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6.780 Semiconductor Manufacturing (MIT) 6.780 Semiconductor Manufacturing (MIT)

Description

6.780 covers statistical modeling and the control of semiconductor fabrication processes and plants. Topics covered include: design of experiments, response surface modeling, and process optimization; defect and parametric yield modeling; process/device/circuit yield optimization; monitoring, diagnosis, and feedback control of equipment and processes; and analysis and scheduling of semiconductor manufacturing operations. 6.780 covers statistical modeling and the control of semiconductor fabrication processes and plants. Topics covered include: design of experiments, response surface modeling, and process optimization; defect and parametric yield modeling; process/device/circuit yield optimization; monitoring, diagnosis, and feedback control of equipment and processes; and analysis and scheduling of semiconductor manufacturing operations.

Subjects

Semiconductor manufacturing | Semiconductor manufacturing | statistics | statistics | distributions | distributions | estimation | estimation | hypothesis testing | hypothesis testing | statistical process control | statistical process control | control chart | control chart | control chart design | control chart design | design of experiments | design of experiments | empirical equipment | empirical equipment | process modeling | process modeling | experimental design | experimental design | yield models | yield models | spatial variation | spatial variation | spatial models | spatial models | design for manufacturability | design for manufacturability | equipment monitoring | equipment monitoring | equipment diagnosis | equipment diagnosis | equipment control | equipment control | run by run | run by run | multistage process control | multistage process control | scheduling | scheduling | planning | planning | factory modeling | factory modeling | factory infrastructure | factory infrastructure | environmental | environmental | health and safety | health and safety | computer integrated manufacturing | computer integrated manufacturing | factory operation | factory operation | factory design | factory design | advanced process control | advanced process control | yield learning | yield learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Naval Aircraft Factory PT-1 Naval Aircraft Factory PT-1

Description

Subjects

airplane | airplane | aircraft | aircraft | aviation | aviation | pt | pt | usnavy | usnavy | usn | usn | naf | naf | biplane | biplane | militaryaviation | militaryaviation | pt1 | pt1 | navalaviation | navalaviation | unitedstatesnavy | unitedstatesnavy | navalaircraftfactory | navalaircraftfactory | a6044 | a6044 | liberty12 | liberty12 | libertyengine | libertyengine | libertyl12 | libertyl12 | navalaircraftfactorypt | navalaircraftfactorypt | navalaircraftfactorypt1 | navalaircraftfactorypt1 | nafpt | nafpt | nafpt1 | nafpt1 | bunoa6044 | bunoa6044

License

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Wills Tobacco Factory, Newcastle upon Tyne, 1950

Description

Aerial view of the Wills cigarette factory, built for W.D. & H.O. Wills, the British cigarette manufacturer, March 1950 (TWAM ref. DT.TUR/2/4448G). The factory closed in 1986 and was redeveloped in the late 1990s as apartments. It's now known as the Wills Building and is located on the Coast Road between Newcastle upon Tyne and North Shields. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share this digital image within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk. To purchase a hi-res copy please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk quoting the title and reference number.

Subjects

newcastleupontyne | aerialviews | aerialphotographs | willsbuilding | willstobaccofactory | coastroad | tobacco | cigarettes | railwayline | vauxbeers | advertising | industrialheritage | industry | northeastofengland | land | unitedkingdom | blackandwhitephotograph | digitalimage | archives | aerialphotograph | consumerism | economy | willscigarettefactory | factory | production | buildings | road | bridge | vehicle | transportation | row | vegetation | wall | roof | window | doorway | entrance | tunnel | shadow | daylight | pole | blur | grain | debris | slope | soil | rail | manufacturing | britishcigarettemanufacturer | wdhowills | construction | structure | signage | board | letters | march1950 | closure | 1986 | redevelopment | late1990s | apartments | northshields | eastcoastmainline | late1940s | cigarettefactory | kentonwaggonway | gosforthwaggonway | drugs | consumer | product | mark | trail | print

License

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Factory building with high chimney Factory building with high chimney

