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Study skills : essay writing (standalone version)

Description

This resource is designed to help students write better essays. It provides definitions of three essay types, which are ruled by three different learning styles (the rule-bound organiser, the aspirant arguer, and the accomplished auteur), and then descibes how essay questions should be addressed. Different techniques for structuring essays are explained, together with how to write the essay itself (including notes on re-drafting and proofing).

Subjects

essays | study skills | essay writing | essay structure | learning styles | Education | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | Learning | Employability | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | UK EL10 = SCQF 10 | Honours degree | Graduate diploma | X000 | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Study skills : essay writing (VLE version)

Description

This resource is designed to help students write better essays. It provides definitions of three essay types, which are ruled by three different learning styles (the rule-bound organiser, the aspirant arguer, and the accomplished auteur), and then descibes how essay questions should be addressed. Different techniques for structuring essays are explained, together with how to write the essay itself (including notes on re-drafting and proofing).

Subjects

essays | essay structure | essay writing | study skills | learning styles | Education | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | Employability | Learning | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | UK EL10 = SCQF 10 | Honours degree | Graduate diploma | X000 | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Essay Writing in History and Interdisciplinary Studies

Description

This exemplar examines planning, researching and writing essays and research/practical reports on different aspects of environmental history, some of which will involve the use of data from non-historical disciplines. It reviews and enhances the range of key skills required to engage in truly inter-disciplinary study while preparing, planning, and writing for these different forms of assessment. The exemplar includes the preliminary examination of the assessment requirements and content of these different forms of assessment (essay and research/practical report), consideration of how key arguments might be helpfully represented diagrammatically (spider diagrams) in developing ideas for assessment, and apparatus and references to the different kinds of sources (both historical and scientifi

Subjects

history | environmental history | environmental science | essay writing | writing essays | essay | researching | research | practical report | Historical and Philosophical studies | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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RES.21W-01 Angles (MIT) RES.21W-01 Angles (MIT)

Description

Angles is an annual online magazine of exemplary writing by MIT students. All of the works published in Angles since its first edition in 2008 were written by students in the introductory writing courses. These courses, designated as CI-HW (Communications-Intensive Humanities Writing) subjects, bring together students who love to write, students who struggle with writing, students who thrive in seminar-style classes, and students who just want a chance to develop their English skills. These students prosper together and produce some remarkable work. Angles has provided them with a public outlet for that work. It also provides the CI-HW instructors with material that inspires and guides their current students. In these classes, students learn to read more critically, to address specific aud Angles is an annual online magazine of exemplary writing by MIT students. All of the works published in Angles since its first edition in 2008 were written by students in the introductory writing courses. These courses, designated as CI-HW (Communications-Intensive Humanities Writing) subjects, bring together students who love to write, students who struggle with writing, students who thrive in seminar-style classes, and students who just want a chance to develop their English skills. These students prosper together and produce some remarkable work. Angles has provided them with a public outlet for that work. It also provides the CI-HW instructors with material that inspires and guides their current students. In these classes, students learn to read more critically, to address specific aud

Subjects

writing | writing | essay | essay | exemplary | exemplary | freshmen | freshmen | online magazine | online magazine | magazine | magazine | creative writing | creative writing | literary | literary | student work | student work | example | example | communications | communications | humanities | humanities | English | English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.021 Writing and Experience: MIT: Inside, Live (MIT) 21W.021 Writing and Experience: MIT: Inside, Live (MIT)

Description

During this seminar, students will chronicle their MIT experiences and investigate MIT history and culture. Visits to the MIT archives and museum, along with relevant readings, will supplement students’ experiences as source material for discussion and writing. During this seminar, students will chronicle their MIT experiences and investigate MIT history and culture. Visits to the MIT archives and museum, along with relevant readings, will supplement students’ experiences as source material for discussion and writing.

Subjects

MIT | MIT | history | history | culture | culture | writing | writing | campus | campus | graphic essay | graphic essay | journal | journal | Angles | Angles | Ilona Karmel Writing Prize | Ilona Karmel Writing Prize | library | library | freewriting | freewriting | museum | museum | workshop | workshop | archives | archives | student | student

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.292 Writing Workshop (MIT) SP.292 Writing Workshop (MIT)

Description

MIT students are challenged daily to solve for x, to complete four problem sets, two papers, and prepare for an exam worth 30% of their grade... all in one night. When they do stop to breathe, it's for a shower or a meal. What does this have to do with creative writing? Everything. Creative writing and MIT go together better than you might imagine. MIT students are challenged daily to solve for x, to complete four problem sets, two papers, and prepare for an exam worth 30% of their grade... all in one night. When they do stop to breathe, it's for a shower or a meal. What does this have to do with creative writing? Everything. Creative writing and MIT go together better than you might imagine.

