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HST.590 Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series: Topics in Medical Ethics and Responsible Conduct in Research (MIT) HST.590 Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series: Topics in Medical Ethics and Responsible Conduct in Research (MIT)

Description

This seminar based course explores techniques for recognizing, analyzing, and resolving ethical dilemmas facing healthcare professionals and biomedical researchers in today's highly regulated environment. Guest lectures by practicing clinicians, technologists, researchers, and regulators will include case studies, interactive small group discussions, and role-playing simulations. Professional conduct topics will include authorship, conflict of interest, data acquisition and management, and the protection of human subjects and animals involved in research programs. This seminar based course explores techniques for recognizing, analyzing, and resolving ethical dilemmas facing healthcare professionals and biomedical researchers in today's highly regulated environment. Guest lectures by practicing clinicians, technologists, researchers, and regulators will include case studies, interactive small group discussions, and role-playing simulations. Professional conduct topics will include authorship, conflict of interest, data acquisition and management, and the protection of human subjects and animals involved in research programs.

Subjects

ethics | ethics | medical ethics | medical ethics | responsible research | responsible research | responsible conduct | responsible conduct | ethical dilemmas | ethical dilemmas | professional conduct | professional conduct | ethical issues | ethical issues | collaboration | collaboration | risk management | risk management | personal integrity | personal integrity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.003 Principles of Engineering Practice (MIT) 3.003 Principles of Engineering Practice (MIT)

Description

This class introduces students to the interdisciplinary nature of 21st-century engineering projects with three threads of learning: a technical toolkit, a social science toolkit, and a methodology for problem-based learning. Students encounter the social, political, economic, and technological challenges of engineering practice by participating in real engineering projects with faculty and industry; this semester's major project focuses on the engineering and economics of solar cells. Student teams will create prototypes and mixed media reports with exercises in project planning, analysis, design, optimization, demonstration, reporting and team building. This class introduces students to the interdisciplinary nature of 21st-century engineering projects with three threads of learning: a technical toolkit, a social science toolkit, and a methodology for problem-based learning. Students encounter the social, political, economic, and technological challenges of engineering practice by participating in real engineering projects with faculty and industry; this semester's major project focuses on the engineering and economics of solar cells. Student teams will create prototypes and mixed media reports with exercises in project planning, analysis, design, optimization, demonstration, reporting and team building.

Subjects

ethical engineering | ethical engineering | communication | communication | technical writing | technical writing | inventions | inventions | patents | patents | transportation | transportation | infrastructure | infrastructure | sustainable materials | sustainable materials | photovoltaic cell | photovoltaic cell | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Creating an ethical organisation

Description

Businesses are increasingly making explicit their committment to dealing with ethical concerns. This unit explores the business case for an ethical approach to human resources management and examines whether a more 'human-centred' approach can bring dividends, and how an ethical approach fits within an organisation's strategy.

Subjects

business and management | ethical_approaches | ethical_concerns | ethics | human_resources | organisation | organisation_strategy | strategy | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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24.231 Ethics (MIT) 24.231 Ethics (MIT)

Description

This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why? This will be a seminar on classic and contemporary work on central topics in ethics. The first third of the course will focus on metaethics: we will examine the meaning of moral claims and ask whether there is any sense in which moral principles are objectively valid. The second third of the course will focus on normative ethics: what makes our lives worth living, what makes our actions right or wrong, and what do we owe to others? The final third of the course will focus on moral character: what is virtue, and how important is it? Can we be held responsible for what we do? When and why?

Subjects

ethics | ethics | euthyphro | euthyphro | Plato | Plato | goodness | goodness | non-naturalism | non-naturalism | G. E. Moore | G. E. Moore | non-cognitivism | non-cognitivism | Alfred Jules Ayer | Alfred Jules Ayer | David Brink | David Brink | cognitivism | cognitivism | Gilbert Harman | Gilbert Harman | Nicholas Sturgeon | Nicholas Sturgeon | observation | observation | morality | morality | moral relativism | moral relativism | Philippa Foot | Philippa Foot | David Lyons | David Lyons | incoherence | incoherence | ethical relativism | ethical relativism | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | Robert Nozick | Robert Nozick | Derek Parfit | Derek Parfit | Alastair Norcross | Alastair Norcross | philosophy | philosophy | Bernard Williams | Bernard Williams | James Lenman | James Lenman | consequentialism | consequentialism | cluelessness | cluelessness | Peter Singer | Peter Singer | act-utilitarianism | act-utilitarianism | John Rawls | John Rawls | rules | rules | Thomas Nagel | Thomas Nagel | famine | famine | affluence | affluence | Nomy Arpaly | Nomy Arpaly | moral worth | moral worth | Susan Wolf | Susan Wolf | moral saints | moral saints | Peter van Inwagen | Peter van Inwagen | free will | free will | determinism | determinism | Harry Frankfurt | Harry Frankfurt | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | moral luck | moral luck

