Searching for eugenics : 15 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT) STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page. This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page.

Subjects

technology; | technology; | technology | technology | society | society | modern | modern | seventeenth century | seventeenth century | present | present | discovery | discovery | progress | progress | history | history | physics | physics | chemistry | chemistry | biology | biology | genetics | genetics | geology | geology | medicine | medicine | psychology | psychology | computer science | computer science | race | race | ethics | ethics | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | warfare | warfare | evolution | evolution | Freud | Freud | Einstein | Einstein | Darwin | Darwin | experiment | experiment | eugenics | eugenics | technology and society | technology and society | policy | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.06J Bioethics (MIT) 24.06J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers. This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

Subjects

24.06 | 24.06 | STS.006 | STS.006 | medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | life support | life support | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | enhancing or cheating | enhancing or cheating | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.892 Classification, Natural Kinds, and Conceptual Change: Race as a Case Study (MIT) 24.892 Classification, Natural Kinds, and Conceptual Change: Race as a Case Study (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the claim that there is no such thing as race, with a particular emphasis on the question whether races should be thought of as natural kinds: is our concept of race a natural kind concept? Is the term 'race' a natural kind term? If so, is Appiah right to conclude that there are no races? How should one go about "analyzing" the concept of race? This course will consider the claim that there is no such thing as race, with a particular emphasis on the question whether races should be thought of as natural kinds: is our concept of race a natural kind concept? Is the term 'race' a natural kind term? If so, is Appiah right to conclude that there are no races? How should one go about "analyzing" the concept of race?

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | race | race | natural kinds | natural kinds | classification | classification | Appiah | Appiah | naming | naming | genomics | genomics | marriage | marriage | intermarriage | intermarriage | history of science | history of science | DNA | DNA | eugenics | eugenics | biology | biology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.006J Bioethics (MIT) STS.006J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai

Subjects

medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.240 Race and Science (MIT) 21A.240 Race and Science (MIT)

Description

This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene

Subjects

race | race | eugenics | eugenics | scientific racism | scientific racism | racial hygiene | racial hygiene | racial economy | racial economy | human biodiversity | human biodiversity | apartheid | apartheid | race and gender | race and gender | monogenist | monogenist | polygenist | polygenist | alchemy of race | alchemy of race | nazi medicine | nazi medicine | nazi racism | nazi racism | sociology of science | sociology of science | race and culture | race and culture | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | raciology. | raciology.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.355J The Anthropology of Biology (MIT) 21A.355J The Anthropology of Biology (MIT)

Description

If the twentieth century was the century of physics, the twenty-first promises to be the century of biology. This subject examines the cultural, political, and economic dimensions of biology in the age of genomics, biotechnological enterprise, biodiversity conservation, pharmaceutical bioprospecting, and synthetic biology. Although we examine such social concerns as bioterrorism, genetic modification, and cloning, this is not a class in bioethics, but rather an anthropological inquiry into how the substances and explanations of biology — increasingly cellular, molecular, genetic, and informatic — are changing, and with them broader ideas about the relationship between "nature" and "culture." Looking at such cultural artifacts as cell lines, biodiversity databases, and artif If the twentieth century was the century of physics, the twenty-first promises to be the century of biology. This subject examines the cultural, political, and economic dimensions of biology in the age of genomics, biotechnological enterprise, biodiversity conservation, pharmaceutical bioprospecting, and synthetic biology. Although we examine such social concerns as bioterrorism, genetic modification, and cloning, this is not a class in bioethics, but rather an anthropological inquiry into how the substances and explanations of biology — increasingly cellular, molecular, genetic, and informatic — are changing, and with them broader ideas about the relationship between "nature" and "culture." Looking at such cultural artifacts as cell lines, biodiversity databases, and artif

Subjects

synthetic biology | synthetic biology | genetics | genetics | Charles Darwin | Charles Darwin | evolution | evolution | eugenics | eugenics | bioprospecting | bioprospecting | ethics | ethics | biodiversity | biodiversity | race | race | molecular biology | molecular biology | sociology of science | sociology of science | construction of identity | construction of identity | intersex | intersex | biotechnology | biotechnology | narratives and metaphors | narratives and metaphors

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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UCL Galton Collection Teaching Pack

Description

The Victorian scientist Sir Francis Galton (1822-1911) bequeathed a collection of objects to University College London on his death in 1911. These objects, which include Galton’s personal affects, custom-made objects used in his research and objects from the Galton Laboratory now compose the UCL Galton Collection. This resource has been compiled to showcase some of the objects in this collection and to list the subjects represented, which could be used in teaching. This resource has been created as part of the JISC funded project Object Based Learning for Higher Education (OBL4HE) - a project to create a range of online educational resources for university teachers and students based around the use of museum collections and archival material for enhancing learning. To search for more of

