | energy supply options | energy supply options | economic value | economic value | natural resources | natural resources | multiobjective analysis | multiobjective analysis | life cycle analysis | life cycle analysis | mass and energy transport | mass and energy transport | green buildings | green buildings | transportation modeling | transportation modeling | renewable energy | renewable energy | climate modeling | climate modeling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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