Description

Subjects

ireland | ireland | chimney | chimney | 1930s | 1930s | factory | factory | alcohol | alcohol | dillon | dillon | distillery | distillery | ulster | ulster | toughie | toughie | ethanol | ethanol | codonegal | codonegal | thomasmayne | thomasmayne | carndonagh | carndonagh | lanternslides | lanternslides | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | alcoholfactory | alcoholfactory | lemass | lemass | thomasholmesmason | thomasholmesmason | thomashmasonsonslimited | thomashmasonsonslimited | economicwar1930s | economicwar1930s | freestategovernment | freestategovernment | jandiederikpostma | jandiederikpostma

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6.780 Semiconductor Manufacturing (MIT)

Description

6.780 covers statistical modeling and the control of semiconductor fabrication processes and plants. Topics covered include: design of experiments, response surface modeling, and process optimization; defect and parametric yield modeling; process/device/circuit yield optimization; monitoring, diagnosis, and feedback control of equipment and processes; and analysis and scheduling of semiconductor manufacturing operations.

Subjects

Semiconductor manufacturing | statistics | distributions | estimation | hypothesis testing | statistical process control | control chart | control chart design | design of experiments | empirical equipment | process modeling | experimental design | yield models | spatial variation | spatial models | design for manufacturability | equipment monitoring | equipment diagnosis | equipment control | run by run | multistage process control | scheduling | planning | factory modeling | factory infrastructure | environmental | health and safety | computer integrated manufacturing | factory operation | factory design | advanced process control | yield learning

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Naval Aviation (LOC) Naval Aviation (LOC)

Description

Subjects

libraryofcongress | libraryofcongress | rockaway | rockaway | rockawaybeach | rockawaybeach | unitedstatesnavy | unitedstatesnavy | usnavy | usnavy | usn | usn | aviation | aviation | navalaviation | navalaviation | rockawaynavalairstation | rockawaynavalairstation | rockawaynas | rockawaynas | flyingboat | flyingboat | airplane | airplane | biplane | biplane | seaplane | seaplane | gasholder | gasholder | observationballoon | observationballoon | bunoa1070 | bunoa1070 | a1070 | a1070 | aircraft | aircraft | militaryaviation | militaryaviation | curtissaeroplanecompany | curtissaeroplanecompany | curtiss | curtiss | curtissh16 | curtissh16 | h16 | h16 | navalaircraftfactory | navalaircraftfactory | naf | naf | navalaircraftfactoryh16 | navalaircraftfactoryh16 | nafh16 | nafh16 | libertyengine | libertyengine | libertyl12 | libertyl12 | liberty12 | liberty12

License

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Navy Aviation (LOC) Navy Aviation (LOC)

Description

Subjects

libraryofcongress | libraryofcongress | rockaway | rockaway | rockawaybeach | rockawaybeach | unitedstatesnavy | unitedstatesnavy | usnavy | usnavy | usn | usn | aviation | aviation | navalaviation | navalaviation | observationballoon | observationballoon | rockawaynavalairstation | rockawaynavalairstation | rockawaynas | rockawaynas | gasholder | gasholder | airplane | airplane | aircraft | aircraft | flyingboat | flyingboat | seaplane | seaplane | biplane | biplane | bunoa1070 | bunoa1070 | a1070 | a1070 | militaryaviation | militaryaviation | curtissaeroplanecompany | curtissaeroplanecompany | curtiss | curtiss | curtissh16 | curtissh16 | h16 | h16 | navalaircraftfactory | navalaircraftfactory | naf | naf | navalaircraftfactoryh16 | navalaircraftfactoryh16 | nafh16 | nafh16 | libertyengine | libertyengine | libertyl12 | libertyl12 | liberty12 | liberty12

License

No known copyright restrictions

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View of munition factory, Waterford

Description

Subjects

ahpoole | arthurhenripoole | poolecollection | glassnegative | nationallibraryofireland | factory | munition | bilberry | riversuir | river | snow | waterford | munster | firstworldwar | cartridges | 1917 | 18poundershellcasings | longgone | waterfordcartridgefactory | cartridgefactory

