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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT) 8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m 8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC) | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.436J Fundamentals of Probability (MIT) 6.436J Fundamentals of Probability (MIT)

Description

This is a course on the fundamentals of probability geared towards first- or second-year graduate students who are interested in a rigorous development of the subject. The course covers most of the topics in 6.431 (sample space, random variables, expectations, transforms, Bernoulli and Poisson processes, finite Markov chains, limit theorems) but at a faster pace and in more depth. There are also a number of additional topics, such as language, terminology, and key results from measure theory; interchange of limits and expectations; multivariate Gaussian distributions; deeper understanding of conditional distributions and expectations. This is a course on the fundamentals of probability geared towards first- or second-year graduate students who are interested in a rigorous development of the subject. The course covers most of the topics in 6.431 (sample space, random variables, expectations, transforms, Bernoulli and Poisson processes, finite Markov chains, limit theorems) but at a faster pace and in more depth. There are also a number of additional topics, such as language, terminology, and key results from measure theory; interchange of limits and expectations; multivariate Gaussian distributions; deeper understanding of conditional distributions and expectations.

Subjects

sample space | sample space | random variables | random variables | expectations | expectations | transforms | transforms | Bernoulli process | Bernoulli process | Poisson process | Poisson process | Markov chains | Markov chains | limit theorems | limit theorems | measure theory | measure theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT) 8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments.  Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, 8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments.  Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories,

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC) | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Governments and politics of the USA Governments and politics of the USA

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This is a self-contained study of the institutions and processes of the government and politics of the United States. It explores the concepts of limited government, constitutionalism and checks and balances, and the way in which they operate in the American political system. It examines how American governments seek to make policy, the extent to which they can make an impact on society and the different types of constraints on their actions. It also looks at democracy in the American context, how citizens attempt to influence the activities of government and their expectations and beliefs about what is the appropriate role of government. Module Code: M12019 Suit This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. This is a self-contained study of the institutions and processes of the government and politics of the United States. It explores the concepts of limited government, constitutionalism and checks and balances, and the way in which they operate in the American political system. It examines how American governments seek to make policy, the extent to which they can make an impact on society and the different types of constraints on their actions. It also looks at democracy in the American context, how citizens attempt to influence the activities of government and their expectations and beliefs about what is the appropriate role of government. Module Code: M12019 Suit

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukeor | ukeor | module code M12019 | module code M12019 | of the United States | of the United States | politics and international relations | politics and international relations | concepts of limited government | concepts of limited government | constitutionalism | constitutionalism | checks and balances | checks and balances | American political system | American political system | expectations of government | expectations of government | USA political policy | USA political policy | UKOER | UKOER

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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16.A47 The Engineer of 2020 (MIT) 16.A47 The Engineer of 2020 (MIT)

Description

Numerous recent studies have shown that the U.S. has relatively low percentages of students who enter science and engineering and a high drop-out rate. Some other countries are producing many more scientists and engineers per capita than the U.S. What does this mean for the future of the U.S. and the global economy? In this readings and discussion-based seminar you will meet weekly with the Dean of Undergraduate Education to explore the kind of education MIT and other institutions are and should be giving. Based on data from National Academy and other reports, along with what pundits have been saying, we'll see if we can decide how much the U.S. may or may not be at risk. Numerous recent studies have shown that the U.S. has relatively low percentages of students who enter science and engineering and a high drop-out rate. Some other countries are producing many more scientists and engineers per capita than the U.S. What does this mean for the future of the U.S. and the global economy? In this readings and discussion-based seminar you will meet weekly with the Dean of Undergraduate Education to explore the kind of education MIT and other institutions are and should be giving. Based on data from National Academy and other reports, along with what pundits have been saying, we'll see if we can decide how much the U.S. may or may not be at risk.

Subjects

engineering education | engineering education | curricula development | curricula development | admission trends | admission trends | student expectations | student expectations | modern engineers | modern engineers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments.  Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories,

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Money and Banking / Financial Economics

Description

This course is designed to provide a thorough understanding of the importance of money, banking, and financial markets of a developed economy. Money, financial institutions, and financial markets have emerged as instruments of payments for the services of factors of production, such as labor and capital. The use of money facilitates business in a market by acting as a common medium of exchange. Of course, as that market expands and develops on a national and international level, the importance of money, banking, and other financial markets expands to accommodate innumerable exchanges. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Economics 302)

Subjects

money | banking | financial | markets | monetary policy | theory of rational expectations | efficient market hypothesis | non-bank finance | multiple deposit creation | international financial system | monetary theory | keynesian framework | islm model | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Audio interview with a Masters student

Description

Interview (6 min) about the experience of studying on a distance learning course at Brookes, the Masters of Children, Young People and Family Wellbeing, which (from 2016 onwards) will be called 'Child Welfare and Wellbeing'. The interview is conducted over the phone. Tutor and student are located 200 miles apart. The student was on her landline while the tutor used her laptop, skype and an audio recording software package.

