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10.492-2 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Introduction to Biocatalysis (MIT) 10.492-2 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Introduction to Biocatalysis (MIT)

Description

This course provides a brief introduction to the field of biocatalysis in the context of process design. Fundamental topics include why and when one may choose to use biological systems for chemical conversion, considerations for using free enzymes versus whole cells, and issues related to design and development of bioconversion processes. Biological and engineering problems are discussed as well as how one may arrive at both biological and engineering solutions. This course provides a brief introduction to the field of biocatalysis in the context of process design. Fundamental topics include why and when one may choose to use biological systems for chemical conversion, considerations for using free enzymes versus whole cells, and issues related to design and development of bioconversion processes. Biological and engineering problems are discussed as well as how one may arrive at both biological and engineering solutions.

Subjects

biocatalysis | biocatalysis | enzymes | enzymes | enzyme kinetics | enzyme kinetics | whole cell catalysts | whole cell catalysts | biocatalytic processes | biocatalytic processes | site-directed mutagenesis | site-directed mutagenesis | cloning | cloning | enzyme performance | enzyme performance | enzyme specificity | enzyme specificity | enzyme inhibition | enzyme inhibition | enzyme toxicity | enzyme toxicity | yield | yield | enzyme instability | enzyme instability | equilibrium reactions | equilibrium reactions | product solubility | product solubility | substrate solubility | substrate solubility

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10.492-2 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Introduction to Biocatalysis (MIT)

Description

This course provides a brief introduction to the field of biocatalysis in the context of process design. Fundamental topics include why and when one may choose to use biological systems for chemical conversion, considerations for using free enzymes versus whole cells, and issues related to design and development of bioconversion processes. Biological and engineering problems are discussed as well as how one may arrive at both biological and engineering solutions.

Subjects

biocatalysis | enzymes | enzyme kinetics | whole cell catalysts | biocatalytic processes | site-directed mutagenesis | cloning | enzyme performance | enzyme specificity | enzyme inhibition | enzyme toxicity | yield | enzyme instability | equilibrium reactions | product solubility | substrate solubility

License

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10.492-2 Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Introduction to Biocatalysis (MIT)

Description

This course provides a brief introduction to the field of biocatalysis in the context of process design. Fundamental topics include why and when one may choose to use biological systems for chemical conversion, considerations for using free enzymes versus whole cells, and issues related to design and development of bioconversion processes. Biological and engineering problems are discussed as well as how one may arrive at both biological and engineering solutions.

Subjects

biocatalysis | enzymes | enzyme kinetics | whole cell catalysts | biocatalytic processes | site-directed mutagenesis | cloning | enzyme performance | enzyme specificity | enzyme inhibition | enzyme toxicity | yield | enzyme instability | equilibrium reactions | product solubility | substrate solubility

License

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7.347 Fueling Sustainability: Engineering Microbial Systems for Biofuel Production (MIT) 7.347 Fueling Sustainability: Engineering Microbial Systems for Biofuel Production (MIT)

Description

The need to identify sustainable forms of energy as an alternative to our dependence on depleting worldwide oil reserves is one of the grand challenges of our time. The energy from the sun converted into plant biomass is the most promising renewable resource available to humanity. This seminar will examine each of the critical steps along the pathway towards the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in The need to identify sustainable forms of energy as an alternative to our dependence on depleting worldwide oil reserves is one of the grand challenges of our time. The energy from the sun converted into plant biomass is the most promising renewable resource available to humanity. This seminar will examine each of the critical steps along the pathway towards the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in

Subjects

Engineering | Engineering | Microbial Systems | Microbial Systems | Biofuel Production | Biofuel Production | energy | energy | plant biomass | plant biomass | cellulose | cellulose | enzymes | enzymes | bacteria | bacteria | ethanol | ethanol | cellulolytic enzymes | cellulolytic enzymes | Cellulolytic Bacteria and Fungi | Cellulolytic Bacteria and Fungi | cellulases | cellulases | cellulosomes | cellulosomes | E. coli | E. coli | yeast | yeast

