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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Amanulu de Remy of the Haitian Rara band Konbo Guinyn performing in Miami Amanulu de Remy of the Haitian Rara band Konbo Guinyn performing in Miami

Description

Subjects

musicians | musicians | women | women | singing | singing | florida | florida | miami | miami | performingarts | performingarts | hats | hats | singers | singers | womenmusicians | womenmusicians | miamidadecounty | miamidadecounty | personaladornment | personaladornment | domesticarts | domesticarts | artsperforming | artsperforming | musicalintstruments | musicalintstruments | musicaltraditions | musicaltraditions | ethnicityhaitian | ethnicityhaitian | musicaltraditionshaitian | musicaltraditionshaitian | konboguinynmusicalgroup | konboguinynmusicalgroup | deremyamanulu | deremyamanulu | musicaltraditionslatinamericanandcaribbean | musicaltraditionslatinamericanandcaribbean | songshaitian | songshaitian | ethnicitylatinamericanandcaribbean | ethnicitylatinamericanandcaribbean | haitianamericanentertainers | haitianamericanentertainers | saltzmanrikicollector | saltzmanrikicollector | haitianamericanmusicians | haitianamericanmusicians

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT) 21G.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence. An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence.

Subjects

asian immigration | asian immigration | chinese problem | chinese problem | anti-asian movements | anti-asian movements | WWII | WWII | new wave immigration | new wave immigration | racism | racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | Chinatown | Chinatown | panethnicity | panethnicity | memoir | memoir | chinese exlucsion | chinese exlucsion | U.S. imperialism | U.S. imperialism | Philippines | Philippines | japanese-american internment | japanese-american internment | diaspora | diaspora

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Politics of Ethnicity in Ethiopia: Actors, Power and Mobilisation under Ethnic Federalism

Description

Louise Aalen, Bergen University, gives a talk for the African Studies Seminar Series on 2nd February 2012. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Ethiopia | Africa | Governance | ethnicity | politics | Ethiopia | Africa | Governance | ethnicity | politics | 2012-02-02

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Ethnicity, Power and Kinship. Female Chiefs in Tanzania, 1870-1940

Description

Heide Schmidt, Professor of African Studies, University of Vienna, gives a talk for the African Studies Seminar series on 16th May, 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

family | gender | tanzania | Africa | feminism | ethnicity | women | family | gender | tanzania | Africa | feminism | ethnicity | women | 2011-05-16

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The August 2011 Riots: A Political Act

Description

Dr Kathryn Nwajiaku-Dahou (Politics Department, Oxford) gives a talk for the Oxford Symposium on the August 2011 Riots. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

youth | civil disorder | riots | young people | politics | education | ethnicity | youth | civil disorder | riots | young people | politics | education | ethnicity | 2010-10-15

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Issue of Contemporary Education Policies and their impact on black youth

Description

Professor Gus John gives a talk for the Oxford Symposium on the August Riots. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

youth | civil disorder | riots | young people | education | ethnicity | youth | civil disorder | riots | young people | education | ethnicity | 2011-10-14

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Issue of Contemporary Education Policies and their impact on black youth

Description

Professor Gus John gives a talk for the Oxford Symposium on the August Riots. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

youth | civil disorder | riots | young people | education | ethnicity | youth | civil disorder | riots | young people | education | ethnicity | 2011-10-14

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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in the UK?

Description

Podcast on what migration means for 'White Working Class' in the UK, Ben Rogaly and Becky Taylor present their research findings. Politicians from a wide variety of political perspectives have invoked 'the white working class' in immigration debates, while evidence shows that many who fit this category are now out-performed on many indices of deprivation and educational attainment by ethnic minorities from migrant backgrounds. But what is the actual evidence for the impact of migration on "white working class" communities? What are the policy implications of the evidence? And how helpful are the terms of the debate in the first place? This briefing will be presented by Dr Ben Rogaly, Senior Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Sussex and a member of the Sussex Centre for Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

migrants | human geography | migration | identity | politics | working class | class | ethnicity | migrants | human geography | migration | identity | politics | working class | class | ethnicity | 2011-04-01

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights. An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | language | language | sexuality | sexuality | feminist analysis | feminist analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT) SP.401 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family. This course offers an introduction to Women's and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that asks critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women's and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, work, medicine and the family.