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT) 24.120 Moral Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course. This course is an examination of philosophical theories of action and motivation in the light of empirical findings from social psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. Topics include belief, desire, and moral motivation; sympathy and empathy; intentions and other committing states; strength of will and weakness of will; free will; addiction and compulsion; guilt, shame and regret; evil; self-knowledge and self-deception; and, virtues and character traits. This course is a CI-M course.

Subjects

action | action | motivation | motivation | social psychology | social psychology | sociology | sociology | belief | belief | desire | desire | moral motivation | moral motivation | sympathy | sympathy | empathy | empathy | intention | intention | will | will | addiction | addiction | resolution | resolution | rationality | rationality | identification | identification | autonomy | autonomy | egoism | egoism | altruism | altruism | intentions | intentions | Humean theory of motivation | Humean theory of motivation | willing | willing | wanting | wanting | waiting | waiting | weakness | weakness | Akrasia | Akrasia | self-control | self-control | temptation | temptation | self-regulation | self-regulation | free will | free will | self-deception | self-deception | moral psychology | moral psychology | empirical work | empirical work | autism | autism | ethical judgment | ethical judgment | moral luck | moral luck | virtue | virtue

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Population Paradox

Description

Professor David Coleman, Dr George Leeson and Dr Nando Sigona discuss the global issues relating to the world's rising population at the Alumni Weekend Conference 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethical | paradox | global | alumni | sustainability | rising | migration | population | ethical | paradox | global | alumni | sustainability | rising | migration | population | 2011-09-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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24.230 Meta-ethics (MIT) 24.230 Meta-ethics (MIT)

Description

This course considers a range of philosophical questions about the foundations of morality, such as whether and in what sense morality is objective, the nature of moral discourse, and how we can come to know right from wrong. This course considers a range of philosophical questions about the foundations of morality, such as whether and in what sense morality is objective, the nature of moral discourse, and how we can come to know right from wrong.

Subjects

moral statements | moral statements | morality | morality | ethics | ethics | ethical inquiry | ethical inquiry | scientific inquiry | scientific inquiry | right and wrong | right and wrong | moral realism | moral realism | plato | plato | naturalism | naturalism | moral anti-realism | moral anti-realism | non-cognitivism | non-cognitivism | reason | reason

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.590 Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series: Topics in Medical Ethics and Responsible Conduct in Research (MIT)

Description

This seminar based course explores techniques for recognizing, analyzing, and resolving ethical dilemmas facing healthcare professionals and biomedical researchers in today's highly regulated environment. Guest lectures by practicing clinicians, technologists, researchers, and regulators will include case studies, interactive small group discussions, and role-playing simulations. Professional conduct topics will include authorship, conflict of interest, data acquisition and management, and the protection of human subjects and animals involved in research programs.

Subjects

ethics | medical ethics | responsible research | responsible conduct | ethical dilemmas | professional conduct | ethical issues | collaboration | risk management | personal integrity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Ethics and politics

Description

Moral and Political Philosophy: how should we live? What constitutes a just state? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

political philosophy | philosophy | ethical philosophy | political philosophy | philosophy | ethical philosophy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Ethics and politics

Description

Moral and Political Philosophy: how should we live? What constitutes a just state? Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

political philosophy | philosophy | ethical philosophy | political philosophy | philosophy | ethical philosophy

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.800 Doctoral Research Seminar: Knowledge in the Public Arena (MIT) 11.800 Doctoral Research Seminar: Knowledge in the Public Arena (MIT)