License

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7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT) 7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT)

Description

Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current

Subjects

evolution | evolution | biocatalyst | biocatalyst | mutation | mutation | library | library | recombination | recombination | directed evolution | directed evolution | enzyme | enzyme | point mutation | point mutation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | DNA | DNA | gene | gene | complementation | complementation | affinity | affinity | phage | phage | ribosome display | ribosome display | yeast surface display | yeast surface display | bacterial cell surface display | bacterial cell surface display | IVC | IVC | FACS | FACS | active site | active site

License

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7.340 Under the Radar Screen: How Bugs Trick Our Immune Defenses (MIT) 7.340 Under the Radar Screen: How Bugs Trick Our Immune Defenses (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will explore the specific ways by which microbes defeat our immune system and the molecular mechanisms that are under attack (phagocytosis, the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway, MHC I/II antigen presentation). Through our discussion and dissection of the primary research literature, we will explore aspects of host-pathogen interactions. We will particularly emphasize the experimental techniques used in the field and how to read and understand research data. Technological advances in the fight against microbes will also be discussed, with specific examples. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about In this course, we will explore the specific ways by which microbes defeat our immune system and the molecular mechanisms that are under attack (phagocytosis, the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway, MHC I/II antigen presentation). Through our discussion and dissection of the primary research literature, we will explore aspects of host-pathogen interactions. We will particularly emphasize the experimental techniques used in the field and how to read and understand research data. Technological advances in the fight against microbes will also be discussed, with specific examples. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about

Subjects

HIV | HIV | mycobacterium tuberculosis | mycobacterium tuberculosis | malaria | malaria | influenza | influenza | immune system | immune system | pathogens | pathogens | viruses | viruses | bacteria | bacteria | parasites | parasites | microbes | microbes | phagocytosis | phagocytosis | ubiquitin/proteasome pathway | ubiquitin/proteasome pathway | MHC I/II antigen presentation | MHC I/II antigen presentation | Salmonella | Salmonella | pathogen-associated molecular patterns | pathogen-associated molecular patterns | PAMP | PAMP | Toll-like receptors | Toll-like receptors | TLR | TLR | Vaccinia virus | Vaccinia virus | Proteasome | Proteasome | Ubiquitin; deubiquinating enzymes | Ubiquitin; deubiquinating enzymes | DUB | DUB | Herpes simplex virus | Herpes simplex virus | HSV | HSV | Yersinia | Yersinia | viral budding | viral budding | Human cytomegalovirus | Human cytomegalovirus | HCMV | HCMV | Histocompatiblity | Histocompatiblity | AIDS | AIDS | Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpes virus | Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpes virus | Mixoma virus | Mixoma virus | Epstein Barr virus | Epstein Barr virus | EBV | EBV | Burkitt?s B cell lymphoma | Burkitt?s B cell lymphoma

License

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SP.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT) SP.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes. This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes.

Subjects

cooking | cooking | food | food | chemistry | chemistry | experiment | experiment | extraction | extraction | denaturation | denaturation | phase change | phase change | capsicum | capsicum | biochemistry | biochemistry | chocolate | chocolate | cheese | cheese | yeast | yeast | recipe | recipe | jam | jam | pectin | pectin | enzyme | enzyme | dairy | dairy | molecular gastronomy | molecular gastronomy | salt | salt | colloid | colloid | stability | stability | liquid nitrogen | liquid nitrogen | ice cream | ice cream | biology | biology | microbiology | microbiology

License

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Chemistry, epigenetics and drugs

Description

Alteration of gene expression is fundamental to many diseases. A better understanding of how epigenetic proteins affect diseases provides a starting point for therapy development and the discovery of new drug. Professor Paul Brennan research focusses on epigenetics: the mechanisms that control gene expression. He studies how chemical probes interfere with epigenetic enyzmes that can be targeted to treat various diseases. Epigenetics combined with disease biology will ultimately accelerate drug discovery. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

gene expression | Epigenetics | proteins | drug discovery | enzymes | gene expression | Epigenetics | proteins | drug discovery | enzymes

