Searching for fairness : 15 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1

24.04J Justice (MIT) 24.04J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse. This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse.

Subjects

social justice | social justice | liberty | liberty | equality | equality | utilitarianism | utilitarianism | libertarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | egalitarian liberalism | entitlement | entitlement | immigration | immigration | fairness | fairness | ghetto poor | ghetto poor | global poor | global poor | principles | principles | moral desert | moral desert | welfare contractualism | welfare contractualism | G.A. Cohen | G.A. Cohen | Jeremy Bentham | Jeremy Bentham | John Stuart Mill | John Stuart Mill | Robert Nozick | Robert Nozick | Milton Friedman | Milton Friedman

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-24.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT) 14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT)

Description

14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them. 14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them.

Subjects

racial discrimination | racial discrimination | public health and persuasion | public health and persuasion | incentives | incentives | gender differences in economic environments | gender differences in economic environments | intrinsic motivation and fairness | intrinsic motivation and fairness | educational quality | educational quality | corruption | corruption | learning and social effects | learning and social effects | housing experiments | housing experiments | voting behavior and political economy | voting behavior and political economy | jury advocacy | jury advocacy | causal inference | causal inference | internal and external threats | internal and external threats | clustering | clustering | standard errors | standard errors | randomization | randomization | statistical inference with multiple outcomes | statistical inference with multiple outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT) 14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena. This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect | prospect | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | economics | economics | behavior | behavior | preferences | preferences | cognition | cognition | trust | trust | vengence | vengence | impatience | impatience | impulsivity | impulsivity | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | reinforcement | reinforcement | classical conditioning | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | loss-aversion | over-confidence | over-confidence | self-serving biases | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | equilibrium | rational choice | rational choice | utility maximization | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | game theory | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT) 14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process. This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | behavioral economics | finance | finance | psychology | psychology | prospect theory | prospect theory | bias | bias | probabilistic judgment | probabilistic judgment | self-control | self-control | mental accounting | mental accounting | fairness | fairness | altruism | altruism | public goods | public goods | market anomalies | market anomalies | market theories | market theories | heuristics | heuristics | noise | noise | confusion | confusion | competition | competition | bounded rationality | bounded rationality | learning | learning | games | games | neuroeconomics | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | consumption | hyperbolics | hyperbolics | temptation | temptation | assets | assets | puzzles | puzzles | bubbles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.493 Legal Aspects of Property and Land Use (MIT) 11.493 Legal Aspects of Property and Land Use (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to offer an advanced introduction to key legal issues that arise in the area of property and land-use in American law, with a comparative focus on the laws of India and South Africa. The focus of the course is not on law itself, but on the policy implications of various rules, doctrines and practices which are covered in great detail. Legal rules regulating property are among the most fundamental to American, and most other, economies and societies. The main focus is on American property and land use law due to its prominence in international development policy and practice as a model, though substantial comparative legal materials are also introduced from selected non-western countries such as India and South Africa. This course is designed to offer an advanced introduction to key legal issues that arise in the area of property and land-use in American law, with a comparative focus on the laws of India and South Africa. The focus of the course is not on law itself, but on the policy implications of various rules, doctrines and practices which are covered in great detail. Legal rules regulating property are among the most fundamental to American, and most other, economies and societies. The main focus is on American property and land use law due to its prominence in international development policy and practice as a model, though substantial comparative legal materials are also introduced from selected non-western countries such as India and South Africa.

Subjects

property law | property law | law | law | property | property | land use | land use | property fairness | property fairness | competition | competition | public trust | public trust | trespass | trespass | fair use | fair use | easements | easements | nuisance laws | nuisance laws | zoning | zoning | environmental regulations | environmental regulations | slavery | slavery | racial discrimination | racial discrimination | gender discrimination | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | economic discrimination | takings | takings | licenses | licenses | servitudes | servitudes | contestation | contestation | covenants | covenants | common ownership | common ownership | housing | housing | apartheid | apartheid | restitution | restitution | eviction | eviction | displacement | displacement | international development | international development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-11.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT)

Description

14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them.

