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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts. Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts.

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | reading | reading | writing | writing | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary texts | literary texts | Dickinson | Dickinson | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Hughes | Hughes | Chekhov | Chekhov | Joyce | Joyce | Walker | Walker | Melville | Melville | Morrison | Morrison | analytical skills | analytical skills | essays | essays | analysis | analysis | communication | communication | poetry | poetry | fiction | fiction | drama | drama | Lahiri | Lahiri | Frayn | Frayn | textuality | textuality | conceptualization | conceptualization | film | film | media | media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT) 21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course is a workshop for students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or others', in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate. This course is a workshop for students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or others', in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate.

Subjects

Workshop | Workshop | advanced students | advanced students | writing | writing | essays | essays | nonfiction | nonfiction | prose | prose | identities | identities | gender | gender | race | race | class | class | nationality | nationality | sexuality | sexuality | identity | identity | expository | expository | exploratory | exploratory | investigative | investigative | persuasive | persuasive | lyrical | lyrical | incantatory | incantatory | determinants of identity | determinants of identity | intersect | intersect | compete | compete | cooperate | cooperate

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT) 21W.730-4 Expository Writing: Analyzing Mass Media (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience. This course focuses on developing and refining the skills that will you need to express your voice more effectively as an academic writer. As a focus for our writing this semester, this course explores what it means to live in the age of mass media. We will debate the power of popular American media in shaping our ideas of self, family and community and in defining social issues. Throughout the semester, students will focus on writing as a process of drafting and revising to create essays that are lively, clear, engaging and meaningful to a wider audience.

Subjects

Expository writing | Expository writing | analyzing | analyzing | mass | mass | media | media | voice | voice | academic | academic | writing | writing | self-discovery | self-discovery | critical thinking | critical thinking | communicating | communicating | audience | audience | drafting | drafting | revising | revising | essays | essays

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.470 Eighteenth-Century Literature: Versions of the Self in 18th-C Britain (MIT) 21L.470 Eighteenth-Century Literature: Versions of the Self in 18th-C Britain (MIT)

Description

When John Locke declared (in the 1690 Essay Concerning Human Understanding) that knowledge was derived solely from experience, he raised the possibility that human understanding and identity were not the products of God's will or of immutable laws of nature so much as of one's personal history and background. If on the one hand Locke's theory led some to pronounce that individuals could determine the course of their own lives, however, the idea that we are the products of our experience just as readily supported the conviction that we are nothing more than machines acting out lives whose destinies we do not control. This course will track the formulation of that problem, and a variety of responses to it, in the literature of the "long eighteenth century." Readings will range widely ac When John Locke declared (in the 1690 Essay Concerning Human Understanding) that knowledge was derived solely from experience, he raised the possibility that human understanding and identity were not the products of God's will or of immutable laws of nature so much as of one's personal history and background. If on the one hand Locke's theory led some to pronounce that individuals could determine the course of their own lives, however, the idea that we are the products of our experience just as readily supported the conviction that we are nothing more than machines acting out lives whose destinies we do not control. This course will track the formulation of that problem, and a variety of responses to it, in the literature of the "long eighteenth century." Readings will range widely ac

Subjects

lyric poetry | lyric poetry | novel | novel | diary entries | diary entries | philosophical prose | philosophical prose | political essays | political essays | Alexander Pope | Alexander Pope | Jonathan Swift | Jonathan Swift | Mary Astell | Mary Astell | David Hume | David Hume | Laurence Sterne | Laurence Sterne | Olaudah Equiano | Olaudah Equiano | Mary Hays | Mary Hays | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | construction of gender | construction of gender | imagination | imagination

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.772 Digital Poetry (MIT) 21W.772 Digital Poetry (MIT)

Description

This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis. This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis.