License

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The genetics of metabolic diseases

Description

A missing step in a metabolic pathway leads to the build-up of toxic compounds, and the lack of materials essential for normal function. Professor Wyatt Yue explores how genetic defects lead to disease at the molecular level, by determining 3D structures and biochemical properties of enzymes and protein complexes linked to congenital genetic errors. Professor Yue works closely with clinicians and paediatricians to decipher the underlying genetic, biochemical and cellular mechanisms of these diseases. His long-term aim is to help design novel therapeutic approaches for metabolic diseases. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

matabolic | genetics | enzymes | biochemical | cellular | mechanisms | matabolic | genetics | enzymes | biochemical | cellular | mechanisms

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Chemistry, epigenetics and drugs

Description

Alteration of gene expression is fundamental to many diseases. A better understanding of how epigenetic proteins affect diseases provides a starting point for therapy development and the discovery of new drug. Professor Paul Brennan research focusses on epigenetics: the mechanisms that control gene expression. He studies how chemical probes interfere with epigenetic enyzmes that can be targeted to treat various diseases. Epigenetics combined with disease biology will ultimately accelerate drug discovery. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

gene expression | Epigenetics | proteins | drug discovery | enzymes | gene expression | Epigenetics | proteins | drug discovery | enzymes

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The genetics of metabolic diseases

Description

A missing step in a metabolic pathway leads to the build-up of toxic compounds, and the lack of materials essential for normal function. Professor Wyatt Yue explores how genetic defects lead to disease at the molecular level, by determining 3D structures and biochemical properties of enzymes and protein complexes linked to congenital genetic errors. Professor Yue works closely with clinicians and paediatricians to decipher the underlying genetic, biochemical and cellular mechanisms of these diseases. His long-term aim is to help design novel therapeutic approaches for metabolic diseases. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

matabolic | genetics | enzymes | biochemical | cellular | mechanisms | matabolic | genetics | enzymes | biochemical | cellular | mechanisms

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT) 7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT)

Description

Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology. Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology.

Subjects

microbiology | microbiology | genetics | genetics | rhodococcus | rhodococcus | bacteria | bacteria | genes | genes | plasmid manipulation | plasmid manipulation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | PCR | PCR | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | enzyme assays | enzyme assays | gene expression | gene expression | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | Gram-positive | Gram-positive | gram-negative | gram-negative | bioconversion processes | bioconversion processes | synthesis | synthesis | precursors | precursors | metabolites | metabolites | genetic complementation | genetic complementation | laboratory | laboratory | lab | lab

License

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5.36 Biochemistry Laboratory (MIT) 5.36 Biochemistry Laboratory (MIT)

Description

The course, which spans two thirds of a semester, provides students with a research-inspired laboratory experience that introduces standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a current and exciting research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Techniques include protein expression, purification, and gel analysis, PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, kinase activity assays, and protein structure viewing. This class is part of the new laboratory curriculum in the MIT Department of Chemistry. Undergraduate Research-Inspired Experimental Chemistry Alternatives (URIECA) introduces students to cutting edge research topics in a modular format. Acknowledgments Development of this course was funded through an HHMI Professors grant to Professor Catherine L. Drennan. The course, which spans two thirds of a semester, provides students with a research-inspired laboratory experience that introduces standard biochemical techniques in the context of investigating a current and exciting research topic, acquired resistance to the cancer drug Gleevec. Techniques include protein expression, purification, and gel analysis, PCR, site-directed mutagenesis, kinase activity assays, and protein structure viewing. This class is part of the new laboratory curriculum in the MIT Department of Chemistry. Undergraduate Research-Inspired Experimental Chemistry Alternatives (URIECA) introduces students to cutting edge research topics in a modular format. Acknowledgments Development of this course was funded through an HHMI Professors grant to Professor Catherine L. Drennan.