Description

This is a course about how research knowledge and other types of knowledge come to be actionable and influential in the world — or not. The course explores ways to make research knowledge more accessible, credible, and useful in the realm of public policy and practice, a project in which the course faculty collectively bring decades of professional experience, in both academic and non-academic roles. The course addresses the politics of the policymaking process, the power of framing and agenda-setting, fads and paradigms in the design professions and society in general, how knowledge diffuses along knowledge and influence networks, and how varied types of knowledge (rational, craft, other) and deliberation shape decision-making and action. The course engages a number of guests to pre This is a course about how research knowledge and other types of knowledge come to be actionable and influential in the world — or not. The course explores ways to make research knowledge more accessible, credible, and useful in the realm of public policy and practice, a project in which the course faculty collectively bring decades of professional experience, in both academic and non-academic roles. The course addresses the politics of the policymaking process, the power of framing and agenda-setting, fads and paradigms in the design professions and society in general, how knowledge diffuses along knowledge and influence networks, and how varied types of knowledge (rational, craft, other) and deliberation shape decision-making and action. The course engages a number of guests to pre

Subjects

research knowledge | research knowledge | public policy and practice | public policy and practice | policymaking | policymaking | framing | framing | agenda-setting | agenda-setting | knowledge diffusion | knowledge diffusion | knowledge and influence networks | knowledge and influence networks | deliberation | deliberation | decision-making | decision-making | action | action | public values | public values | political interests | political interests | ethical obligations | ethical obligations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings. Drama might be described as a game played with something sacred. It tells stories that go right to the heart of what people believe about themselves. And it is enacted in the moment, which means it has an added layer of interpretive mystery and playfulness, or "theatricality." This course will explore theater and theatricality across periods and cultures, through intensive engagement with texts and with our own readings.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre architecture | theatre architecture | selective realism | selective realism | neoclassical ideals | neoclassical ideals | autos sacramentales | autos sacramentales | formal theatre | formal theatre | tiring house | tiring house | realistic theatre | realistic theatre | scene design | scene design | staging practices | staging practices | female playwrights | female playwrights | crisis drama | crisis drama | symbolist drama | symbolist drama | dramatic rules | dramatic rules | theatrical semiosis | theatrical semiosis | theatrical competence | theatrical competence | deictic orientation | deictic orientation | proxemic relations | proxemic relations | theatre semiotics | theatre semiotics | theatrical communication | theatrical communication | dramatic information | dramatic information | dramatic discourse | dramatic discourse | theatrical sign | theatrical sign | theatrical discourse | theatrical discourse | theatrical frame | theatrical frame | dramatic world | dramatic world | dramatic text | dramatic text | perlocutionary effect | perlocutionary effect | theatrical text | theatrical text | performance text | performance text

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT) 21L.703 Studies in Drama: Too Hot to Handle: Forbidden Plays in Modern America (MIT)

Description

Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w Unlike film, theater in America does not have a ratings board that censors content. So plays have had more freedom to explore and to transgress normative culture. Yet censorship of the theater has been part of American culture from the beginning, and continues today. How and why does this happen, and who decides whether a play is too dangerous to see or to teach? Are plays dangerous? Sinful? Even demonic? In our seminar, we will study plays that have been censored, either legally or extra-legally (i.e. refused production, closed down during production, denied funding, or taken off school reading lists). We'll look at laws, both national and local, relating to the "obscene", as well as unofficial practices, and think about the way censorship operates in American life now. And of course w

Subjects

drama | drama | forbidden plays | forbidden plays | Modern America | Modern America | decision alley | decision alley | drama strategies | drama strategies | drama skills | drama skills | purchasing institution | purchasing institution | drama activity | drama activity | drama activities | drama activities | writing opportunity | writing opportunity | last wolf | last wolf | learning medium | learning medium | literacy activities | literacy activities | writing opportunities | writing opportunities | foundation stage | foundation stage | assessment focus | assessment focus | two long lines | two long lines | dramatic activity | dramatic activity | action conventions | action conventions | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater | theater | outdoor public theatres | outdoor public theatres | scaena frons | scaena frons | many theatre artists | many theatre artists | violence onstage | violence onstage | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical theatre | neoclassical rules | neoclassical rules | medieval theatre | medieval theatre | environmental theatre | environmental theatre | departures from realism | departures from realism | significant playwrights | significant playwrights | first permanent theatre | first permanent theatre | theatre history | theatre history | theatre | theatre | censorship | censorship | blacklist | blacklist | banned | banned | obscenity | obscenity | architecture | architecture | selective realism | selective realism