Subjects

Digital | Digital | poetry | poetry | theory | theory | practice | practice | new media | new media | workshop | workshop | soundscapes | soundscapes | hypertext poetry | hypertext poetry | animation | animation | code poems | code poems | interactive games | interactive games | location-based poems | location-based poems | handheld devices | handheld devices | digital video | digital video | wikis | wikis | essays | essays | experimental art | experimental art

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.703 Spanish 3 (MIT) 21G.703 Spanish 3 (MIT)

Description

The first intermediate-level course in Spanish, with a focus on grammar review, additional vocabulary, writing of essays in Spanish and enhancement of cultural awareness. Group activities and projects, and conversation are emphasized.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc. The first intermediate-level course in Spanish, with a focus on grammar review, additional vocabulary, writing of essays in Spanish and enhancement of cultural awareness. Group activities and projects, and conversation are emphasized.Technical RequirementsRealOne™ Player software is required to run the .rm files found on this course site.RealOne™ is a trademark or a registered trademark of RealNetworks, Inc.

Subjects

Spanish | Spanish | Spanish grammar | Spanish grammar | Spanish vocabulary | Spanish vocabulary | writing | writing | essays | essays | Culture | Culture | cultural awareness | cultural awareness | conversation | conversation | MITUPV | MITUPV

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: "What's the Use of Beauty?" (MIT)

Description

This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays. This course explores variations on the proposition that an adequate recognition of beauty could, however indirectly, make you a more humane person. Readings extend widely across literary and non-literary genres, including lyric poetry and the novel, philosophical prose and essays.

Subjects

Extensive reading | Extensive reading | major poets | major poets | evolution of each poet's work | evolution of each poet's work | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | questions of poetic influence and literary tradition | recognition of beauty | recognition of beauty | justice | justice | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | lyric poetry | novel | philosophical prose and essays | British literary authors | British literary authors | 19th century | 19th century | literature | literature | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | foundational works in aesthetics from philosophers including Plato and Immanuel Kant | as well as 20th-century aesthetic theorists including Theodor Adorno | Jean-Paul Sartre | and Elaine Scarry | Wordsworth | Keats | Wordsworth | Keats | Mary Robinson | Mary Robinson | Mary and Percy Shelley | Mary and Percy Shelley | Thomas De Quincey | Thomas De Quincey | Dickens | Dickens | Walter Pater | Walter Pater | Wilde | Wilde

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Essays on literature Essays on literature

Description

ebook version of Essays on literature ebook version of Essays on literature

Subjects

kind | kind | American essays -- 19th century | American essays -- 19th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.470 Eighteenth-Century Literature: Versions of the Self in 18th-C Britain (MIT) 21L.470 Eighteenth-Century Literature: Versions of the Self in 18th-C Britain (MIT)

Description

When John Locke declared (in the 1690 Essay Concerning Human Understanding) that knowledge was derived solely from experience, he raised the possibility that human understanding and identity were not the products of God's will or of immutable laws of nature so much as of one's personal history and background. If on the one hand Locke's theory led some to pronounce that individuals could determine the course of their own lives, however, the idea that we are the products of our experience just as readily supported the conviction that we are nothing more than machines acting out lives whose destinies we do not control. This course will track the formulation of that problem, and a variety of responses to it, in the literature of the "long eighteenth century." Readings will range widely ac When John Locke declared (in the 1690 Essay Concerning Human Understanding) that knowledge was derived solely from experience, he raised the possibility that human understanding and identity were not the products of God's will or of immutable laws of nature so much as of one's personal history and background. If on the one hand Locke's theory led some to pronounce that individuals could determine the course of their own lives, however, the idea that we are the products of our experience just as readily supported the conviction that we are nothing more than machines acting out lives whose destinies we do not control. This course will track the formulation of that problem, and a variety of responses to it, in the literature of the "long eighteenth century." Readings will range widely ac