Subjects

URIECA | URIECA | laboratory | laboratory | kinase | kinase | cancer cells | cancer cells | laboratory techniques | laboratory techniques | DNA | DNA | cultures | cultures | UV-Vis | UV-Vis | agarose gel | agarose gel | Abl-gleevec | Abl-gleevec | affinity tags | affinity tags | lyse | lyse | digest | digest | mutants | mutants | resistance | resistance | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | recombinant | recombinant | nickel affinity | nickel affinity | inhibitors | inhibitors | biochemistry | biochemistry | kinetics | kinetics | enzyme | enzyme | inhibition | inhibition | purification | purification | expression | expression

License

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5.32 Intermediate Chemical Experimentation (MIT) 5.32 Intermediate Chemical Experimentation (MIT)

Description

5.32 involves more advanced experimental work than 5.310 or 5.311. The course emphasizes organic synthesis assisted by chiral catalysis, purification, and analysis of organic compounds employing such methods as IR, 1D and 2D NMR, UV spectroscopies and mass spectrometry, and thin layer and non-chiral and chiral gas chromatography. In 5.32, experiments also involve enzyme purification, characterization and assays, as well as molecular modeling in organic synthesis and in biochemical systems. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials are potentially hazardous and require a high level of safety training, special facilities and equipment, and supervision by appropriate individuals. You bear the sole responsibility, liability, and risk for the implementation of such 5.32 involves more advanced experimental work than 5.310 or 5.311. The course emphasizes organic synthesis assisted by chiral catalysis, purification, and analysis of organic compounds employing such methods as IR, 1D and 2D NMR, UV spectroscopies and mass spectrometry, and thin layer and non-chiral and chiral gas chromatography. In 5.32, experiments also involve enzyme purification, characterization and assays, as well as molecular modeling in organic synthesis and in biochemical systems. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials are potentially hazardous and require a high level of safety training, special facilities and equipment, and supervision by appropriate individuals. You bear the sole responsibility, liability, and risk for the implementation of such

Subjects

intermediate chemical experimentation | intermediate chemical experimentation | experiment | experiment | chemistry | chemistry | organic synthesis | organic synthesis | chiral catalysis | chiral catalysis | purification | purification | organic chemistry | organic chemistry | laboratory | laboratory | IR | IR | 1D NMR | 1D NMR | 2D NMR | 2D NMR | UV spectroscopy | UV spectroscopy | mass spectrometry | mass spectrometry | thin layer gas chromatography | thin layer gas chromatography | non-chiral gas chromatography | non-chiral gas chromatography | chiral gas chromatography | chiral gas chromatography | enzyme purification | enzyme purification | characterization | characterization | assays | assays | molecular modeling | molecular modeling | biochemical systems | biochemical systems

License

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7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT) 7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT)

Description

Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology. Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology.

Subjects

microbiology | microbiology | genetics | genetics | rhodococcus | rhodococcus | bacteria | bacteria | genes | genes | plasmid manipulation | plasmid manipulation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | PCR | PCR | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | enzyme assays | enzyme assays | gene expression | gene expression | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | Gram-positive | Gram-positive | gram-negative | gram-negative | bioconversion processes | bioconversion processes | synthesis | synthesis | precursors | precursors | metabolites | metabolites | genetic complementation | genetic complementation | laboratory | laboratory | lab | lab

License

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Communication (MIT) Communication (MIT)

Description

This introductory biology laboratory course covers the application of experimental techniques in microbiology, biochemistry, cell and developmental biology. Emphasis is placed on the integration of factual knowledge with understanding of the design of the experiments and data analysis in order to prepare the students for future research projects. Development of skills critical for writing about scientific findings in modern biology is also covered in the Scientific Communications portion of the curriculum, 7.02CI. Additional Faculty Dr. Katherine Bacon Schneider Dr. Jean-Francois Hamel Ms. Deborah Kruzel Dr. Megan Rokop This introductory biology laboratory course covers the application of experimental techniques in microbiology, biochemistry, cell and developmental biology. Emphasis is placed on the integration of factual knowledge with understanding of the design of the experiments and data analysis in order to prepare the students for future research projects. Development of skills critical for writing about scientific findings in modern biology is also covered in the Scientific Communications portion of the curriculum, 7.02CI. Additional Faculty Dr. Katherine Bacon Schneider Dr. Jean-Francois Hamel Ms. Deborah Kruzel Dr. Megan Rokop

