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Children of Mary. Children of Mary.

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Subjects

kilkenny | kilkenny | ireland | ireland | june | june | 20thcentury | 20thcentury | 1915 | 1915 | glassnegative | glassnegative | leinster | leinster | mullinavat | mullinavat | cokilkenny | cokilkenny | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | holyfaith | holyfaith | childrenofmary | childrenofmary | miraculousmedals | miraculousmedals | ahpoole | ahpoole | sodalities | sodalities | poolecollection | poolecollection | arthurhenripoole | arthurhenripoole | hatoriffic | hatoriffic | revmother | revmother | conventofholyfaith | conventofholyfaith | childrenofmarysodalities | childrenofmarysodalities | muileannanbhata | muileannanbhata | conventofmountstjoseph | conventofmountstjoseph

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Sermon: Charles de Foucauld Sermon: Charles de Foucauld

Description

Homily for Thursday College Eucharist on 1 December 2011 in Oriel College Chapel delivered by the Chaplain, Revd Dr Robert Tobin. Homily for Thursday College Eucharist on 1 December 2011 in Oriel College Chapel delivered by the Chaplain, Revd Dr Robert Tobin.

Subjects

ground of faith | ground of faith | sermon | sermon | charles de foucauld | charles de foucauld | ground of faith | sermon | charles de foucauld | 2011-12-01 | ground of faith | sermon | charles de foucauld | 2011-12-01

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Why study systematic theology? : with Karen Kilby in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin Why study systematic theology? : with Karen Kilby in discussion with Professor Tom O'Loughlin

Description

In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr Karen Kilby, an expert in systematic theology, explains what is meant by ‘systematics’ within the field of theology, and how it emerges out of the questions that believers ask in seeking to make sense of their faith. In this episode of the ‘Why Study’ series, Dr Karen Kilby, an expert in systematic theology, explains what is meant by ‘systematics’ within the field of theology, and how it emerges out of the questions that believers ask in seeking to make sense of their faith.

Subjects

UNow | UNow | ukoer | ukoer | meaning | meaning | religion | religion | questions | questions | faith | faith | belief | belief | reason | reason | systematics | systematics

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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Our Religious Traditions in a long Historical Perspective

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | history | interfaith | religion | humanitas | history

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Two Concepts of Sharia?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | sharia | humanitas | islam | interfaith | religion | sharia | humanitas | islam

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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: Where do we find ourselves now?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | liberalism | interfaith | religion | humanitas | liberalism

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Resisting Apologetics: What can we learn from Ibn Rushd and our contemporaries?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | apologetics | interfaith | religion | humanitas | apologetics

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Irshad Manji on Allah, Liberty and Love

Description

The director of the Moral Courage Project says so-called ?respect? for Muslims is often lined with fear and ?low expectations? of those practising the faith. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

islam | faith | free speech | freedom | liberty | islam | faith | free speech | freedom | liberty

License

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24.00 Problems in Philosophy (MIT) 24.00 Problems in Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two goals. First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. Here we look at a number of perennial philosophical problems, including some or all of: how knowledge differs from "mere opinion," the objectivity (or not) of moral judgment, logical paradoxes, mind/body relations, the nature and possibility of free will, and how a person remains the same over time, as their bodily and psychological traits change. The second goal is to get you thinking philosophically yourself. This will help you develop your critical and argumentative skills more generally. Readings will be from late, great classical authors and influential contemporary figures. The course has two goals. First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. Here we look at a number of perennial philosophical problems, including some or all of: how knowledge differs from "mere opinion," the objectivity (or not) of moral judgment, logical paradoxes, mind/body relations, the nature and possibility of free will, and how a person remains the same over time, as their bodily and psychological traits change. The second goal is to get you thinking philosophically yourself. This will help you develop your critical and argumentative skills more generally. Readings will be from late, great classical authors and influential contemporary figures.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | existence | existence | God | God | reason | reason | faith | faith | mind-body | mind-body | free will | free will | identity | identity | deontology | deontology | morality | morality | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | materialism | materialism | functionalism | functionalism | argument | argument | pascal's wager | pascal's wager | compatibilism | compatibilism | determinism | determinism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Our Religious Traditions in a long Historical Perspective

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | history | interfaith | religion | humanitas | history

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Two Concepts of Sharia?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | sharia | humanitas | islam | interfaith | religion | sharia | humanitas | islam

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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: Where do we find ourselves now?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | liberalism | interfaith | religion | humanitas | liberalism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Resisting Apologetics: What can we learn from Ibn Rushd and our contemporaries?

Description

Professor Abdou Filali-Ansary gives a lecture for the Humanitas lecture series on Interfaith Studies. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

interfaith | religion | humanitas | apologetics | interfaith | religion | humanitas | apologetics

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21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT) 21L.707 Writing Early American Lives: Gender, Race, Nation, Faith (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers. This course focuses on the period between roughly 1550-1850. American ideas of race had taken on a certain shape by the middle of the nineteenth century, consolidated by legislation, economics, and the institution of chattel slavery. But both race and identity meant very different things three hundred years earlier, both in their dictionary definitions and in their social consequences. How did people constitute their identities in early America, and how did they speak about these identities? Texts will include travel writing, captivity narratives, orations, letters, and poems, by Native American, English, Anglo-American, African, and Afro-American writers.

Subjects

Literature | Literature | writing | writing | early American | early American | lives | lives | gender | gender | race | race | nation | nation | faith | faith | Nineteenth century | Nineteenth century | legislation | legislation | economics | economics | slavery | slavery | narratives | narratives | orations | orations | letters | letters | poems | poems | Native American | Native American | English | English | Anglo-American | Anglo-American | African | African | Afro-American | Afro-American

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT) 24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why.  This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally. The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why.  This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | moral conduct | moral conduct | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | free will | free will | faith | faith

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community and Economic Development (MIT) 11.401 Introduction to Housing, Community and Economic Development (MIT)

Description

As an introduction to the field of Housing, Community, and Economic Development (HCED), the course is structured to: Advance student's understanding of how public policy and private markets affect housing, economic development, the local economy, and neighborhood institutions; Provide an overview of techniques for framing public and private interventions to meet housing and community development agendas, broadly defined, of inner city and low income neighborhoods; Review and critique specific programs, policies and strategies that are (and have been) directed at local development and neighborhood regeneration issues; Give students an opportunity to reflect on their personal sense of the "housing, community, and economic development" process and the various roles that planner As an introduction to the field of Housing, Community, and Economic Development (HCED), the course is structured to: Advance student's understanding of how public policy and private markets affect housing, economic development, the local economy, and neighborhood institutions; Provide an overview of techniques for framing public and private interventions to meet housing and community development agendas, broadly defined, of inner city and low income neighborhoods; Review and critique specific programs, policies and strategies that are (and have been) directed at local development and neighborhood regeneration issues; Give students an opportunity to reflect on their personal sense of the "housing, community, and economic development" process and the various roles that planner

Subjects

Public policy | Public policy | Private markets | Private markets | Housing | Housing | Economic development | Economic development | The local economy | The local economy | Neighborhood institutions | Neighborhood institutions | Public and private interventions | Public and private interventions | Housing and community development agendas | Housing and community development agendas | Inner city and low income neighborhoods | Inner city and low income neighborhoods | local economies | local economies | low income neighborhoods | low income neighborhoods | community development | community development | urban neighborhoods | urban neighborhoods | community organization | community organization | small business development | small business development | welfare | welfare | work | work | job training | job training | capital | capital | crime | crime | security | security | education | education | faith-based organizations | faith-based organizations

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing. In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

Subjects

Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The King James Bible: The End of the Road?

Description

A conversation between Melvyn Bragg and Diarmaid MacCulloch, chaired by the Chancellor of the University of Oxford, Lord Patten of Barnes. Recorded at the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, High Street, Oxford, Thursday 7 July, 6.00 pm.

Subjects

king james | bible | religion | faith | anniversary | theology faculty | christianity | literature | #greatwriters | 2011-07-07 | ukoer | king james | bible | religion | faith | anniversary | theology faculty | christianity | literature | #greatwriters | 2011-07-07

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The King James Bible: The End of the Road?

Description

A conversation between Melvyn Bragg and Diarmaid MacCulloch, chaired by the Chancellor of the University of Oxford, Lord Patten of Barnes. Recorded at the University Church of St Mary the Virgin, High Street, Oxford, Thursday 7 July, 6.00 pm.