Subjects

lyric poetry | lyric poetry | novel | novel | diary entries | diary entries | philosophical prose | philosophical prose | political essays | political essays | Alexander Pope | Alexander Pope | Jonathan Swift | Jonathan Swift | Mary Astell | Mary Astell | David Hume | David Hume | Laurence Sterne | Laurence Sterne | Olaudah Equiano | Olaudah Equiano | Mary Hays | Mary Hays | Mary Shelley | Mary Shelley | construction of gender | construction of gender | imagination | imagination

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.325J New Culture of Gender: Queer France (MIT) 21G.325J New Culture of Gender: Queer France (MIT)

Description

This course addresses the place of contemporary queer identities in French discourse and discusses the new generation of queer authors and their principal concerns. Class discussions and readings will introduce students to the main classical references of queer subcultures, from Proust and Vivien to Hocquenghem and Wittig. Throughout the course, students will examines current debates on post-colonial and globalized queer identities through essays, songs, movies, and novels. Authors covered include Didier Eribon, Anne Garréta, Abdellah Taïa, Anne Scott, and Nina Bouraoui. This class is taught in French. This course addresses the place of contemporary queer identities in French discourse and discusses the new generation of queer authors and their principal concerns. Class discussions and readings will introduce students to the main classical references of queer subcultures, from Proust and Vivien to Hocquenghem and Wittig. Throughout the course, students will examines current debates on post-colonial and globalized queer identities through essays, songs, movies, and novels. Authors covered include Didier Eribon, Anne Garréta, Abdellah Taïa, Anne Scott, and Nina Bouraoui. This class is taught in French.

Subjects

21G.325 | 21G.325 | WGS.233 | WGS.233 | queer identities | queer identities | French | French | Proust | Proust | Vivien | Vivien | Hocquenghem | Hocquenghem | Wittig | Wittig | post-colonial | post-colonial | essays | essays | films | films | novels | novels | Didier Eribon | Didier Eribon | Duras | Duras | homosexualité | homosexualité

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.412 Texts, Topics, and Times in German Literature (MIT) 21G.412 Texts, Topics, and Times in German Literature (MIT)

Description

In diesem Kurs erhalten Sie einen Überblick über einige wichtige literarische Texte, Tendenzen und Themen aus der deutschsprachigen Literatur- und Kulturszene. Wir werden literarische Texte, Gedichte, Theaterstücke und Essays untersuchen, sowie andere ästhetische Formen besprechen, wie Film und Architektur. Da alle Texte gleichzeitig in ihrem spezifischen kulturellen Kontext gelesen werden, tragen sie zu einem Verständnis von verschiedenen historischen Aspekten bei. Unter anderen werden folgende Themen und Fragestellungen besprochen: Technologie und deren Einfluss auf die Gesellschaft, Fragen der Ethik bei wissenschaftlicher Arbeit, Konstruktion von nationaler Geschichte und kollektivem Gedächtnis. In diesem Kurs erhalten Sie einen Überblick über einige wichtige literarische Texte, Tendenzen und Themen aus der deutschsprachigen Literatur- und Kulturszene. Wir werden literarische Texte, Gedichte, Theaterstücke und Essays untersuchen, sowie andere ästhetische Formen besprechen, wie Film und Architektur. Da alle Texte gleichzeitig in ihrem spezifischen kulturellen Kontext gelesen werden, tragen sie zu einem Verständnis von verschiedenen historischen Aspekten bei. Unter anderen werden folgende Themen und Fragestellungen besprochen: Technologie und deren Einfluss auf die Gesellschaft, Fragen der Ethik bei wissenschaftlicher Arbeit, Konstruktion von nationaler Geschichte und kollektivem Gedächtnis.