Subjects

experimental biology | experimental biology | microbial genetics | microbial genetics | protein biochemistry | protein biochemistry | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | development | development | zebrafish | zebrafish | phase contrast microscopy | phase contrast microscopy | teratogenesis | teratogenesis | rna isolation | rna isolation | northern blot | northern blot | gene expression | gene expression | western blot | western blot | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | RNA gel | RNA gel | RNA fixation | RNA fixation | probe labeling | probe labeling | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | transposon | transposon | column chromatography | column chromatography | size-exclusion chromatography | size-exclusion chromatography | anion exchange chromatography | anion exchange chromatography | SDS-Page gel | SDS-Page gel | enzyme kinetics | enzyme kinetics | transformation | transformation | primers | primers

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7.347 Fueling Sustainability: Engineering Microbial Systems for Biofuel Production (MIT)

Description

The need to identify sustainable forms of energy as an alternative to our dependence on depleting worldwide oil reserves is one of the grand challenges of our time. The energy from the sun converted into plant biomass is the most promising renewable resource available to humanity. This seminar will examine each of the critical steps along the pathway towards the conversion of plant biomass into ethanol. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in

Subjects

Engineering | Microbial Systems | Biofuel Production | energy | plant biomass | cellulose | enzymes | bacteria | ethanol | cellulolytic enzymes | Cellulolytic Bacteria and Fungi | cellulases | cellulosomes | E. coli | yeast

License

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ES.SP.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT) ES.SP.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT)

Description

This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes. This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes.

Subjects

cooking | cooking | food | food | chemistry | chemistry | experiment | experiment | extraction | extraction | denaturation | denaturation | phase change | phase change | capsicum | capsicum | biochemistry | biochemistry | chocolate | chocolate | cheese | cheese | yeast | yeast | recipe | recipe | jam | jam | pectin | pectin | enzyme | enzyme | dairy | dairy | molecular gastronomy | molecular gastronomy | salt | salt | colloid | colloid | stability | stability | liquid nitrogen | liquid nitrogen | ice cream | ice cream | biology | biology | microbiology | microbiology

License

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20.420J Biomolecular Kinetics and Cellular Dynamics (BE.420J) (MIT) 20.420J Biomolecular Kinetics and Cellular Dynamics (BE.420J) (MIT)

Description

This subject deals primarily with kinetic and equilibrium mathematical models of biomolecular interactions, as well as the application of these quantitative analyses to biological problems across a wide range of levels of organization, from individual molecular interactions to populations of cells. This subject deals primarily with kinetic and equilibrium mathematical models of biomolecular interactions, as well as the application of these quantitative analyses to biological problems across a wide range of levels of organization, from individual molecular interactions to populations of cells.

Subjects

receptor | receptor | ligand | ligand | signaling | signaling | enzyme | enzyme | binding | binding | hybridization | hybridization | cell | cell | dynamics | dynamics | metabolism | metabolism | regulation | regulation | kinetics | kinetics | 20.420 | 20.420 | 10.410J | 10.410J | 10.538 | 10.538 | BE.420J | BE.420J | BE.420 | BE.420

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BE.420J Biomolecular Kinetics and Cellular Dynamics (MIT) BE.420J Biomolecular Kinetics and Cellular Dynamics (MIT)

Description

This subject deals primarily with kinetic and equilibrium mathematical models of biomolecular interactions, as well as the application of these quantitative analyses to biological problems across a wide range of levels of organization, from individual molecular interactions to populations of cells. This subject deals primarily with kinetic and equilibrium mathematical models of biomolecular interactions, as well as the application of these quantitative analyses to biological problems across a wide range of levels of organization, from individual molecular interactions to populations of cells.