Subjects

women's studies | women's studies | gender | gender | transsexual | transsexual | women's movement | women's movement | women's rights | women's rights | declaration of independence | declaration of independence | madness | madness | illness | illness | patriarchy | patriarchy | female pathology | female pathology | socialization | socialization | ethnicity | ethnicity | race | race | gender roles | gender roles | social construction | social construction | biological essentialism | biological essentialism | embodiment | embodiment | body image | body image | representation of women | representation of women | sexuality | sexuality | reproductive politics | reproductive politics | work | work | violence | violence | feminism | feminism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Historical Experience (MIT) Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in US society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the nineteenth century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-As

Subjects

literature | literature | history | history | anthropology | anthropology | film | film | cultural studies | cultural studies | Asian Americans | Asian Americans | anti-Asian movements | anti-Asian movements | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian Americans during WWII | Asian American movement | Asian American movement | Asian immigration | Asian immigration | ethnicity | ethnicity | racial stereotyping | racial stereotyping | media racism | media racism | affirmative action | affirmative action | glass ceiling | glass ceiling | "model minority" syndrome | "model minority" syndrome | harassment | harassment | violence | violence | 21F.043J | 21F.043J | 21H.150 | 21H.150 | 21F.043 | 21F.043

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | culture studies | culture studies | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | gender identity | gender identity | religious identity | religious identity | racial identity | racial identity | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social movements | social movements | identity politics | identity politics | indigenous rights movements | indigenous rights movements | transnational institutions | transnational institutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT) 17.581 Riots, Rebellions, Revolutions (MIT)

Description

This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed. This course examines different types of violent political conflict. It compares and contrasts several social science approaches (psychological, sociological, and political) and analyzes their ability to explain variation in outbreak, duration and outcome of conflict. Incidents such as riots in the U.S. during the 1960's, riots in India, the Yugoslav wars, and the Russian Revolution, as well as current international events are discussed.

Subjects

social action | social action | rational choice | rational choice | riots | riots | rebellions | rebellions | revolutions | revolutions | rationality | rationality | j-curve | j-curve | Southeast Asia | Southeast Asia | peasant movement | peasant movement | Vietnam | Vietnam | politics | politics | insurgency | insurgency | civil war | civil war | ethnicity | ethnicity | race riot | race riot | urban riot | urban riot | Rodney King | Rodney King | relative deprivation | relative deprivation | Spilerman | Spilerman | racial disturbances | racial disturbances | protest | protest | nationalist violence | nationalist violence | USSR | USSR | Balkans | Balkans | ethnic polarization | ethnic polarization | Kosovo | Kosovo | Arab Spring | Arab Spring | Mali | Mali

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.922 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. IAP Design Seminar (MIT) 17.922 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. IAP Design Seminar (MIT)

Description

This seminar facilitates the design and construction of installations and other community projects in conjunction with and beyond MIT's celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. During the first half of the class, MIT and Wellesley students develop in-depth understanding of the history of US racial issues as well as past and present domestic and international political struggles. In the second half, the students work as a group to complete the installations and projects which serve as models for connecting academics with real life problems and struggle.This seminar is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month. This seminar facilitates the design and construction of installations and other community projects in conjunction with and beyond MIT's celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. During the first half of the class, MIT and Wellesley students develop in-depth understanding of the history of US racial issues as well as past and present domestic and international political struggles. In the second half, the students work as a group to complete the installations and projects which serve as models for connecting academics with real life problems and struggle.This seminar is offered during the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the end of the month.

Subjects

Martin Luther King | Martin Luther King | memorial | memorial | civil rights | civil rights | design | design | race | race | ethnicity | ethnicity | gender | gender | sex | sex | class | class | Lydia Cacho | Lydia Cacho | Nelson Mandela | Nelson Mandela | Malcolm X | Malcolm X | art | art | installation | installation | human rights | human rights | identity | identity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.523 Ethnicity and Race in World Politics (MIT) 17.523 Ethnicity and Race in World Politics (MIT)

Description

Discerning the ethnic and racial dimensions of politics is considered by some indispensable to understanding contemporary world politics. This course seeks to answer fundamental questions about racial and ethnic politics. To begin, what are the bases of ethnic and racial identities? What accounts for political mobilization based upon such identities? What are the political claims and goals of such mobilization and is conflict between groups and/or with government forces inevitable? How do ethnic and racial identities intersect with other identities, such as gender and class, which are themselves the sources of social, political, and economic cleavages? Finally, how are domestic ethnic/racial politics connected to international human rights? To answer these questions, the course begins with Discerning the ethnic and racial dimensions of politics is considered by some indispensable to understanding contemporary world politics. This course seeks to answer fundamental questions about racial and ethnic politics. To begin, what are the bases of ethnic and racial identities? What accounts for political mobilization based upon such identities? What are the political claims and goals of such mobilization and is conflict between groups and/or with government forces inevitable? How do ethnic and racial identities intersect with other identities, such as gender and class, which are themselves the sources of social, political, and economic cleavages? Finally, how are domestic ethnic/racial politics connected to international human rights? To answer these questions, the course begins with