License

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Lecture 33: Ethics in Games Lecture 33: Ethics in Games

Description

Description: Mia Consalvo asks students for examples illustrating how game designers construct ethical systems, how users act within those systems, and the role of community norms. How do players connect behavioral standards inside and outside the game world? Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Mia Consalvo (Comparative Media Studies)Keywords: ethical systems, violence, simulation, obscenity, morals, virtual economy, griefing, abstraction, censorship, geopolitics, community standards, social commentary, relativismTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Mia Consalvo asks students for examples illustrating how game designers construct ethical systems, how users act within those systems, and the role of community norms. How do players connect behavioral standards inside and outside the game world? Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Mia Consalvo (Comparative Media Studies)Keywords: ethical systems, violence, simulation, obscenity, morals, virtual economy, griefing, abstraction, censorship, geopolitics, community standards, social commentary, relativismTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

ethical systems | ethical systems | violence | violence | simulation | simulation | obscenity | obscenity | morals | morals | virtual economy | virtual economy | griefing | griefing | abstraction | abstraction | censorship | censorship | geopolitics | geopolitics | community standards | community standards | social commentary | social commentary | relativism | relativism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Population Paradox

Description

Professor David Coleman, Dr George Leeson and Dr Nando Sigona discuss the global issues relating to the world's rising population at the Alumni Weekend Conference 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethical | paradox | global | alumni | sustainability | rising | migration | population | ethical | paradox | global | alumni | sustainability | rising | migration | population | 2011-09-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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11.005 Introduction to International Development (MIT) 11.005 Introduction to International Development (MIT)

Description

This course introduces undergraduates to the basic theory, institutional architecture, and practice of international development. We take an applied, interdisciplinary approach to some of the "big questions" in our field. This course will unpack these questions by providing an overview of existing knowledge and best practices in the field. The goal of this class is to go beyond traditional dichotomies and narrow definitions of progress, well-being, and culture. Instead, we will invite students to develop a more nuanced understanding of international development by offering an innovative set of tools and content flexibility. This course introduces undergraduates to the basic theory, institutional architecture, and practice of international development. We take an applied, interdisciplinary approach to some of the "big questions" in our field. This course will unpack these questions by providing an overview of existing knowledge and best practices in the field. The goal of this class is to go beyond traditional dichotomies and narrow definitions of progress, well-being, and culture. Instead, we will invite students to develop a more nuanced understanding of international development by offering an innovative set of tools and content flexibility.

Subjects

international development | international development | poverty | poverty | development | development | governments | governments | markets | markets | structure | structure | agency | agency | wellbeing | wellbeing | progress | progress | culture | culture | policy | policy | socioeconomic | socioeconomic | colonialism | colonialism | ethical development | ethical development | identities | identities | modernization | modernization | growth paradigms | growth paradigms | development agenda | development agenda | industrialization | industrialization | debt crisis | debt crisis | globalization | globalization | washington consensus | washington consensus | institutions | institutions | continuous development | continuous development | bretton woods system | bretton woods system | cooperation | cooperation | NGOs | NGOs | non-governmental organization | non-governmental organization | capitalism | capitalism | private sector | private sector | development theory | development theory | international aid architecture | international aid architecture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Behavioral Genetics (MIT) Behavioral Genetics (MIT)

Description

How genetics can add to our understanding of cognition, language, emotion, personality, and behavior. Use of gene mapping to estimate risk factors for psychological disorders and variation in behavioral and personality traits. Mendelian genetics, genetic mapping techniques, and statistical analysis of large populations and their application to particular studies in behavioral genetics. Topics also include environmental influence on genetic programs, evolutionary genetics, and the larger scientific, social, ethical, and philosophical implications. How genetics can add to our understanding of cognition, language, emotion, personality, and behavior. Use of gene mapping to estimate risk factors for psychological disorders and variation in behavioral and personality traits. Mendelian genetics, genetic mapping techniques, and statistical analysis of large populations and their application to particular studies in behavioral genetics. Topics also include environmental influence on genetic programs, evolutionary genetics, and the larger scientific, social, ethical, and philosophical implications.