Subjects

racial discrimination | public health and persuasion | incentives | gender differences in economic environments | intrinsic motivation and fairness | educational quality | corruption | learning and social effects | housing experiments | voting behavior and political economy | jury advocacy | causal inference | internal and external threats | clustering | standard errors | randomization | statistical inference with multiple outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | economics | behavior | preferences | cognition | trust | vengence | impatience | impulsivity | bounded rationality | learning | reinforcement | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | over-confidence | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | rational choice | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | heuristics | noise | confusion | competition | bounded rationality | learning | games | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | hyperbolics | temptation | assets | puzzles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.13 Economics and Psychology (MIT)

Description

This course integrates psychological insights into economic models of behavior. It discusses the limitations of standard economic models and surveys the ways in which psychological experiments have been used to learn about preferences, cognition, and behavior. Topics include: trust, vengeance, fairness, impatience, impulsivity, bounded rationality, learning, reinforcement, classical conditioning, loss-aversion, over-confidence, self-serving biases, cognitive dissonance, altruism, subjective well-being, and hedonic adaptation. Economic concepts such as equilibrium, rational choice, utility maximization, Bayesian beliefs, game theory, and behavior under uncertainty are discussed in light of these phenomena.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | economics | behavior | preferences | cognition | trust | vengence | impatience | impulsivity | bounded rationality | learning | reinforcement | classical conditioning | loss-aversion | over-confidence | self-serving biases | cognitive dissonance | subjective well-being | hedonic adaptation | equilibrium | rational choice | utility maximization | Bayesian beliefs | game theory | neuroeconomics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.127 Behavioral Economics and Finance (MIT)

Description

This course surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Topics include: prospect theory, biases in probabilistic judgment, self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings, fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions, financial market anomalies and theories, impact of markets, learning, and incentives, and memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subjects

behavioral economics | finance | psychology | prospect theory | bias | probabilistic judgment | self-control | mental accounting | fairness | altruism | public goods | market anomalies | market theories | heuristics | noise | confusion | competition | bounded rationality | learning | games | neuroeconomics | hyperbolic discounting | consumption | hyperbolics | temptation | assets | puzzles | bubbles | Gul-Pesendorfer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allsimplifiedchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

11.493 Legal Aspects of Property and Land Use (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to offer an advanced introduction to key legal issues that arise in the area of property and land-use in American law, with a comparative focus on the laws of India and South Africa. The focus of the course is not on law itself, but on the policy implications of various rules, doctrines and practices which are covered in great detail. Legal rules regulating property are among the most fundamental to American, and most other, economies and societies. The main focus is on American property and land use law due to its prominence in international development policy and practice as a model, though substantial comparative legal materials are also introduced from selected non-western countries such as India and South Africa.

Subjects

property law | law | property | land use | property fairness | competition | public trust | trespass | fair use | easements | nuisance laws | zoning | environmental regulations | slavery | racial discrimination | gender discrimination | economic discrimination | takings | licenses | servitudes | contestation | covenants | common ownership | housing | apartheid | restitution | eviction | displacement | international development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

24.04J Justice (MIT)

Description

This course explores the ideal of social justice. What makes a society just? We will approach this question by studying three opposing theories of justice—utilitarianism, libertarianism, and egalitarian liberalism—each foundational to contemporary political thought and discourse.

Subjects

social justice | liberty | equality | utilitarianism | libertarianism | egalitarian liberalism | entitlement | immigration | fairness | ghetto poor | global poor | principles | moral desert | welfare contractualism | G.A. Cohen | Jeremy Bentham | John Stuart Mill | Robert Nozick | Milton Friedman

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Justice and Fairness resource

Description

This resource helps young people to understand how the principles of justice and fairness are applied in the specific context of armed conflict using images, debate and discussion.

Subjects

justice | fairness | armed conflict | young people | Social studies | Historical and Philosophical studies | Education | philosophical studies | X000 | V000 | L000 | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Assessment and Reflection on Professional Practice

Description

During this lesson, we will select and use specialist approaches and tools to conduct literacy and language assessments fairly and equitably. Included in this, we will look at how to best involve literacy learners in the processes of assessment. We will also look at how to record relevant specialist assessment information effectively to inform teaching and learning. Following on from this, we will use critical reflection and feedback from others to evaluate and improve your own literacy and language practice. Finally, we will look at planning and take up of opportunities to improve your own knowledge and understanding about integrating theory into practice.

Subjects

fairness and equitability | learning infrastructure | learning journey | kolbs learning cycle | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

14.11 Putting Social Sciences to the Test: Field Experiments in Economics (MIT)

Description

14.11 is a new class on the topic of field (that is, 'in situ') and laboratory experiments in the social sciences - both what these experiments have taught and can teach us and how to conduct them.

Subjects

racial discrimination | public health and persuasion | incentives | gender differences in economic environments | intrinsic motivation and fairness | educational quality | corruption | learning and social effects | housing experiments | voting behavior and political economy | jury advocacy | causal inference | internal and external threats | clustering | standard errors | randomization | statistical inference with multiple outcomes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allpersiancourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata