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7.344 The Fountain of Life: From Dolly to Customized Embryonic Stem Cells (MIT) 7.344 The Fountain of Life: From Dolly to Customized Embryonic Stem Cells (MIT)

Description

During development, the genetic content of each cell remains, with a few exceptions, identical to that of the zygote. Most differentiated cells therefore retain all of the genetic information necessary to generate an entire organism. It was through pioneering technology of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) that this concept was experimentally proven. Only 10 years ago the sheep Dolly was the first mammal to be cloned from an adult organism, demonstrating that the differentiated state of a mammalian cell can be fully reversible to a pluripotent embryonic state. A key conclusion from these experiments was that the difference between pluripotent cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and unipotent differentiated cells is solely a consequence of reversible changes. These changes, which hav During development, the genetic content of each cell remains, with a few exceptions, identical to that of the zygote. Most differentiated cells therefore retain all of the genetic information necessary to generate an entire organism. It was through pioneering technology of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) that this concept was experimentally proven. Only 10 years ago the sheep Dolly was the first mammal to be cloned from an adult organism, demonstrating that the differentiated state of a mammalian cell can be fully reversible to a pluripotent embryonic state. A key conclusion from these experiments was that the difference between pluripotent cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and unipotent differentiated cells is solely a consequence of reversible changes. These changes, which hav

Subjects

embryonic stem cells | embryonic stem cells | stem cells | stem cells | cells | cells | genetics | genetics | genome | genome | Dolly | Dolly | clone | clone | regenerative therapy | regenerative therapy | somatic | somatic | SCNT | SCNT | pluripotent | pluripotent | scientific literature | scientific literature | nuclear | nuclear | embryonic | embryonic | adult | adult | epigenetics | epigenetics | methylation | methylation | DNA | DNA | histone | histone | biomedical | biomedical | differentiation | differentiation | epigenome | epigenome | nuclear transfer | nuclear transfer | customized | customized | zygote | zygote | RNA | RNA | cancer | cancer | medicine | medicine

License

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7.346 DNA Wars: How the Cell Strikes Back to Avoid Disease after Attacks on DNA (MIT) 7.346 DNA Wars: How the Cell Strikes Back to Avoid Disease after Attacks on DNA (MIT)

Description

A never-ending molecular war takes place in the nucleus of your cells, with DNA damage occurring at a rate of over 20,000 lesions per cell per day. Where does this damage come from, and what are its consequences? What are the differences in the molecular blueprint between individuals who can sustain attacks on DNA and remain healthy compared to those who become sick? This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching. A never-ending molecular war takes place in the nucleus of your cells, with DNA damage occurring at a rate of over 20,000 lesions per cell per day. Where does this damage come from, and what are its consequences? What are the differences in the molecular blueprint between individuals who can sustain attacks on DNA and remain healthy compared to those who become sick? This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

DNA damage | DNA damage | DNA repair | DNA repair | mismatch repair | mismatch repair | direct reversal | direct reversal | nucleotide excision repair | nucleotide excision repair | base excision repair | base excision repair | double strand break repair | double strand break repair | nuclear DNA damage | nuclear DNA damage | mitochondrial DNA damage | mitochondrial DNA damage | Alkylating agents | Alkylating agents | replication errors | replication errors | mutations | mutations | epigenetics | epigenetics | Werner helicase activity | Werner helicase activity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.161 Molecular Biology and Genetics in Modern Medicine (MIT) HST.161 Molecular Biology and Genetics in Modern Medicine (MIT)

Description

This course provides a foundation for understanding the relationship between molecular biology, developmental biology, genetics, genomics, bioinformatics, and medicine. It develops explicit connections between basic research, medical understanding, and the perspective of patients. Principles of human genetics are reviewed. We translate clinical understanding into analysis at the level of the gene, chromosome and molecule; we cover the concepts and techniques of molecular biology and genomics, and the strategies and methods of genetic analysis, including an introduction to bioinformatics. Material in the course extends beyond basic principles to current research activity in human genetics. This course provides a foundation for understanding the relationship between molecular biology, developmental biology, genetics, genomics, bioinformatics, and medicine. It develops explicit connections between basic research, medical understanding, and the perspective of patients. Principles of human genetics are reviewed. We translate clinical understanding into analysis at the level of the gene, chromosome and molecule; we cover the concepts and techniques of molecular biology and genomics, and the strategies and methods of genetic analysis, including an introduction to bioinformatics. Material in the course extends beyond basic principles to current research activity in human genetics.

Subjects

Genetics | Genetics | genes | genes | genetic disorders | genetic disorders | inborn error | inborn error | muscular dystrophy | muscular dystrophy | PKU | PKU | phenylketoneuria | phenylketoneuria | cancer | cancer | tumors | tumors | gene therapy | gene therapy | disease | disease | birth defects | birth defects | chromosomes | chromosomes | leukemia | leukemia | RNAi | RNAi | hemophilia | hemophilia | thalassemia | thalassemia | deafness | deafness | mutations | mutations | hypertrophic cardiomyopathy | hypertrophic cardiomyopathy | epigenetics | epigenetics | rett syndrome | rett syndrome | prenatal diagnosis | prenatal diagnosis | LOD scores | LOD scores | gene linkage | gene linkage | mitochondrial disorders | mitochondrial disorders | degenerative disorders | degenerative disorders | complex traits | complex traits | Mendelian inheritance | Mendelian inheritance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Cancer Informatics

Description

Cancer research now generates huge amounts of data, and sophisticated computational tools are needed to answer biological questions. Making sense of this variability at molecular level will help us better tailor treatments to individual cancer patients. Dr Benjamin Schuster-Böckler heads the computational group at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. His work has demonstrated that epigenetic modifications influence the mutational landscape in cancer cells. He studies the effects of DNA-binding proteins on transcription factors, with the aim to understand the regulation (and mis-regulation) of the transcription of important oncogenes and tumour suppressors. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

cancer | data | computational | epigenetic | dna binding proteins | cancer | data | computational | epigenetic | dna binding proteins

License

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Cancer Informatics

Description

Cancer research now generates huge amounts of data, and sophisticated computational tools are needed to answer biological questions. Making sense of this variability at molecular level will help us better tailor treatments to individual cancer patients. Dr Benjamin Schuster-Böckler heads the computational group at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. His work has demonstrated that epigenetic modifications influence the mutational landscape in cancer cells. He studies the effects of DNA-binding proteins on transcription factors, with the aim to understand the regulation (and mis-regulation) of the transcription of important oncogenes and tumour suppressors. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

cancer | data | computational | epigenetic | dna binding proteins | cancer | data | computational | epigenetic | dna binding proteins

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.347 Epigenetic Regulation of Stem Cells (MIT) 7.347 Epigenetic Regulation of Stem Cells (MIT)

Description

During development a single totipotent cell gives rise to the vast array of cell types present in the adult human body, yet each cell has essentially the same DNA sequence. As cells differentiate, distinct sets of genes must be coordinately activated and repressed, ultimately leading to a cell-type specific pattern of gene expression and a particular cell fate. In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged in a complex protein super structure known as chromatin. Modification and reorganization of chromatin play a critical role in coordinating the cell-type specific gene expression programs that are required as a cell transitions from a pluripotent stem cell to a fully differentiated cell type. Epigenetics refers to such heritable changes that occur in chromatin without altering the primary DNA During development a single totipotent cell gives rise to the vast array of cell types present in the adult human body, yet each cell has essentially the same DNA sequence. As cells differentiate, distinct sets of genes must be coordinately activated and repressed, ultimately leading to a cell-type specific pattern of gene expression and a particular cell fate. In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged in a complex protein super structure known as chromatin. Modification and reorganization of chromatin play a critical role in coordinating the cell-type specific gene expression programs that are required as a cell transitions from a pluripotent stem cell to a fully differentiated cell type. Epigenetics refers to such heritable changes that occur in chromatin without altering the primary DNA

Subjects

Stem cells | Stem cells | induced pluripotency | induced pluripotency | Epigenetics | Epigenetics | chromatin | chromatin | histone | histone | epigenome | epigenome | genome-wide analyses | genome-wide analyses | high-throughput sequencing technologies | high-throughput sequencing technologies | Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing | Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing | ncRNAs | ncRNAs | epigenetic regulation | epigenetic regulation | DNA methylation | DNA methylation | post-translational modification of histones | post-translational modification of histones | roles of chromatin-assembly modifying complexes | roles of chromatin-assembly modifying complexes | non-coding RNAs | non-coding RNAs | nuclear organization | nuclear organization | developmental fate | developmental fate | stem cell therapy | stem cell therapy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.349 Stem Cells: A Cure or Disease? (MIT) 7.349 Stem Cells: A Cure or Disease? (MIT)

Description

Have you ever considered going to a pharmacy to order some new cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) for your ailing heart? It might sound crazy, but recent developments in stem cell science have made this concept not so futuristic. In this course, we will explore the underlying biology behind the idea of using stem cells to treat disease, specifically analyzing the mechanisms that enable a single genome to encode multiple cell states ranging from neurons to fibroblasts to T cells. Overall, we hope to provide a comprehensive overview of this exciting new field of research and its clinical relevance. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literat Have you ever considered going to a pharmacy to order some new cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) for your ailing heart? It might sound crazy, but recent developments in stem cell science have made this concept not so futuristic. In this course, we will explore the underlying biology behind the idea of using stem cells to treat disease, specifically analyzing the mechanisms that enable a single genome to encode multiple cell states ranging from neurons to fibroblasts to T cells. Overall, we hope to provide a comprehensive overview of this exciting new field of research and its clinical relevance. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literat