Subjects

king james | bible | religion | faith | anniversary | theology faculty | christianity | literature | 2011-07-07 | ukoer | king james | bible | religion | faith | anniversary | theology faculty | christianity | literature | 2011-07-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/

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24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT) 24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally. The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why. This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally.

Subjects

Philosophy | Philosophy | problems | problems | philosophers | philosophers | think | think | existence | existence | God | God | reason | reason | faith | faith | mind-body | mind-body | freewill | freewill | moral responsibility | moral responsibility | standards | standards | moral conduct | moral conduct | history | history | contemporary authors | contemporary authors | skills | skills | critical | critical | argumentative | argumentative

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT) 21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Humans are social animals; social demands, both cooperative and competitive, structure our development, our brain and our mind. This course covers social development, social behaviour, social cognition and social neuroscience, in both human and non-human social animals. Topics include altruism, empathy, communication, theory of mind, aggression, power, groups, mating, and morality. Methods include evolutionary biology, neuroscience, cognitive science, social psychology and anthropology.

Subjects

21L.448 | 21L.448 | 21W.739 | 21W.739 | Origin of Species | Origin of Species | Darwin | Darwin | intelligent agency | intelligent agency | literature | literature | speculative thought | speculative thought | eighteenth century | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | Hume | Hume | Voltaire | Voltaire | Malthus | Malthus | Butler | Butler | Hardy | Hardy | H.G. Wells | H.G. Wells | Freud | Freud | Evolution | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Philosophy of science | Religion | Religion | Science | Science | Life Sciences | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | Social Aspects | History | History | Intelligent design | individual species | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | complexity | development | development | God theory of evolution | God theory of evolution | science | science | theological explanation | theological explanation | universe | universe | creatures | creatures | faith | faith | and theology | and theology | purpose of evolution | purpose of evolution | Design | Design | models | models | adaptation | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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De La Salle College, Waterford. Tug of War. De La Salle College, Waterford. Tug of War.

Description

Subjects

ahpoole | ahpoole | arthurhenripoole | arthurhenripoole | poolecollection | poolecollection | glassnegative | glassnegative | nationallibraryofireland | nationallibraryofireland | tugowar | tugowar | tugowarteam | tugowarteam | delasallecollege | delasallecollege | waterford | waterford | cowaterford | cowaterford | victories | victories | team | team | rope | rope | faithlegg | faithlegg | delesalle | delesalle | delasallebrothers | delasallebrothers

License

No known copyright restrictions

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24.00 Problems of Philosophy (MIT)

Description

The course has two main goals: First, to give you a sense of what philosophers think about and why.  This will be done through consideration of some perennial philosophical problems, e.g., the existence of God, reason and faith, personal identity and immortality, freewill, moral responsibility, and standards for moral conduct. We will draw on readings by important figures in the history of philosophy as well as contemporary authors. The second goal is to develop your philosophical skills, and your critical and argumentative skills more generally.

Subjects

Philosophy | moral conduct | moral responsibility | free will | faith

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.448J Darwin and Design (MIT)

Description

In the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin gave us a model for understanding how natural objects and systems can evidence design without positing a designer: how purpose and mechanism can exist without intelligent agency. Texts in this course deal with pre- and post-Darwinian treatment of this topic within literature and speculative thought since the eighteenth century. We will give some attention to the modern study of feedback mechanisms in artificial intelligence. Our reading will be in Hume, Voltaire, Malthus, Darwin, Butler, H. G. Wells, and Turing.

Subjects

Origin of Species | Darwin | intelligent agency | literature | speculative thought | eighteenth century | feedback mechanism | artificial intelligence | Hume | Voltaire | Malthus | Butler | Hardy | H.G. Wells | Freud | Evolution | Modern Western philosophy | Philosophy of science | Religion | Science | Life Sciences | Social Aspects | History | Intelligent design | individual species | complexity | development | God theory of evolution | science | theological explanation | universe | creatures | faith | and theology | purpose of evolution | Design | models | adaptation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Studying religion

Description

This free course, Studying religion, will give you an opportunity to think about some of the key concepts and methods of the discipline of Religious Studies. You will meet examples of different forms of religious practice and belief, mostly from Britain and India. First published on Mon, 21 Aug 2017 as Studying religion. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2017

Subjects

Religious Studies | faith | belief | religions | Hinduism | Judaism | Calcutta | A103_7

License

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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