Subjects

modern German literature | modern German literature | lyric poetry | lyric poetry | drama | drama | film | film | poetry | poetry | radio plays | radio plays | architecture | architecture | translation and interpretation | translation and interpretation | essays | essays | cultural context | cultural context | scientific ethics | scientific ethics | technology | technology | construction of national history | construction of national history | the Holocaust | the Holocaust | 20th century Germany | 20th century Germany

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.703 Spanish III (MIT) 21G.703 Spanish III (MIT)

Description

This course is the first intermediate-level course in Spanish, with a focus on grammar review, additional vocabulary, writing of essays in Spanish and enhancement of cultural awareness. Group activities and projects, and conversation are emphasized. There are detailed simulation activities, readings about literature and art from Latin America and Spain, activities with music videos and interviews, and viewings of recent films such as El espinazo del diablo, Juana la loca, and María llena eres de gracia. Students also participate in the MITUPV Exchange project, a multimedia-centered Web site that deals with university life at MIT, the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia in Spain, and other universities. This course is the first intermediate-level course in Spanish, with a focus on grammar review, additional vocabulary, writing of essays in Spanish and enhancement of cultural awareness. Group activities and projects, and conversation are emphasized. There are detailed simulation activities, readings about literature and art from Latin America and Spain, activities with music videos and interviews, and viewings of recent films such as El espinazo del diablo, Juana la loca, and María llena eres de gracia. Students also participate in the MITUPV Exchange project, a multimedia-centered Web site that deals with university life at MIT, the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia in Spain, and other universities.

Subjects

Spanish | Spanish | Spanish grammar | Spanish grammar | Spanish vocabulary | Spanish vocabulary | writing | writing | essays | essays | Culture | Culture | cultural awareness | cultural awareness | conversation | conversation | MITUPV | MITUPV

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-2 Expository Writing - Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about Food and Culture (MIT) 21W.730-2 Expository Writing - Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about Food and Culture (MIT)

Description

"Civilization is mostly the story of how seeds, meats, and ways to cook them travel from place to place." - Adam Gopnik, "What's Cooking.""A significant part of the pleasure of eating is in one's accurate consciousness of the lives and the world from which food comes." - Wendell Berry, "The Pleasures of Eating."If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. The aroma of turkey roasting or the taste of green tea can be a portal to memories, while too many Big Macs can clog our arteries. The chef is an artist, yet those who pick oranges or process meat may be little more than slaves. In this class, we will explore many of the fascinating iss "Civilization is mostly the story of how seeds, meats, and ways to cook them travel from place to place." - Adam Gopnik, "What's Cooking.""A significant part of the pleasure of eating is in one's accurate consciousness of the lives and the world from which food comes." - Wendell Berry, "The Pleasures of Eating."If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. The aroma of turkey roasting or the taste of green tea can be a portal to memories, while too many Big Macs can clog our arteries. The chef is an artist, yet those who pick oranges or process meat may be little more than slaves. In this class, we will explore many of the fascinating iss

Subjects

Expository | Expository | writing | writing | food | food | thought | thought | life | life | symbol | symbol | it earth | it earth | families | families | cultures | cultures | The aroma of turkey memories | The aroma of turkey memories | chef | chef | artist | artist | family meals | family meals | art | art | science | science | cooking | cooking | fair trade | fair trade | eating disorders | eating disorders | Fast Food Nation | Fast Food Nation | films | films | videos | videos | personal narratives | personal narratives | essays | essays | research | research | workshop. | workshop.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT) 21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course is a workshop for advanced students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or other's, in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate. This course is a workshop for advanced students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or other's, in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate.

Subjects

workshop | workshop | advanced students | advanced students | writing | writing | essays | essays | nonfiction | nonfiction | prose | prose | identities | identities | gender | gender | race | race | class | class | nationality | nationality | sexuality | sexuality | identity | identity | expository | expository | exploratory | exploratory | investigative | investigative | persuasive | persuasive | lyrical | lyrical | incantatory | incantatory | determinants of identity | determinants of identity | intersect | intersect | compete | compete | cooperate | cooperate | SP.576 | SP.576

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT) 16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT)