Subjects

stem cells | stem cells | stem cell therapy | stem cell therapy | cellular reprogramming | cellular reprogramming | transdifferentiation | transdifferentiation | pluripotency | pluripotency | epigenetics | epigenetics | genome-wide sequencing | genome-wide sequencing | transcription-mediated reprogramming | transcription-mediated reprogramming | embryonic stem cell technology | embryonic stem cell technology | transcription factors | transcription factors | chromatin structure | chromatin structure | H3K4me3 | H3K4me3 | H3K27me3 | H3K27me3 | histone deacetylase 1 | histone deacetylase 1 | RNAi screens | RNAi screens | Oct4 | Oct4 | cloning | cloning | Dolly | Dolly | in vitro differentiation | in vitro differentiation | regenerative medicine | regenerative medicine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.347 Epigenetic Regulation of Stem Cells (MIT)

Description

During development a single totipotent cell gives rise to the vast array of cell types present in the adult human body, yet each cell has essentially the same DNA sequence. As cells differentiate, distinct sets of genes must be coordinately activated and repressed, ultimately leading to a cell-type specific pattern of gene expression and a particular cell fate. In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged in a complex protein super structure known as chromatin. Modification and reorganization of chromatin play a critical role in coordinating the cell-type specific gene expression programs that are required as a cell transitions from a pluripotent stem cell to a fully differentiated cell type. Epigenetics refers to such heritable changes that occur in chromatin without altering the primary DNA

Subjects

Stem cells | induced pluripotency | Epigenetics | chromatin | histone | epigenome | genome-wide analyses | high-throughput sequencing technologies | Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing | ncRNAs | epigenetic regulation | DNA methylation | post-translational modification of histones | roles of chromatin-assembly modifying complexes | non-coding RNAs | nuclear organization | developmental fate | stem cell therapy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.346 DNA Wars: How the Cell Strikes Back to Avoid Disease after Attacks on DNA (MIT)

Description

A never-ending molecular war takes place in the nucleus of your cells, with DNA damage occurring at a rate of over 20,000 lesions per cell per day. Where does this damage come from, and what are its consequences? What are the differences in the molecular blueprint between individuals who can sustain attacks on DNA and remain healthy compared to those who become sick? This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching.

Subjects

DNA damage | DNA repair | mismatch repair | direct reversal | nucleotide excision repair | base excision repair | double strand break repair | nuclear DNA damage | mitochondrial DNA damage | Alkylating agents | replication errors | mutations | epigenetics | Werner helicase activity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.349 Stem Cells: A Cure or Disease? (MIT)

Description

Have you ever considered going to a pharmacy to order some new cardiomyocytes (heart muscle cells) for your ailing heart? It might sound crazy, but recent developments in stem cell science have made this concept not so futuristic. In this course, we will explore the underlying biology behind the idea of using stem cells to treat disease, specifically analyzing the mechanisms that enable a single genome to encode multiple cell states ranging from neurons to fibroblasts to T cells. Overall, we hope to provide a comprehensive overview of this exciting new field of research and its clinical relevance. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literat

Subjects

stem cells | stem cell therapy | cellular reprogramming | transdifferentiation | pluripotency | epigenetics | genome-wide sequencing | transcription-mediated reprogramming | embryonic stem cell technology | transcription factors | chromatin structure | H3K4me3 | H3K27me3 | histone deacetylase 1 | RNAi screens | Oct4 | cloning | Dolly | in vitro differentiation | regenerative medicine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.344 The Fountain of Life: From Dolly to Customized Embryonic Stem Cells (MIT)

Description

During development, the genetic content of each cell remains, with a few exceptions, identical to that of the zygote. Most differentiated cells therefore retain all of the genetic information necessary to generate an entire organism. It was through pioneering technology of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) that this concept was experimentally proven. Only 10 years ago the sheep Dolly was the first mammal to be cloned from an adult organism, demonstrating that the differentiated state of a mammalian cell can be fully reversible to a pluripotent embryonic state. A key conclusion from these experiments was that the difference between pluripotent cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and unipotent differentiated cells is solely a consequence of reversible changes. These changes, which hav

Subjects

embryonic stem cells | stem cells | cells | genetics | genome | Dolly | clone | regenerative therapy | somatic | SCNT | pluripotent | scientific literature | nuclear | embryonic | adult | epigenetics | methylation | DNA | histone | biomedical | differentiation | epigenome | nuclear transfer | customized | zygote | RNA | cancer | medicine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.161 Molecular Biology and Genetics in Modern Medicine (MIT)

Description

This course provides a foundation for understanding the relationship between molecular biology, developmental biology, genetics, genomics, bioinformatics, and medicine. It develops explicit connections between basic research, medical understanding, and the perspective of patients. Principles of human genetics are reviewed. We translate clinical understanding into analysis at the level of the gene, chromosome and molecule; we cover the concepts and techniques of molecular biology and genomics, and the strategies and methods of genetic analysis, including an introduction to bioinformatics. Material in the course extends beyond basic principles to current research activity in human genetics.

Subjects

Genetics | genes | genetic disorders | inborn error | muscular dystrophy | PKU | phenylketoneuria | cancer | tumors | gene therapy | disease | birth defects | chromosomes | leukemia | RNAi | hemophilia | thalassemia | deafness | mutations | hypertrophic cardiomyopathy | epigenetics | rett syndrome | prenatal diagnosis | LOD scores | gene linkage | mitochondrial disorders | degenerative disorders | complex traits | Mendelian inheritance

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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