Subjects

creative writing | creative writing | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | reading | reading | reflection | reflection | revision | revision | microfiction | microfiction | essay | essay | satire | satire | contributors' note | contributors' note | OuLiPo | OuLiPo

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Writing Skills

Description

This OER is intended to assist with advice and guidance to students on Writing Skills, including essay planning and writing, referencing, critical writing and critical reading. The OER also covers writing for science, writing reports, planning and conducting a dissertaion research project.

Subjects

ukoer writing skills study skills key skills essay planning essay writing referencing critical reading critical writing writing for science writing reports | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Essay writing

Description

This OER is intended to assist with advice and guidance to students on Essay Writing. This interactive resource focuses on improving the structure of your essays by giving you the opportunity to select options most relevant to your experience. It then provides you with a series of priority actions which should assist you in adopting sound essay writing and structuring techniques.

Subjects

ukoer | essays | essay writing | leicester university | otter | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts. Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts.

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | reading | reading | writing | writing | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary texts | literary texts | Dickinson | Dickinson | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Hughes | Hughes | Chekhov | Chekhov | Joyce | Joyce | Walker | Walker | Melville | Melville | Morrison | Morrison | analytical skills | analytical skills | essays | essays | analysis | analysis | communication | communication | poetry | poetry | fiction | fiction | drama | drama | Lahiri | Lahiri | Frayn | Frayn | textuality | textuality | conceptualization | conceptualization | film | film | media | media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Doživljajski spis Personal experience essay

Description

Vaje so povzete iz različnih knjig. Exercises and suggestions on how to write personal experience essays.

Subjects

jeziki | languages | moderni jeziki | modern languages | slovenski jezik | Slovene language | doživljajski spis | personal experience essay | spis | essay | slovenščina | slovene

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/

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Essay Writing

Description

This OER is intended to assist with advice and guidance to students on Essay Writing. This interactive resource focuses on improving the structure of your essays by giving you the opportunity to select options most relevant to your experience. It then provides you with a series of priority actions which should assist you in adopting sound essay writing and structuring techniques.

Subjects

ukoer writing skills study skills key skills essay planning essay writing critical writing | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.015 Writing and Rhetoric: Writing about Sports (MIT) 21W.015 Writing and Rhetoric: Writing about Sports (MIT)

Description

"Sports, not religion, is the opiate of the people." So says David Remnick, editor of the New Yorker and a former sportswriter. Many of our heroes are sports heroes, and for many of us, sports were an important part of our childhood years. Sports are big business, even on college campuses, and they are the subject of many classic movies. In this introductory writing class we consider the role of sports in our own lives and explore the cultural meanings of sports in America. Sports have produced a large body of excellent descriptive and analytic writing; we'll read writers as diverse as Hank Aaron, John Updike, David Foster Wallace, and Malcolm Gladwell on the joys and conundrums of baseball, boxing, football, tennis, and running. The primary work of the class is improving studen "Sports, not religion, is the opiate of the people." So says David Remnick, editor of the New Yorker and a former sportswriter. Many of our heroes are sports heroes, and for many of us, sports were an important part of our childhood years. Sports are big business, even on college campuses, and they are the subject of many classic movies. In this introductory writing class we consider the role of sports in our own lives and explore the cultural meanings of sports in America. Sports have produced a large body of excellent descriptive and analytic writing; we'll read writers as diverse as Hank Aaron, John Updike, David Foster Wallace, and Malcolm Gladwell on the joys and conundrums of baseball, boxing, football, tennis, and running. The primary work of the class is improving studen

Subjects

sport | sport | writing | writing | revision | revision | baseball | baseball | tennis | tennis | voice | voice | audience | audience | essay | essay | gender | gender | race | race | mudville | mudville | NCAA | NCAA | basketball | basketball | drugs | drugs | steroid | steroid | roids | roids | rhetoric | rhetoric | ESPN | ESPN | football | football | opiate | opiate | people | people | friday | friday | oral | oral | boxing | boxing | athlete | athlete

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT) 4.351 Introduction to Video (MIT)

Description

This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling. This class serves as an introduction to video recording and editing, presenting video as a tool of personal apprehension and expression, with an emphasis on self-exploration, performance, social critique, and the organization of raw experience into aesthetic form (narrative, abstract, documentary, essay). Students are required to complete a variety of assignments to learn the basics of video capture and editing, culminating in a final assignment that has to do with personal storytelling.