Subjects

ukoer distance learning interview student experience part-time flexible expectations internet online community virtual learning environment VLE

License

copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License. copyright Oxford Brookes University, except where indicated in the item description. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales License.

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DF5434 Understanding and Supporting Children's Behaviour

Description

This unit is designed to enable the student to gain an understanding of the reasons why young children behave the way they do and the factors that influence this behaviour. This unit will also enable you to explore strategies to use in the support of a range of behaviours, with consideration of the additional support needs for more challenging behaviour. Outcomes: 1.Identify and explain factors that influence children's behaviour. 2.Analyse and evaluate a range of strategies in the support of positive behaviour. 3.Investigate causes for concern and additional support needs. 4.Demonstrate an awareness of the roles of other professionals and the strategies they use in the support of positive behaviour in children with additional support needs.

Subjects

DF54 34 | DF5434 | learning theory | influencing behaviour | additional support needs | cultural expectations | positive behaviour | childcare | P: Health Care/Medicine/Health and Safety | SAFETY | SCQF Level 7

License

Copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG). None of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG). None of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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DF5434 Understanding and Supporting Children's Behaviour

Description

This unit is designed to enable the student to gain an understanding of the reasons why young children behave the way they do and the factors that influence this behaviour. This unit will also enable you to explore strategies to use in the support of a range of behaviours, with consideration of the additional support needs for more challenging behaviour. Outcomes: 1.Identify and explain factors that influence children's behaviour. 2.Analyse and evaluate a range of strategies in the support of positive behaviour. 3.Investigate causes for concern and additional support needs. 4.Demonstrate an awareness of the roles of other professionals and the strategies they use in the support of positive behaviour in children with additional support needs.

Subjects

DF54 34 | DF5434 | learning theory | influencing behaviour | additional support needs | cultural expectations | positive behaviour | childcare | P: Health Care/Medicine/Health and Safety | SAFETY | SCQF Level 7

License

Copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG). None of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Copyright in these materials is owned by the Colleges Open Learning Exchange Group (COLEG). None of these materials may be Used without the express, prior, written consent of COLEG, except if and to the extent that such Use is permitted under COLEG's conditions of Contribution and Use of Learning Materials through COLEG’s Repository, for the purposes of which these materials are COLEG Materials. Licensed to colleges in Scotland only Licensed to colleges in Scotland only http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 http://content.resourceshare.ac.uk/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10949/17759/LicenceCOLEG.pdf?sequence=1 COLEG COLEG

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.436J Fundamentals of Probability (MIT)

Description

This is a course on the fundamentals of probability geared towards first- or second-year graduate students who are interested in a rigorous development of the subject. The course covers most of the topics in 6.431 (sample space, random variables, expectations, transforms, Bernoulli and Poisson processes, finite Markov chains, limit theorems) but at a faster pace and in more depth. There are also a number of additional topics, such as language, terminology, and key results from measure theory; interchange of limits and expectations; multivariate Gaussian distributions; deeper understanding of conditional distributions and expectations.

Subjects

sample space | random variables | expectations | transforms | Bernoulli process | Poisson process | Markov chains | limit theorems | measure theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.A47 The Engineer of 2020 (MIT)

Description

Numerous recent studies have shown that the U.S. has relatively low percentages of students who enter science and engineering and a high drop-out rate. Some other countries are producing many more scientists and engineers per capita than the U.S. What does this mean for the future of the U.S. and the global economy? In this readings and discussion-based seminar you will meet weekly with the Dean of Undergraduate Education to explore the kind of education MIT and other institutions are and should be giving. Based on data from National Academy and other reports, along with what pundits have been saying, we'll see if we can decide how much the U.S. may or may not be at risk.

Subjects

engineering education | curricula development | admission trends | student expectations | modern engineers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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RES.21G-001 The User-friendly Classroom (MIT)

Description

The User-friendly Classroom video training series was created specifically for teaching assistants for whom English is a second language and the USA a second culture by A.C. Kemp, a lecturer in MIT Global Studies and Languages (GSL).  These videos focus on developing international teaching assistants' strategies for successful, student-centered communication in the interactive American classroom. These videos demonstrate best practices through authentic examples of successful teaching scenarios, interviews with undergraduates and advice from international teaching assistants.These videos were created for use with the following courses: 21G.232 / 21G.233 Advanced Speaking and Critical Listening (ELS)21G.217 / 21G.218 Workshop in Strategies for Effective Teaching (ELS)"Special th

Subjects

international teaching assistants | education | students | user-friendly | phase diagram | aerodynamics | plane | expectations | first day

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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