Subjects

receptor | receptor | ligand | ligand | signaling | signaling | enzyme | enzyme | binding | binding | hybridization | hybridization | cell | cell | dynamics | dynamics | metabolism | metabolism | regulation | regulation | kinetics | kinetics | BE.420 | BE.420 | 10.538J | 10.538J | 10.538 | 10.538

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10.442 Biochemical Engineering (MIT) 10.442 Biochemical Engineering (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the interaction of chemical engineering, biochemistry, and microbiology. Mathematical representations of microbial systems are featured among lecture topics. Kinetics of growth, death, and metabolism are also covered. Continuous fermentation, agitation, mass transfer, and scale-up in fermentation systems, and enzyme technology round out the subject material. This course focuses on the interaction of chemical engineering, biochemistry, and microbiology. Mathematical representations of microbial systems are featured among lecture topics. Kinetics of growth, death, and metabolism are also covered. Continuous fermentation, agitation, mass transfer, and scale-up in fermentation systems, and enzyme technology round out the subject material.

Subjects

chemical engineering | chemical engineering | biochemistry | biochemistry | microbiology | microbiology | mathematical representations of microbial systems | mathematical representations of microbial systems | kinetics of growth | kinetics of growth | kinetics of death | kinetics of death | kinetics of metabolism | kinetics of metabolism | continuous fermentation | continuous fermentation | agitation | agitation | mass transfer | mass transfer | scale-up in fermentation systems | scale-up in fermentation systems | enzyme technology | enzyme technology

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17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT) 17.462 Innovation in Military Organizations (MIT)

Description

This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations. This seminar has three purposes. One, it inquires into the causes of military innovation by examining a number of the most outstanding historical cases. Two, it views military innovations through the lens of organization theory to develop generalizations about the innovation process within militaries. Three, it uses the empirical study of military innovations as a way to examine the strength and credibility of hypotheses that organization theorists have generated about innovation in non-military organizations.

Subjects

URIECA | URIECA | laboratory | laboratory | kinase | kinase | cancer cells | cancer cells | laboratory techniques | laboratory techniques | DNA | DNA | cultures | cultures | UV-Vis | UV-Vis | agarose gel | agarose gel | Abl-gleevec | Abl-gleevec | affinity tags | affinity tags | lyse | lyse | digest | digest | mutants | mutants | resistance | resistance | gel electrophoresis | gel electrophoresis | recombinant | recombinant | nickel affinity | nickel affinity | inhibitors | inhibitors | biochemistry | biochemistry | kinetics | kinetics | enzyme | enzyme | inhibition | inhibition | purification | purification | expression | expression | Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | innovation | innovation | military organizations | military organizations | war | war | history | history | organization theory | organization theory | empirical study | empirical study | land warfare | land warfare | battleships | battleships | airpower | airpower | submarines | submarines | cruise | cruise | ballistic | ballistic | missiles | missiles | armor | armor | military affairs | military affairs | strategic | strategic | tactical | tactical | counterinsurgency | counterinsurgency | Vietnam | Vietnam | Revolution in Military Affairs | Revolution in Military Affairs | RMA | RMA

License

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20.320 Analysis of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems (MIT) 20.320 Analysis of Biomolecular and Cellular Systems (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on computational and experimental analysis of biological systems across a hierarchy of scales, including genetic, molecular, cellular, and cell population levels. The two central themes of the course are modeling of complex dynamic systems and protein design and engineering. Topics include gene sequence analysis, molecular modeling, metabolic and gene regulation networks, signal transduction pathways and cell populations in tissues. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling. This course focuses on computational and experimental analysis of biological systems across a hierarchy of scales, including genetic, molecular, cellular, and cell population levels. The two central themes of the course are modeling of complex dynamic systems and protein design and engineering. Topics include gene sequence analysis, molecular modeling, metabolic and gene regulation networks, signal transduction pathways and cell populations in tissues. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods, quantitative analysis, and computational modeling.