Subjects

movies | movies | filmmaking | filmmaking | digital video | digital video | storytelling | storytelling | modern art | modern art | media | media | computerized editing | computerized editing | personal story | personal story | emotional art | emotional art | Fluxus | Fluxus | Bill Viola | Bill Viola | digital representation | digital representation | video recording | video recording | editing | editing | self-exploration | self-exploration | performance | performance | social critique | social critique | aesthetic form | aesthetic form | narrative | narrative | abstract | abstract | documentary | documentary | essay | essay | video capture | video capture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Studying at University: A guide for first year students (4th edition)

Description

Authors:  Catherine Hutchings (4th edition revision). Illustrations by Stacy Stent The 4th edition of 'Studying at University: A guide for first year students' is intended to provide new students with the knowledge and skills required for coping with their studies and academic assig Clicked 265 times. Last clicked 07/31/2014 - 19:38. Teaching & Learning Context:  This guide is intended to help new students adjust to university life, with a particular focus on studies in the Humanities. However, much of the information is relevant to all students new to studying at university.

Subjects

Academic Development Programme | Centre for Higher Education Development | Downloadable Documents | Teaching and Learning Strategies | English | Post-secondary | essay topic action words | essay writing | first year | guide | handbook | learning | learning strategies | reading skills | strategy | stress management | study | study methods

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/za/

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21W.775 Writing about Nature and Environmental Issues (MIT) 21W.775 Writing about Nature and Environmental Issues (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on traditional nature writing and the environmentalist essay. Students will keep a web log as a journal. Writings are drawn from the tradition of nature writing and from contemporary forms of the environmentalist essay. This course focuses on traditional nature writing and the environmentalist essay. Students will keep a web log as a journal. Writings are drawn from the tradition of nature writing and from contemporary forms of the environmentalist essay.

Subjects

American nature writing | American nature writing | environmental journalism | environmental journalism | environmentalist essay | environmentalist essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT) 21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course is a workshop for students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or others', in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate. This course is a workshop for students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or others', in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate.

Subjects

Workshop | Workshop | advanced students | advanced students | writing | writing | essays | essays | nonfiction | nonfiction | prose | prose | identities | identities | gender | gender | race | race | class | class | nationality | nationality | sexuality | sexuality | identity | identity | expository | expository | exploratory | exploratory | investigative | investigative | persuasive | persuasive | lyrical | lyrical | incantatory | incantatory | determinants of identity | determinants of identity | intersect | intersect | compete | compete | cooperate | cooperate

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.022.03 Writing and Experience: Reading and Writing Autobiography (MIT) 21W.022.03 Writing and Experience: Reading and Writing Autobiography (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing in this course will focus on the art of self-narrative or autobiographical writing. Such writing can be crafted in the form of a longer autobiography or of separate, shorter autobiographically-inspired essays. The various forms of autobiographical narrative can both reflect on personal experience and comment on larger issues in society.This course explores, through reading and writing, what it means to construct a sense of self-and a life narrative-in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. What does it mean to see ourselves as embodying particular ethical values or belonging to a certain ethnic, racial, national or religious group(s)? How do we imagine ourselves within larger "family narrative(s)" The reading and writing in this course will focus on the art of self-narrative or autobiographical writing. Such writing can be crafted in the form of a longer autobiography or of separate, shorter autobiographically-inspired essays. The various forms of autobiographical narrative can both reflect on personal experience and comment on larger issues in society.This course explores, through reading and writing, what it means to construct a sense of self-and a life narrative-in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. What does it mean to see ourselves as embodying particular ethical values or belonging to a certain ethnic, racial, national or religious group(s)? How do we imagine ourselves within larger "family narrative(s)"

Subjects

writing | writing | autobiography | autobiography | non-fiction | non-fiction | fiction | fiction | essay | essay | experience | experience | memoir | memoir

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT) 21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

This is a course focused on the literary genre of the essay, that wide-ranging, elastic, and currently very popular form that attracts not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers, poets, scientists, physicians, and others to write in the form, and readers of every stripe to read it. Some say we are living in era in which the essay is enjoying a renaissance; certainly essays, both short and long, are at present easier to get published than are short stories or novels, and essays are featured regularly and prominently in the mainstream press (both magazines and newspapers) and on the New York Times bestseller books list. But the essay has a history, too, a long one, which goes back at least to the sixteenth-century French writer Montaigne, generally considered the progenitor of the This is a course focused on the literary genre of the essay, that wide-ranging, elastic, and currently very popular form that attracts not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers, poets, scientists, physicians, and others to write in the form, and readers of every stripe to read it. Some say we are living in era in which the essay is enjoying a renaissance; certainly essays, both short and long, are at present easier to get published than are short stories or novels, and essays are featured regularly and prominently in the mainstream press (both magazines and newspapers) and on the New York Times bestseller books list. But the essay has a history, too, a long one, which goes back at least to the sixteenth-century French writer Montaigne, generally considered the progenitor of the