Description

This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj

Subjects

Expository writing | Expository writing | analyzing | analyzing | mass | mass | media | media | voice | voice | academic | academic | writing | writing | self-discovery | self-discovery | critical thinking | critical thinking | communicating | communicating | audience | audience | drafting | drafting | revising | revising | essays | essays | analysis techniques | analysis techniques | complex structures | complex structures | material properties | material properties | structural design | structural design | failure | failure | longevity | longevity | Energy principles | Energy principles | structural analysis | structural analysis | statically-indeterminate structures | statically-indeterminate structures | solid continua | solid continua | Crack formation | Crack formation | fracture mechanics | fracture mechanics | failure modes | failure modes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.412 Texts, Topics, and Times in German Literature (MIT)

Description

In diesem Kurs erhalten Sie einen berblick ber einige wichtige literarische Texte, Tendenzen und Themen aus der deutschsprachigen Literatur- und Kulturszene. Wir werden literarische Texte, Gedichte, Theaterstcke und Essays untersuchen, sowie andere sthetische Formen besprechen, wie Film und Architektur. Da alle Texte gleichzeitig in ihrem spezifischen kulturellen Kontext gelesen werden, tragen sie zu einem Verstndnis von verschiedenen historischen Aspekten bei. Unter anderen werden folgende Themen und Fragestellungen besprochen: Technologie und deren Einfluss auf die Gesellschaft, Fragen der Ethik bei wissenschaftlicher Arbeit, Konstruktion von nationaler Geschichte und kollektivem Gedchtnis.

Subjects

modern German literature | lyric poetry | drama | film | poetry | radio plays | architecture | translation and interpretation | essays | cultural context | scientific ethics | technology | construction of national history | the Holocaust | 20th century Germany

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Study skills : revision (VLE version)

Description

This resource is designed to help students with revision. It explains the importance and purpose of revision, and provides revision tips such as following a timetable and making revision activity based. It then describes five different revision techniques, such as course mapping, mnemonics and the Swedish model (study circles), which students could adapt for their own purposes.

Subjects

revision | revision tips | revision techniques | study skills | study circles | course mapping | mnemonics | practice essays | master summary sheets | Education | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | Employability | Learning | Design and delivery of programmes | UK EL06 = SCQF 6 | Advanced courses | NICAT 3 | CQFW 3 | Advanced | A/AS Level | NVQ 3 | Higher | SVQ 3 | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | UK EL08 = SCQF 8 | Higher Diploma | NICAT 5 | CQFW 5 | HN Diploma | Diploma in HE | UK EL09 = SCQF 9 | Ordinary degree | NICAT 6 | CQFW 6 | NVQ 5 | SVQ 5 | Ordinary degree | Graduate certific | UK EL10 = SCQF 10 | Honours degree | Graduate diploma | X000 | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.772 Digital Poetry (MIT)

Description

This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis.

Subjects

Digital | poetry | theory | practice | new media | workshop | soundscapes | hypertext poetry | animation | code poems | interactive games | location-based poems | handheld devices | digital video | wikis | essays | experimental art

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Essay writing

Description

This OER is intended to assist with advice and guidance to students on Essay Writing. This interactive resource focuses on improving the structure of your essays by giving you the opportunity to select options most relevant to your experience. It then provides you with a series of priority actions which should assist you in adopting sound essay writing and structuring techniques.

Subjects

ukoer | essays | essay writing | leicester university | otter | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.470 Eighteenth-Century Literature: Versions of the Self in 18th-C Britain (MIT)

Description

When John Locke declared (in the 1690 Essay Concerning Human Understanding) that knowledge was derived solely from experience, he raised the possibility that human understanding and identity were not the products of God's will or of immutable laws of nature so much as of one's personal history and background. If on the one hand Locke's theory led some to pronounce that individuals could determine the course of their own lives, however, the idea that we are the products of our experience just as readily supported the conviction that we are nothing more than machines acting out lives whose destinies we do not control. This course will track the formulation of that problem, and a variety of responses to it, in the literature of the "long eighteenth century." Readings will range widely ac