License

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9.14 Brain Structure and its Origins (MIT) 9.14 Brain Structure and its Origins (MIT)

Description

This course covers major CNS structures with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include basic patterns of connections in CNS, embryogenesis, PNS anatomy and development, process outgrowth and synaptogenesis, growth factors and cell survival, spinal and hindbrain anatomy, and development of regional specificity with an introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution. A review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture) is also covered as well as the trigeminal system, retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration, neocortex anatomy and development, the olfactory system, corpus striatum, brain transplants, the limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity. This course covers major CNS structures with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include basic patterns of connections in CNS, embryogenesis, PNS anatomy and development, process outgrowth and synaptogenesis, growth factors and cell survival, spinal and hindbrain anatomy, and development of regional specificity with an introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution. A review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture) is also covered as well as the trigeminal system, retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration, neocortex anatomy and development, the olfactory system, corpus striatum, brain transplants, the limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.

Subjects

CNS structures | CNS structures | development | development | plasticity | plasticity | anatomy | anatomy | tissue culture | tissue culture | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | synaptogenesis | growth factors | growth factors | cell survival | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | olfactory system | corpus striatum | corpus striatum | brain transplants | brain transplants | limbic system | limbic system | Development | Development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT) 8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments.  Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, 8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments.  Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories,

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC) | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Development of the Mammalian Brain (MIT) Development of the Mammalian Brain (MIT)

Description

Lectures plus guided readings and discussion with project reports, covering major CNS structures, with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include: basic patterns of connections in CNS; review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture); embryogenesis; PNS anatomy and development; process outgrowth and synaptogenesis; growth factors and cell survival; spinal and hindbrain anatomy; development of regional specificity with introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution; trigeminal system; retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration; neocortex anatomy and development; olfactory system; corpus striatum; brain transplants; limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.Technical RequirementsMedia play Lectures plus guided readings and discussion with project reports, covering major CNS structures, with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include: basic patterns of connections in CNS; review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture); embryogenesis; PNS anatomy and development; process outgrowth and synaptogenesis; growth factors and cell survival; spinal and hindbrain anatomy; development of regional specificity with introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution; trigeminal system; retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration; neocortex anatomy and development; olfactory system; corpus striatum; brain transplants; limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.Technical RequirementsMedia play

Subjects

CNS structures | CNS structures | development | development | plasticity | plasticity | anatomy | anatomy | tissue culture | tissue culture | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | synaptogenesis | growth factors | growth factors | cell survival | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | olfactory system | corpus striatum | corpus striatum | brain transplants | brain transplants | limbic system | limbic system | Mammals -- Physiology | Mammals -- Physiology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT) STS.001 Technology in American History (MIT)

Description

This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process. This course will consider the ways in which technology, broadly defined, has contributed to the building of American society from colonial times to the present. This course has three primary goals: to train students to ask critical questions of both technology and the broader American culture of which it is a part; to provide an historical perspective with which to frame and address such questions; and to encourage students to be neither blind critics of new technologies, nor blind advocates for technologies in general, but thoughtful and educated participants in the democratic process.

Subjects

colonization | colonization | Civil War | Civil War | World War II | World War II | Cold War | Cold War | industrialization | industrialization | mass production | mass production | craftsmanship | craftsmanship | transportation | transportation | Taylorism | Taylorism | aeronautics | aeronautics | systems approach | systems approach | computers | computers | control | control | automation | automation | nature | nature | popular culture | popular culture | terrorism | terrorism | rural society | rural society | agrarian society | agrarian society | artisan society | artisan society | industrial society | industrial society | power | power | industrial capitalism | industrial capitalism | factory system | factory system | transport | transport | communication | communication | industrial corporation | industrial corporation | social relations | social relations | production | production | science-based industry | science-based industry | technology | technology | innovation | innovation | process | process | social criteria | social criteria | American history | American history | America | America | technologies | technologies | democratic process | democratic process | political | political | politics | politics | social | social | progress | progress | United States | United States | U.S. | U.S.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.651 Art Since 1940 (MIT) 4.651 Art Since 1940 (MIT)