Subjects

Writing | Writing | reading | reading | essay | essay | iterary genre | iterary genre | nonfiction writers | nonfiction writers | fiction writers | fiction writers | poets | poets | scientists | scientists | physicians | physicians | Didion | Didion | Bacon | Bacon | White | White | E.B. | E.B. | Walker | Walker | Oates | Oates | Orwell | Orwell | Gould | Gould | Wolfe | Wolfe | Woolf | Woolf | Eiseley | Eiseley | White | E.B. | White | E.B.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

In this class, you will read, think about, and (I hope) enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today, if not the most popular: the novel. Some of the questions we will consider are: Why did so many novels appear in the eighteenth century? Why were they—and are they—called novels? Who wrote them? Who read them? Who narrates them? What are they likely to be about? Do they have distinctive characteristics? What is their relationship to the time and place in which they appeared? How have they changed over the years? And, most of all, why do we like to read them so much? In this class, you will read, think about, and (I hope) enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today, if not the most popular: the novel. Some of the questions we will consider are: Why did so many novels appear in the eighteenth century? Why were they—and are they—called novels? Who wrote them? Who read them? Who narrates them? What are they likely to be about? Do they have distinctive characteristics? What is their relationship to the time and place in which they appeared? How have they changed over the years? And, most of all, why do we like to read them so much?

Subjects

novel | novel | literary genre | literary genre | narrator | narrator | daniel defoe | daniel defoe | moll flanders | moll flanders | frances burney | frances burney | evelina | evelina | jane austen | jane austen | pride and prejudice | pride and prejudice | elizabeth gaskell | elizabeth gaskell | mary barton | mary barton | george eliot | george eliot | adam bede | adam bede | mary elizabeth braddon | mary elizabeth braddon | lady audley's secret | lady audley's secret | thomas hardy | thomas hardy | tess of the d'urbervilles | tess of the d'urbervilles | virginia woolf | virginia woolf | mrs. dalloway | mrs. dalloway | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.007 World Literatures: Travel Writing (MIT) 21L.007 World Literatures: Travel Writing (MIT)

Description

This semester, we will read writing about travel and place from Columbus's Diario through the present. Travel writing has some special features that will shape both the content and the work for this subject: reflecting the point of view, narrative choices, and style of individuals, it also responds to the pressures of a real world only marginally under their control. Whether the traveler is a curious tourist, the leader of a national expedition, or a starving, half-naked survivor, the encounter with place shapes what travel writing can be. Accordingly, we will pay attention not only to narrative texts but to maps, objects, archives, and facts of various kinds. Our materials are organized around three regions: North America, Africa and the Atlantic world, the Arctic and Antarctic. The hist This semester, we will read writing about travel and place from Columbus's Diario through the present. Travel writing has some special features that will shape both the content and the work for this subject: reflecting the point of view, narrative choices, and style of individuals, it also responds to the pressures of a real world only marginally under their control. Whether the traveler is a curious tourist, the leader of a national expedition, or a starving, half-naked survivor, the encounter with place shapes what travel writing can be. Accordingly, we will pay attention not only to narrative texts but to maps, objects, archives, and facts of various kinds. Our materials are organized around three regions: North America, Africa and the Atlantic world, the Arctic and Antarctic. The hist

Subjects

world | world | travel | travel | writing | writing | columbus | columbus | literature | literature | north america | north america | french | french | history | history | europe | europe | caribbean | caribbean | brazil | brazil | modern | modern | religion | religion | ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | shakespeare | shakespeare | defoe | defoe | rowlandson | rowlandson | walcott | walcott | montaigne | montaigne | de lery | de lery | coetzee | coetzee | essay | essay | narrative | narrative | novel | novel | poetry | poetry | drama | drama | film | film | report | report

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT) 21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web. As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web.