Subjects

cognition | cognition | language | language | emotion | emotion | personality | personality | behavior | behavior | gene mapping | gene mapping | personality traits | personality traits | Mendelian genetics | Mendelian genetics | genetic mapping techniques | genetic mapping techniques | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | environmental | environmental | genetic programs | genetic programs | evolutionary genetics | evolutionary genetics | social | social | ethical | ethical | 9.19 | 9.19 | 7.66 | 7.66

License

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21W.784 Becoming Digital: Writing about Media Change (MIT) 21W.784 Becoming Digital: Writing about Media Change (MIT)

Description

"Becoming Digital" traces the change in practice, theory and possibility as mechanical and chemical media are augmented or supplanted by digital media. These changes will be grounded in a semester length study of "reports from the front." These reports, found and introduced by students throughout the semester, are the material produced by and about soldiers and civilians on the battlefield from the introduction of wet photography during the Crimean and Civil Wars to contemporary digital content posted daily to Web 2.0 sites from areas such as Iraq and Afghanistan and possibly even the games and simulations they've inspired. Students will work through the ethical, aesthetic, technical and cultural problems raised by the primary content and secondary readings in three pa "Becoming Digital" traces the change in practice, theory and possibility as mechanical and chemical media are augmented or supplanted by digital media. These changes will be grounded in a semester length study of "reports from the front." These reports, found and introduced by students throughout the semester, are the material produced by and about soldiers and civilians on the battlefield from the introduction of wet photography during the Crimean and Civil Wars to contemporary digital content posted daily to Web 2.0 sites from areas such as Iraq and Afghanistan and possibly even the games and simulations they've inspired. Students will work through the ethical, aesthetic, technical and cultural problems raised by the primary content and secondary readings in three pa

Subjects

Writing | Writing | culture | culture | digital | digital | computer | computer | technology | technology | daily lives | daily lives | communicate | communicate | business | business | information | information | entertain | entertain | media | media | values | values | ethical | ethical | aesthetic | aesthetic | images | images | texts | texts | sounds | sounds | people | people | property | property | history | history | identity | identity | movies | movies | games | games | music | music | digital channels | digital channels | content outline | content outline | digital content | digital content | channels | channels | digital media options | digital media options | digital influence | digital influence | digital marketers | digital marketers | digital destinations | digital destinations | behavioral targeting | behavioral targeting | digital marketing | digital marketing | digital platform | digital platform | digital games | digital games | mobile marketing | mobile marketing | smart agents | smart agents | generating awareness. | generating awareness.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT) 21L.005 Introduction to Drama (MIT)

Description

Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances. Drama combines the literary arts of storytelling and poetry with the world of live performance. As a form of ritual as well as entertainment, drama has served to unite communities and challenge social norms, to vitalize and disturb its audiences. In order to understand this rich art form more fully, we will study and discuss a sampling of plays that exemplify different kinds of dramatic structure; class members will also participate in, attend, and review dramatic performances.

Subjects

Drama | Drama | literary arts | literary arts | storytelling | storytelling | poetry | poetry | live performance | live performance | ritual | ritual | entertainment | entertainment | communities | communities | social norms | social norms | audiences | audiences | plays | plays | dramatic structure | dramatic structure | performing arts | performing arts | writing | writing | discussion | discussion | writer | writer | speaker | speaker | cultures | cultures | tools | tools | fiction | fiction | ethical | ethical | historical | historical | political | political | artistic | artistic | questions | questions | creativity | creativity | self-awareness | self-awareness | communicate | communicate | theater. | theater.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Behavioral Genetics (MIT) Behavioral Genetics (MIT)

Description

How genetics can add to our understanding of cognition, language, emotion, personality, and behavior. Use of gene mapping to estimate risk factors for psychological disorders and variation in behavioral and personality traits. Mendelian genetics, genetic mapping techniques, and statistical analysis of large populations and their application to particular studies in behavioral genetics. Topics also include environmental influence on genetic programs, evolutionary genetics, and the larger scientific, social, ethical, and philosophical implications. How genetics can add to our understanding of cognition, language, emotion, personality, and behavior. Use of gene mapping to estimate risk factors for psychological disorders and variation in behavioral and personality traits. Mendelian genetics, genetic mapping techniques, and statistical analysis of large populations and their application to particular studies in behavioral genetics. Topics also include environmental influence on genetic programs, evolutionary genetics, and the larger scientific, social, ethical, and philosophical implications.