Description

This subject focuses on the objects, history, context, and critical discussion surrounding art since World War II. Because of the burgeoning increase in art production, the course is necessarily selective. We will trace major developments and movements in art up to the present, primarily from the US; but we will also be looking at art from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as art "on the margins" — art that has been overlooked by the mainstream critical press, but may have a broad cultural base in its own community. We will ask what function art serves in its various cultures of origin, and why art has been such a lightning rod for political issues around the world. This subject focuses on the objects, history, context, and critical discussion surrounding art since World War II. Because of the burgeoning increase in art production, the course is necessarily selective. We will trace major developments and movements in art up to the present, primarily from the US; but we will also be looking at art from Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as art "on the margins" — art that has been overlooked by the mainstream critical press, but may have a broad cultural base in its own community. We will ask what function art serves in its various cultures of origin, and why art has been such a lightning rod for political issues around the world.

Subjects

contemporary art | contemporary art | modernism | modernism | minimalist art | minimalist art | Warhol's factory | Warhol's factory | Jackson Pollock | Jackson Pollock | painting | painting | expression | expression | art and politics | art and politics | fluxus | fluxus

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 G-Protein Coupled Receptors: Vision and Disease (MIT) 7.342 G-Protein Coupled Receptors: Vision and Disease (MIT)

Description

How do we communicate with the outside world? How are our senses of vision, smell, taste and pain controlled at the cellular and molecular levels? What causes medical conditions like allergies, hypertension, depression, obesity and various central nervous system disorders? G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) provide a major part of the answer to all of these questions. GPCRs constitute the largest family of cell-surface receptors and in humans are encoded by more than 1,000 genes. GPCRs convert extracellular messages into intracellular responses and are involved in essentially all physiological processes. GPCR dysfunction results in numerous human disorders, and over 50% of all prescription drugs on the market today directly or indirectly target GPCRs. In this course, we will discuss GPCR How do we communicate with the outside world? How are our senses of vision, smell, taste and pain controlled at the cellular and molecular levels? What causes medical conditions like allergies, hypertension, depression, obesity and various central nervous system disorders? G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) provide a major part of the answer to all of these questions. GPCRs constitute the largest family of cell-surface receptors and in humans are encoded by more than 1,000 genes. GPCRs convert extracellular messages into intracellular responses and are involved in essentially all physiological processes. GPCR dysfunction results in numerous human disorders, and over 50% of all prescription drugs on the market today directly or indirectly target GPCRs. In this course, we will discuss GPCR

Subjects

allergies | allergies | hypertension | hypertension | depression | depression | obesity | obesity | central nervous system disorders | central nervous system disorders | G-protein coupled receptors | G-protein coupled receptors | GPCR | GPCR | cell-surface receptors | cell-surface receptors | George Wald | George Wald | vision | vision | chromophore | chromophore | transducin | transducin | metarhodopsin II | metarhodopsin II | homodimers | homodimers | heterodimers | heterodimers | retinitis pigmentosa | retinitis pigmentosa | night blindness | night blindness | Dopamine | Dopamine | antihistamines | antihistamines | Claviceps purpurea | Claviceps purpurea | Human chemokine receptor 5 | Human chemokine receptor 5 | CCR5 | CCR5 | HIV-1 | HIV-1 | CCR5-delta32 | CCR5-delta32 | Olfactory receptors | Olfactory receptors | Taste receptors | Taste receptors

License

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT) 8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m 8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC) | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT) 11.307 Beijing Urban Design Studio (MIT)

Description

In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an In 2008, the Beijing Urban Design Studio will focus on the issue of Beijing's urban transformation under the theme of de-industrialization, by preparing an urban design and development plan for the Shougang (Capital Steel Factory) site. This studio will address whether portions of the old massive factory infrastructure can be preserved as a national industrial heritage site embedded into future new development; how to balance the cultural and recreational value of the site with environmental challenges; as well as how to use the site for urban development. A special focus of the studio will be to consider development approaches that minimize energy utilization. To research these questions, students will be asked to interact with clients from the factory, local residents, city officials an