Subjects

ethnic | ethnic | ethnicity | ethnicity | race | race | politics | politics | racial | racial | racial politics | racial politics | ethnic politics | ethnic politics | mobilization | mobilization | identities | identities | gender | gender | class | class | economic | economic | international human rights | international human rights | human rights | human rights | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | africa | africa | asia | asia | latin america | latin america | europe | europe | united states | united states | darfur | darfur | sudan | sudan | bosnia | bosnia | rwanda | rwanda | sovereignty | sovereignty

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.504 Ethnic Politics I (MIT) 17.504 Ethnic Politics I (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the major theories on the relationship between ethnicity and politics. The course is divided into three sections. The first covers general theory and discusses the social construction of ethnicity as well as the limits of construction. The second section discusses ethnicity as a dependent variable. This section studies the forces that shape the development of ethnic identities and their motivating power. The third section addresses ethnicity as an independent variable. In other words, it focuses on how ethnicity operates to affect important political and economic outcomes. This course is the first semester of a year-long sequence on ethnic politics. However, each semester is self-contained and students may take the course This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the major theories on the relationship between ethnicity and politics. The course is divided into three sections. The first covers general theory and discusses the social construction of ethnicity as well as the limits of construction. The second section discusses ethnicity as a dependent variable. This section studies the forces that shape the development of ethnic identities and their motivating power. The third section addresses ethnicity as an independent variable. In other words, it focuses on how ethnicity operates to affect important political and economic outcomes. This course is the first semester of a year-long sequence on ethnic politics. However, each semester is self-contained and students may take the course

Subjects

Political Science | Political Science | ethinic | ethinic | politics | politics | theories | theories | ethnicity | ethnicity | dependent variable | dependent variable | ethnic identities | ethnic identities | motivating power | motivating power | independent variable | independent variable | political | political | economic | economic | outcomes | outcomes | Graduate students | Graduate students

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.042 Citizenship and Pluralism (MIT) 17.042 Citizenship and Pluralism (MIT)

Description

This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: Do This course will serve as both an introduction to contemporary political philosophy and a way to explore issues of pluralism and multiculturalism. Racial and ethnic groups, national minorities, aboriginals, women, sexual minorities, and other groups have organized to highlight injustice and demand recognition and accommodation on the basis of their differences. In practice, democratic states have granted a variety of group-differentiated rights, such as exemptions from generally applicable laws, special representation rights, language rights, or limited self-government rights, to different types of groups. This course will examine how different theories of citizenship address the challenges raised by different forms of pluralism. We will focus in particular on the following questions: Do

Subjects

citizenship | citizenship | ethnicity | ethnicity | identity | identity | democracy | democracy | nations | nations | politics | politics | class differentiation | class differentiation | pluralism | pluralism | national unity | national unity | contemporary | contemporary | political | political | philosophy | philosophy | multiculturalism | multiculturalism | racial | racial | ethnic | ethnic | groups | groups | national | national | minorities | minorities | aboriginals | aboriginals | women | women | sexual | sexual | injustice | injustice | recognition | recognition | accommodation | accommodation | democratic | democratic | states | states | group-differentiated | group-differentiated | rights | rights | exemptions | exemptions | laws | laws | representation | representation | language | language | limited | limited | self-government | self-government | theories | theories | justice | justice | conflict | conflict | liberalequality | liberalequality | citizens | citizens | multi-religious | multi-religious | multicultural | multicultural | society | society | diversity | diversity | communitarian | communitarian | civic | civic | republican | republican | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan | pluralist | pluralist | radical | radical | postmodern | postmodern | American | American | gender | gender | class | class | differentiation | differentiation | liberal | liberal | equality | equality | unity | unity

License

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights. An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights.