Subjects

Galton | biostatistics | human genetics | meteorology | anthropometrics | eugenics | craniometer | death masks | phrenology | quincunx | criminology | crime science | museum | OBL4HE

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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24.06J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

Subjects

24.06 | STS.006 | medical ethics | ethics | genetics | life support | stem cell | GM | genetically modified | genetic engineering | risk | biomedical | medicine | cloning | euthanasia | enhancing or cheating | abortion | eugenics | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ donor | disease | public health | health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This course studies the development of modern science from the seventeenth century to the present, focusing on Europe and the United States. Key questions include: What is science, and how is it done? How are discoveries made and accepted? What is the nature of scientific progress? What is the impact of science on society? What is the impact of society on science? Topics will be drawn from the histories of physics, chemistry, biology, psychology, and medicine.AcknowledgementThis class is based on the one originally designed and taught by Prof. David Jones. His Spring 2005 version can be viewed by following the link under Archived Courses on the right side of this page.

Subjects

technology; | technology | society | modern | seventeenth century | present | discovery | progress | history | physics | chemistry | biology | genetics | geology | medicine | psychology | computer science | race | ethics | scientific revolution | warfare | evolution | Freud | Einstein | Darwin | experiment | eugenics | technology and society | policy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.355J The Anthropology of Biology (MIT)

Description

If the twentieth century was the century of physics, the twenty-first promises to be the century of biology. This subject examines the cultural, political, and economic dimensions of biology in the age of genomics, biotechnological enterprise, biodiversity conservation, pharmaceutical bioprospecting, and synthetic biology. Although we examine such social concerns as bioterrorism, genetic modification, and cloning, this is not a class in bioethics, but rather an anthropological inquiry into how the substances and explanations of biology — increasingly cellular, molecular, genetic, and informatic — are changing, and with them broader ideas about the relationship between "nature" and "culture." Looking at such cultural artifacts as cell lines, biodiversity databases, and artif

Subjects

synthetic biology | genetics | Charles Darwin | evolution | eugenics | bioprospecting | ethics | biodiversity | race | molecular biology | sociology of science | construction of identity | intersex | biotechnology | narratives and metaphors

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.355J The Anthropology of Biology (MIT)

Description

If the twentieth century was the century of physics, the twenty-first promises to be the century of biology. This subject examines the cultural, political, and economic dimensions of biology in the age of genomics, biotechnological enterprise, biodiversity conservation, pharmaceutical bioprospecting, and synthetic biology. Although we examine such social concerns as bioterrorism, genetic modification, and cloning, this is not a class in bioethics, but rather an anthropological inquiry into how the substances and explanations of biology — increasingly cellular, molecular, genetic, and informatic — are changing, and with them broader ideas about the relationship between "nature" and "culture." Looking at such cultural artifacts as cell lines, biodiversity databases, and artif

Subjects

synthetic biology | genetics | Charles Darwin | evolution | eugenics | bioprospecting | ethics | biodiversity | race | molecular biology | sociology of science | construction of identity | intersex | biotechnology | narratives and metaphors

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.240 Race and Science (MIT)

Description

This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene

Subjects

race | eugenics | scientific racism | racial hygiene | racial economy | human biodiversity | apartheid | race and gender | monogenist | polygenist | alchemy of race | nazi medicine | nazi racism | sociology of science | race and culture | genetic engineering | raciology.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.892 Classification, Natural Kinds, and Conceptual Change: Race as a Case Study (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the claim that there is no such thing as race, with a particular emphasis on the question whether races should be thought of as natural kinds: is our concept of race a natural kind concept? Is the term 'race' a natural kind term? If so, is Appiah right to conclude that there are no races? How should one go about "analyzing" the concept of race?

Subjects

Philosophy | race | natural kinds | classification | Appiah | naming | genomics | marriage | intermarriage | history of science | DNA | eugenics | biology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Eugenics in the Irish Free State 1922-1939

Description

rural housing on the West coast. This scheme also provided healthcare and improved sanitation. ? This type of eugenics was about building a strong nation (rather than race or class) and was a response to modernisation and the threat to rural living.

Subjects

health | legislation | Ireland | church | eugenics

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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STS.006J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai

Subjects

medical ethics | ethics | genetics | stem cell | GM | genetically modified | genetic engineering | risk | biomedical | medicine | cloning | euthanasia | abortion | eugenics | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ donor | disease | public health | health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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