Subjects

Beijing | Beijing | China | China | urban design | urban design | development | development | shougang | shougang | capital steel factory | capital steel factory | de-industrialization | de-industrialization | Olympic Games | Olympic Games | site redevelopment | site redevelopment | heritage site | heritage site | environment | environment | urban development | urban development | energy | energy | site understanding | site understanding | land use | land use | design concept | design concept | bioremediation | bioremediation | transit | transit | subway | subway | light rail | light rail | urban planning | urban planning | architecture | architecture | brownfield | brownfield

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.760B Introduction to Operations Management (MIT) 15.760B Introduction to Operations Management (MIT)

Description

This half-term course introduces students to problems and analysis related to the design, planning, control, and improvement of manufacturing and service operations. Class sessions involve explaining concepts, working examples, and discussing cases. A wide range of topics are covered, including: process analysis, quality management, supply chain design, procurement, and product development. Toward the end of the course, students work in teams to manage a virtual factory in a web-based simulation exercise. This half-term course introduces students to problems and analysis related to the design, planning, control, and improvement of manufacturing and service operations. Class sessions involve explaining concepts, working examples, and discussing cases. A wide range of topics are covered, including: process analysis, quality management, supply chain design, procurement, and product development. Toward the end of the course, students work in teams to manage a virtual factory in a web-based simulation exercise.

Subjects

operations management | operations management | service operations | service operations | manufacturing design | manufacturing design | manufacturing planning | manufacturing planning | production control | production control | quality management | quality management | process design | process design | reengineering | reengineering | product development | product development | project management | project management | supply chain design | supply chain design | improving manufacturing processes | improving manufacturing processes | capacity | capacity | inventory | inventory | quality control | quality control | product design | product design | factory management | factory management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.336 Marketing, Microchips and McDonalds: Debating Globalization (MIT) 21A.336 Marketing, Microchips and McDonalds: Debating Globalization (MIT)

Description

Everyday we are bombarded with the word "global" and encouraged to see globalization as the quintessential transformation of our age. But what exactly does "globalization" mean? How is it affecting the lives of people around the world, not only in economic, but social and cultural terms? How do contemporary changes compare with those from other historical periods? Are such changes positive, negative or simply inevitable? And, finally, how does the concept of the "global" itself shape our perceptions in ways that both help us understand the contemporary world and potentially distort it? This course begins by offering a brief overview of historical "world systems," including those centered in Asia as well as Europe. It explores the nature of contemporary transformations, including th Everyday we are bombarded with the word "global" and encouraged to see globalization as the quintessential transformation of our age. But what exactly does "globalization" mean? How is it affecting the lives of people around the world, not only in economic, but social and cultural terms? How do contemporary changes compare with those from other historical periods? Are such changes positive, negative or simply inevitable? And, finally, how does the concept of the "global" itself shape our perceptions in ways that both help us understand the contemporary world and potentially distort it? This course begins by offering a brief overview of historical "world systems," including those centered in Asia as well as Europe. It explores the nature of contemporary transformations, including th

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | marketing | marketing | globalization | globalization | culture | culture | class | class | economic status | economic status | social dynamics | social dynamics | technology | technology | capitalism | capitalism | java | java | amazon | amazon | france | france | united states | united states | bombay | bombay | india | india | japan | japan | immigration | immigration | film | film | workers | workers | tourism | tourism | factory labor | factory labor | global | global | economic transformation | economic transformation | media | media | political transformation | political transformation | geographic tranformation | geographic tranformation | history | history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT) STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT)

Description

Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology, Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology,