Subjects

lyric poetry | novel | diary entries | philosophical prose | political essays | Alexander Pope | Jonathan Swift | Mary Astell | David Hume | Laurence Sterne | Olaudah Equiano | Mary Hays | Mary Shelley | construction of gender | imagination

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.703 Spanish III (MIT)

Description

This course is the first intermediate-level course in Spanish, with a focus on grammar review, additional vocabulary, writing of essays in Spanish and enhancement of cultural awareness. Group activities and projects, and conversation are emphasized. There are detailed simulation activities, readings about literature and art from Latin America and Spain, activities with music videos and interviews, and viewings of recent films such as El espinazo del diablo, Juana la loca, and Mara llena eres de gracia. Students also participate in the MITUPV Exchange project, a multimedia-centered Web site that deals with university life at MIT, the Universidad Politcnica de Valencia in Spain, and other universities.

Subjects

Spanish | Spanish grammar | Spanish vocabulary | writing | essays | Culture | cultural awareness | conversation | MITUPV

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lolita with Imraan Coovadia

Description

Authors:  Imraan Coovadia Acclaimed novelist Imraan Coovadia spoke at UCT’s Gordon Institute for Performing and Creative Arts (GIPCA)’s Great Text / Big Questions public lecture on Thursday 1 April. Clicked 119 times. Last clicked 03/26/2014 - 00:37. Teaching & Learning Context:  <p>This lecture was delivered in an open forum.&nbsp; It may be used to supplement lectures on this topic or as general interest podcast.</p>

Subjects

Fine Art | Humanities | Audio | Audio Lectures | English | Post-secondary | book review | essays review | GIPCA | literature | public lecture

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/za/

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16.21 Techniques for Structural Analysis and Design (MIT)

Description

This course introduces analysis techniques for complex structures and the role of material properties in structural design, failure, and longevity. Students will learn about the energy principles in structural analysis and their applications to statically-indeterminate structures and solid continua. Additionally, the course will examine matrix and finite-element methods of structured analysis including bars, beams, and two-dimensional plane stress elements. Structural materials and their properties will be considered, as will metals and composites. Other topics include modes of structural failure, criteria for yielding and fracture, crack formation and fracture mechanics, and fatigue and design for longevity. Students are expected to apply these concepts to their own structural design proj

Subjects

Expository writing | analyzing | mass | media | voice | academic | writing | self-discovery | critical thinking | communicating | audience | drafting | revising | essays | analysis techniques | complex structures | material properties | structural design | failure | longevity | Energy principles | structural analysis | statically-indeterminate structures | solid continua | Crack formation | fracture mechanics | failure modes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-2 Expository Writing - Food for Thought: Writing and Reading about Food and Culture (MIT)

Description

"Civilization is mostly the story of how seeds, meats, and ways to cook them travel from place to place." - Adam Gopnik, "What's Cooking.""A significant part of the pleasure of eating is in one's accurate consciousness of the lives and the world from which food comes." - Wendell Berry, "The Pleasures of Eating."If you are what you eat, what are you? Food is at once the stuff of life and a potent symbol; it binds us to the earth, to our families, and to our cultures. The aroma of turkey roasting or the taste of green tea can be a portal to memories, while too many Big Macs can clog our arteries. The chef is an artist, yet those who pick oranges or process meat may be little more than slaves. In this class, we will explore many of the fascinating iss

Subjects

Expository | writing | food | thought | life | symbol | it earth | families | cultures | The aroma of turkey memories | chef | artist | family meals | art | science | cooking | fair trade | eating disorders | Fast Food Nation | films | videos | personal narratives | essays | research | workshop.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course is a workshop for advanced students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or other's, in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate.

Subjects

workshop | advanced students | writing | essays | nonfiction | prose | identities | gender | race | class | nationality | sexuality | identity | expository | exploratory | investigative | persuasive | lyrical | incantatory | determinants of identity | intersect | compete | cooperate | SP.576

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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