Subjects

ethnicity | ethnicity | culture | culture | race | race | oppression | oppression | social structures | social structures | transnationalism | transnationalism | globalization | globalization | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict

License

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21A.218J Identity and Difference (MIT) 21A.218J Identity and Difference (MIT)

Description

This course explores how identities, whether of individuals or groups, are produced, maintained, and transformed. Students will be introduced to various theoretical perspectives that deal with identity formation, including constructions of "the normal." We will explore the utility of these perspectives for understanding identity components such as gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, language, social class, and bodily difference. By semester's end students will understand better how an individual can be at once cause and consequence of society, a unique agent of social action as well as a social product. This course explores how identities, whether of individuals or groups, are produced, maintained, and transformed. Students will be introduced to various theoretical perspectives that deal with identity formation, including constructions of "the normal." We will explore the utility of these perspectives for understanding identity components such as gender, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, language, social class, and bodily difference. By semester's end students will understand better how an individual can be at once cause and consequence of society, a unique agent of social action as well as a social product.

Subjects

21A.218 | 21A.218 | WGS.170 | WGS.170 | class | class | social interaction | social interaction | discourse | discourse | performance | performance | bodies | bodies | conformity | conformity | deviance | deviance | gender | gender | biology | biology | culture | culture | race | race | constructivism | constructivism | essentialism | essentialism | structuralism | structuralism | incarceration | incarceration | religion | religion | food | food | group membership | group membership | sexuality | sexuality | ethnicity | ethnicity | institution | institution | identity formation | identity formation | stigma | stigma

License

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21A.230J The Contemporary American Family (MIT) 21A.230J The Contemporary American Family (MIT)

Description

We begin by considering briefly the evolution of the family, its cross-cultural variability, and its history in the West. We next examine how the family is currently defined in the U.S., discussing different views about what families should look like. Class and ethnic variability and the effects of changing gender roles are discussed in this section. We next look at sexuality, traditional and non-traditional marriage, parenting, divorce, family violence, family economics, poverty, and family policy. Controversial issues dealt with include day care, welfare policy, and the "Family Values" debate. We begin by considering briefly the evolution of the family, its cross-cultural variability, and its history in the West. We next examine how the family is currently defined in the U.S., discussing different views about what families should look like. Class and ethnic variability and the effects of changing gender roles are discussed in this section. We next look at sexuality, traditional and non-traditional marriage, parenting, divorce, family violence, family economics, poverty, and family policy. Controversial issues dealt with include day care, welfare policy, and the "Family Values" debate.

Subjects

21A.230 | 21A.230 | WGS.456 | WGS.456 | ameican family | ameican family | anthropology | anthropology | contemporary culture | contemporary culture | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | united states | united states | class | class | ethnicity | ethnicity | gender | gender | sexuality | sexuality | marriage | marriage | parenting | parenting | divorce | divorce | violence | violence | economics | economics | poverty | poverty | policy | policy | values | values | welfare | welfare | day care | day care | SP.456J | SP.456J | WMN.456J | WMN.456J | SP.456 | SP.456 | WMN.456 | WMN.456

License

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21F.043J Introduction to Asian American Studies: Literature, Culture, and Historical Experience (MIT)

Description

An interdisciplinary subject that draws on literature, history, anthropology, film, and cultural studies to examine the experiences of Asian Americans in U.S. society. Covers the first wave of Asian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Americans during WWII, the emergence of the Asian American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave of "post-1965" Asian immigration. Examines the role these historical experiences played in the formation of Asian American ethnicity, and explores how these experiences informed Asian American literature and culture. Addresses key societal issues such as racial stereotyping, media racism, affirmative action issues, the glass ceiling, the "model minority" syndrome, and anti-Asian harassment or violence.

Subjects

asian immigration | chinese problem | anti-asian movements | WWII | new wave immigration | racism | affirmative action | race | ethnicity | Chinatown | panethnicity | memoir | chinese exlucsion | U.S. imperialism | Philippines | japanese-american internment | diaspora

License

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21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT) 21H.221 The Places of Migration in United States History (MIT)

Description

This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City. This course examines the history of the United States as a "nation of immigrants" within a broader global context. It considers migration from the mid-19th century to the present through case studies of such places as New York's Lower East Side, South Texas, Florida, and San Francisco's Chinatown. It also examines the role of memory, media, and popular culture in shaping ideas about migration. The course includes optional field trip to New York City.

Subjects

immigration | immigration | migration | migration | lawrence | lawrence | chinatown | chinatown | U.S.-Mexico border | U.S.-Mexico border | Great Migration | Great Migration | The Jazz Singer | The Jazz Singer | Lower East Side | Lower East Side | ethnicity | ethnicity | New York City | New York City | New Immigration | New Immigration | Filipino | Filipino | american imperialism | american imperialism | cuban-american | cuban-american | multiculturalism | multiculturalism | caribbean migration | caribbean migration | asian immigration | asian immigration

License

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