Subjects

history | history | technology | technology | science | science | techne | techne | industry | industry | intellectual history | intellectual history | cultural history | cultural history | management | management | engineering | engineering | industrial arts | industrial arts | mechanism | mechanism | mechanical arts | mechanical arts | technological determinism | technological determinism | manufacturing | manufacturing | manufactures | manufactures | factory | factory | capitalism | capitalism | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | innovation | innovation | ecology | ecology | environmentalism | environmentalism | pollution | pollution | literature | literature | American history | American history | the Enlightenment | the Enlightenment | industrialization | industrialization | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.464 Cultural History of Technology (MIT) STS.464 Cultural History of Technology (MIT)

Description

The subject of this course is the historical process by which the meaning of "technology" has been constructed. Although the word itself is traceable to the ancient Greek root teckhne (meaning art), it did not enter the English language until the 17th century, and did not acquire its current meaning until after World War I. The aim of the course, then, is to explore various sectors of industrializing 19th and 20th century Western society and culture with a view to explaining and assessing the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary (especially Anglo-American) thought and expression. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to y The subject of this course is the historical process by which the meaning of "technology" has been constructed. Although the word itself is traceable to the ancient Greek root teckhne (meaning art), it did not enter the English language until the 17th century, and did not acquire its current meaning until after World War I. The aim of the course, then, is to explore various sectors of industrializing 19th and 20th century Western society and culture with a view to explaining and assessing the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary (especially Anglo-American) thought and expression. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to y

Subjects

history | history | technology | technology | science | science | techne | techne | industry | industry | intellectual history | intellectual history | cultural history | cultural history | management | management | engineering | engineering | industrial arts | industrial arts | mechanism | mechanism | mechanic arts | mechanic arts | mechanical arts | mechanical arts | Bigelow | Bigelow | Taylorism | Taylorism | determinism | determinism | technological determinism | technological determinism | manufacturing | manufacturing | manufactures | manufactures | factory | factory | capitalism | capitalism | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | innovation | innovation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Candlemaker

Description

Subjects

candles | execution | no6 | ashtown | 1488 | thomasmayne | lanternslides | nationallibraryofireland | 29october1923 | irishfreestate | rathbournes | thomasfitzgerald | williamdownes | limerickbybeachcomber | thomasholmesmason | thomashmasonsonslimited | pianoandfactorycandles | johngrathborne | pianocandles | factorycandles | servantscandles | makelovewiththelightsout | millenniumcandles | dublinmillennium1988

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No known copyright restrictions

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Rough turning the shell body

Description

Rough turning the shell body at the National Projectile Factory, Birtley 14 June 1916 (TWAM ref. 1027/271). These images belong to an album of photographs taken in the National Projectile Factory, Birtley (near Gateshead) during the First World War. The photographs were taken by Sir W.G. Armstrong Whitworth & Co Ltd, who built the factory. The images date from June 1916, shortly after the factory became operational. What makes the factory (and these photographs of it) so special is that all the management and workers there were Belgian. The factory and the nearby village of Elisabethville (built to accommodate them) were like a little corner of Belgium transplanted to the North East of England. More information about the factory and the village of Elisabethville can be found in the blog, which accompanies this set. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

ww1 | firstworldwar | nationalprojectilefactory | birtley | birtleybelgians | socialhistory | sirwgarmstrongwhitworthcoltd | shellmanufacture | elisabethville | machinery | gunshells | blackandwhitephotograph | industrialheritage | blet | steel | metal | belt | machine | cylinder | symbol | number | dust | particles | debris | shellbody | roughturning | 14june1916 | gateshead | factory | operational | belgianworkers | belgium | northeastofengland | label | handle | wheel | beam | ceiling | pipe | cap | blazer | coat | shirt | moustache | cleanshaven | hand | grip | concentration | comradeship | uniform | pattern | steam | ladder | bolt | wall | plate | table | platform | intricate | hole | opening | arrow | letters | numbers | men | male | unusual | industry