Subjects

biological engineering | biological engineering | kinase | kinase | PyMOL | PyMOL | PyRosetta | PyRosetta | MATLAB | MATLAB | Michaelis-Menten | Michaelis-Menten | bioreactor | bioreactor | bromodomain | bromodomain | protein-ligand interactions | protein-ligand interactions | titration analysis | titration analysis | fractional separation | fractional separation | isothermal titration calorimetry | isothermal titration calorimetry | ITC | ITC | mass spectrometry | mass spectrometry | MS | MS | co-immunoprecipitation | co-immunoprecipitation | Co-IP | Co-IP | Forster resonance energy transfer | Forster resonance energy transfer | FRET | FRET | primary ligation assay | primary ligation assay | PLA | PLA | surface plasmon resonance | surface plasmon resonance | SPR | SPR | enzyme kinetics | enzyme kinetics | kinase engineering | kinase engineering | competitive inhibition | competitive inhibition | epidermal growth factor receptor | epidermal growth factor receptor | mitogen-activated protein kinase | mitogen-activated protein kinase | MAPK | MAPK | genome editing | genome editing | Imatinib | Imatinib | Gleevec | Gleevec | Glivec | Glivec | drug delivery | drug delivery | kinetics of molecular processes | kinetics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | dynamics of molecular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | kinetics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | dynamics of cellular processes | intracellular scale | intracellular scale | extracellular scale | extracellular scale | and cell population scale | and cell population scale | biotechnology applications | biotechnology applications | gene regulation networks | gene regulation networks | nucleic acid hybridization | nucleic acid hybridization | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in tissues | cell populations in bioreactors | cell populations in bioreactors | experimental methods | experimental methods | quantitative analysis | quantitative analysis | computational modeling | computational modeling

License

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7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT) 7.341 DNA Damage Checkpoints: The Emergency Brake on the Road to Cancer (MIT)

Description

The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an The DNA contained in human cells is under constant attack by both exogenous and endogenous agents that can damage one of its three billion base pairs. To cope with this permanent exposure to DNA-damaging agents, such as the sun's radiation or by-products of our normal metabolism, powerful DNA damage checkpoints have evolved that allow organisms to survive this constant assault on their genomes. In this class we will analyze classical and recent papers from the primary research literature to gain a profound understanding of checkpoints that act as powerful emergency brakes to prevent cancer. We will consider basic principles of cell proliferation and molecular details of the DNA damage response. We will discuss the methods and model organisms typically used in this field as well as how an

Subjects

DNA | DNA | damage checkpoints | damage checkpoints | cancer | cancer | cells | cells | human cells | human cells | exogenous | exogenous | endogenous | endogenous | checkpoints | checkpoints | gene | gene | signaling | signaling | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer prevention | cancer prevention | primary sources | primary sources | discussion | discussion | DNA damage | DNA damage | molecular | molecular | enzyme | enzyme | cell cycle | cell cycle | extracellular cues | extracellular cues | growth factors | growth factors | Cdk regulation | Cdk regulation | cyclin-dependent kinase | cyclin-dependent kinase | p53 | p53 | tumor suppressor | tumor suppressor | apoptosis | apoptosis | MDC1 | MDC1 | H2AX | H2AX | Rad50 | Rad50 | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Fluorescence activated cell sorter | Chk1 | Chk1 | mutant | mutant

License

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ES.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT) ES.287 Kitchen Chemistry (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes. Includes audio/video content: AV faculty introductions. This seminar is designed to be an experimental and hands-on approach to applied chemistry (as seen in cooking). Cooking may be the oldest and most widespread application of chemistry and recipes may be the oldest practical result of chemical research. We shall do some cooking experiments to illustrate some chemical principles, including extraction, denaturation, and phase changes.

Subjects

cooking | cooking | food | food | chemistry | chemistry | experiment | experiment | extraction | extraction | denaturation | denaturation | phase change | phase change | capsicum | capsicum | biochemistry | biochemistry | chocolate | chocolate | cheese | cheese | yeast | yeast | recipe | recipe | jam | jam | pectin | pectin | enzyme | enzyme | dairy | dairy | molecular gastronomy | molecular gastronomy | salt | salt | colloid | colloid | stability | stability | liquid nitrogen | liquid nitrogen | ice cream | ice cream | biology | biology | microbiology | microbiology

License

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