Subjects

reading | reading | writing | writing | essay | essay | literary | literary | rhetorical | rhetorical | tradition | tradition | genre | genre | prose | prose | antiquity | antiquity | modern | modern | popular | popular | form | form | print | print | media | media | web | web | functions | functions | commentary | commentary | others | others | textual | textual | numerical | numerical | data | data | discovery | discovery | meaning | meaning | personal experience | personal experience | narration | narration | specialized | specialized | knowledge | knowledge | general | general | audience. | audience.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.732-5 Introduction to Technical Communication: Explorations in Scientific and Technical Writing (MIT) 21W.732-5 Introduction to Technical Communication: Explorations in Scientific and Technical Writing (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to produce clear and effective scientific and technical documents. We will focus on basic principles of good writing-which scientific and technical writing shares with other forms of writing-and on types of documents common in scientific and technical fields and organizations. While the emphasis will be on writing, oral communication of scientific and technical information will form an important component of the course, as well. This course is designed to help you develop skills that will enable you to produce clear and effective scientific and technical documents. We will focus on basic principles of good writing-which scientific and technical writing shares with other forms of writing-and on types of documents common in scientific and technical fields and organizations. While the emphasis will be on writing, oral communication of scientific and technical information will form an important component of the course, as well.

Subjects

scienticifc writing | scienticifc writing | scientific documents | scientific documents | technical documents | technical documents | argument | argument | review | review | critique | critique | graphics | graphics | email | email | webpage writing | webpage writing | webpage design | webpage design | literature reivew | literature reivew | narrative essay | narrative essay | technical description | technical description | design proposal | design proposal

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT) 21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience. This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience.

Subjects

Expository writing | Expository writing | analyzing | analyzing | mass | mass | media | media | voice | voice | academic | academic | writing | writing | self-discovery | self-discovery | critical thinking | critical thinking | communicating | communicating | audience | audience | drafting | drafting | revising | revising | essays | essays

License

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21L.470 Eighteenth-Century Literature: Versions of the Self in 18th-C Britain (MIT) 21L.470 Eighteenth-Century Literature: Versions of the Self in 18th-C Britain (MIT)

Description

When John Locke declared (in the 1690 Essay Concerning Human Understanding) that knowledge was derived solely from experience, he raised the possibility that human understanding and identity were not the products of God's will or of immutable laws of nature so much as of one's personal history and background. If on the one hand Locke's theory led some to pronounce that individuals could determine the course of their own lives, however, the idea that we are the products of our experience just as readily supported the conviction that we are nothing more than machines acting out lives whose destinies we do not control. This course will track the formulation of that problem, and a variety of responses to it, in the literature of the "long eighteenth century." Readings will range widely ac When John Locke declared (in the 1690 Essay Concerning Human Understanding) that knowledge was derived solely from experience, he raised the possibility that human understanding and identity were not the products of God's will or of immutable laws of nature so much as of one's personal history and background. If on the one hand Locke's theory led some to pronounce that individuals could determine the course of their own lives, however, the idea that we are the products of our experience just as readily supported the conviction that we are nothing more than machines acting out lives whose destinies we do not control. This course will track the formulation of that problem, and a variety of responses to it, in the literature of the "long eighteenth century." Readings will range widely ac

Subjects

lyric poetry | lyric poetry | novel | novel | diary entries | diary entries | philosophical prose | philosophical prose | political essays | political essays | Alexander Pope | Alexander Pope | Jonathan Swift | Jonathan Swift | Mary Astell | Mary Astell | David Hume | David Hume | Laurence Sterne | Laurence Sterne | Olaudah Equiano | Olaudah Equiano | Mary Hays | Mary Hays | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | construction of gender | construction of gender | imagination | imagination

License

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21W.731-3 Culture Shock! (MIT) 21W.731-3 Culture Shock! (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience--specifically, prose grounded in, but not confined to, personal narrative. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of articles that address current issues in popular culture along with essays, pieces of carefully-crafted nonfiction, by writers, scientists, philosophers, poets, historians, literary scholars, and many others. These essays will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world, using personal narrative and memoir to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal in the variet This course is an introduction to writing prose for a public audience--specifically, prose grounded in, but not confined to, personal narrative. That is, you will write essays that engage elements and aspects of contemporary American popular culture and that do so via a vivid personal voice and presence. In the coming weeks we will read a number of articles that address current issues in popular culture along with essays, pieces of carefully-crafted nonfiction, by writers, scientists, philosophers, poets, historians, literary scholars, and many others. These essays will address a great many subjects from the contemporary world, using personal narrative and memoir to launch and elaborate an argument or position or refined observation. And you yourselves will write a great deal in the variet

Subjects

personal narrative | personal narrative | public audience | public audience | American popular culture | American popular culture | personal voice | personal voice | nonfiction | nonfiction | memoir | memoir | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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