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Rough facing

Description

Rough face and rough radius at the National Projectile Factory, Birtley, 14 June 1916 (TWAM ref. 1027/271). These images belong to an album of photographs taken in the National Projectile Factory, Birtley (near Gateshead) during the First World War. The photographs were taken by Sir W.G. Armstrong Whitworth & Co Ltd, who built the factory. The images date from June 1916, shortly after the factory became operational. What makes the factory (and these photographs of it) so special is that all the management and workers there were Belgian. The factory and the nearby village of Elisabethville (built to accommodate them) were like a little corner of Belgium transplanted to the North East of England. More information about the factory and the village of Elisabethville can be found in the blog, which accompanies this set. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

ww1 | firstworldwar | nationalprojectilefactory | birtley | birtleybelgians | socialhistory | sirwgarmstrongwhitworthcoltd | shellmanufacture | elisabethville | machinery | gunshells | men | numbers | letters | arrow | intricate | platform | table | plate | wall | bolt | ladder | pattern | comradeship | concentration | grip | hand | cleanshaven | moustache | coat | blazer | cap | pipe | ceiling | beam | wheel | handle | label | northeastofengland | belgium | blackandwhitephotograph | industrialheritage | blet | steel | metal | belt | machine | cylinder | symbol | number | dust | particles | debris | shellbody | 14june1916 | gateshead | factory | operational | belgianworkers | ring | bar | timber | boot | sock | shoe | trousers | opening | unusual

License

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Boring to fit the disc

Description

Boring to fit the disc, rough and finish facing at the National Projectile Factory, Birtley, 14 June 1916 (TWAM ref. 1027/271). These images belong to an album of photographs taken in the National Projectile Factory, Birtley (near Gateshead) during the First World War. The photographs were taken by Sir W.G. Armstrong Whitworth & Co Ltd, who built the factory. The images date from June 1916, shortly after the factory became operational. What makes the factory (and these photographs of it) so special is that all the management and workers there were Belgian. The factory and the nearby village of Elisabethville (built to accommodate them) were like a little corner of Belgium transplanted to the North East of England. More information about the factory and the village of Elisabethville can be found in the blog, which accompanies this set. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

ww1 | firstworldwar | nationalprojectilefactory | birtley | birtleybelgians | socialhistory | sirwgarmstrongwhitworthcoltd | shellmanufacture | elisabethville | machinery | gunshells | thebirtleybelgians | industrialheritage | industry | abstract | blackandwhitephotograph | digitalimage | archives | documentation | factory | floor | debris | components | boring | disc | 14june1916 | workers | cap | fabric | crease | label | letters | digits | discolour | grain | mark | blur | gateshead | operational | belgian | management | belgium | northeastofengland | unitedkingdom | precision | working | standing | bending | engaging | unusual | fascinating | interesting | compelling | wareffort | production | belt | wall | ceiling | beam | cog | cylinder | bench | bar | pocket | button | attentive | task

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Riveting of the base plate

Description

Riveting of the base plate of a shell at the National Projectile Factory, Birtley, 21 June 1916 (TWAM ref. 1027/271). These images belong to an album of photographs taken in the National Projectile Factory, Birtley (near Gateshead) during the First World War. The photographs were taken by Sir W.G. Armstrong Whitworth & Co Ltd, who built the factory. The images date from June 1916, shortly after the factory became operational. What makes the factory (and these photographs of it) so special is that all the management and workers there were Belgian. The factory and the nearby village of Elisabethville (built to accommodate them) were like a little corner of Belgium transplanted to the North East of England. More information about the factory and the village of Elisabethville can be found in the blog, which accompanies this set. (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

Subjects

ww1 | firstworldwar | nationalprojectilefactory | birtley | birtleybelgians | socialhistory | sirwgarmstrongwhitworthcoltd | shellmanufacture | elisabethville | machinery | gunshells | blackandwhitephotograph | industrialheritage | machine | factory | riveting | baseplate | shell | 21june1916 | gateshead | operational | belgianworkers | northeastofengland | uniform | boot | hat | workoveralls | cylinder | bench | wood | metal | steel | bolts | platform | lever | belt | wheel | cog | bar | ceiling | pulley | beam | ladder | wall | standing | operating | tool | assembly | concentration | teamwork | cleanshaven | shorthair | ears | nose | eyes | hand | handle | shadow | debris | parts | unusual

License

No known copyright restrictions

Site sourced from

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