Subjects

cognition | cognition | language | language | emotion | emotion | personality | personality | behavior | behavior | gene mapping | gene mapping | personality traits | personality traits | Mendelian genetics | Mendelian genetics | genetic mapping techniques | genetic mapping techniques | statistical analysis | statistical analysis | environmental | environmental | genetic programs | genetic programs | evolutionary genetics | evolutionary genetics | social | social | ethical | ethical | 9.19 | 9.19 | 7.66 | 7.66

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Copyright Copyright

Description

In using copyright works (e.g. journals or newspaper articles, books, photographs, music) for study or research you are expected to observe certain legal and ethical constraints. In particular, you are bound to abide by the law of copyright. This resource helps you to see how copyright could affect the way you study, research and work while at university. This resource is suitable for all levels of study. In using copyright works (e.g. journals or newspaper articles, books, photographs, music) for study or research you are expected to observe certain legal and ethical constraints. In particular, you are bound to abide by the law of copyright. This resource helps you to see how copyright could affect the way you study, research and work while at university. This resource is suitable for all levels of study.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | copyright | copyright | ukoer | ukoer | copyright works | copyright works | legal and ethical constraints | legal and ethical constraints | photocopying books | photocopying books | scanning journals | scanning journals | digitising music | digitising music | right to copy | right to copy | literary protection | literary protection | copyright owner | copyright owner

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the immediate intellectual antecedents and some of the implications of the ideas animating Darwin's revolutionary On the Origin of Species. Darwin's text, of course, is about the mechanism that drives the evolution of life on this planet, but the fundamental ideas of the text have implications that range well beyond the scope of natural history, and the assumptions behind Darwin's arguments challenge ideas that go much further back than the set of ideas that Darwin set himself explicitly to question - ideas of decisive importance when we think about ourselves, the nature of the material universe, the planet that we live upon, and our place in its scheme of

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | artificial | artificial | intelligence | intelligence | feedback | feedback | mechanism | mechanism | speculative | speculative | thought | thought | intelligent | intelligent | agency | agency | systems | systems | design | design | pre-Darwinian | pre-Darwinian | Darwinian | Darwinian | natural | natural | history | history | conscious | conscious | selection | selection | chance | chance | unconscious | unconscious | philosophy | philosophy | human | human | Adam Smith | Adam Smith | Thomas Malthus | Thomas Malthus | intellectual | intellectual | self-guiding | self-guiding | self-sustaining | self-sustaining | nature | nature | unintelligent | unintelligent | mechanical | mechanical | argument | argument | evolution | evolution | creation | creation | creationism | creationism | ethics | ethics | ethical | ethical | values | values | On the Origin of Species | On the Origin of Species | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | model | model | existence | existence | objects | objects | designer | designer | purpose | purpose | literary texts | literary texts | philosophical texts | philosophical texts | Western tradition | Western tradition | intellectual history | intellectual history | life | life | planet | planet | natural history | natural history | material universe | material universe | theory of natural selection | theory of natural selection | argument from design | argument from design | organisms | organisms | human design | human design | conscious agency | conscious agency | unconscious agency | unconscious agency | human intelligence | human intelligence | self-guiding systems | self-guiding systems | self-sustaining systems | self-sustaining systems | natural selection | natural selection | 21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Freedom, knowledge and society: the preconditions of ethical reasoning

Description

Part 2 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". In this episode we examine the preconditions of ethical reasoning and make a comparison between the law of the land and the moral law. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethical | moral law | morals | freewill | philosophy | determinism | ethics | reasoning | ethical | moral law | morals | freewill | philosophy | determinism | ethics | reasoning | 2011-02-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Freedom, knowledge and society: the preconditions of ethical reasoning (Slides)

Description

Part 2 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". In this episode we examine the preconditions of ethical reasoning and make a comparison between the law of the land and the moral law. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

ethical | moral law | morals | freewill | philosophy | determinism | ethics | reasoning | ethical | moral law | morals | freewill | philosophy | determinism | ethics | reasoning | 2011-02-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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