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SP.414 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT) SP.414 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT)

Description

This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction of cyberidentiti This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction of cyberidentiti

Subjects

gender | gender | race | race | media studies | media studies | election coverage | election coverage | Sarah Palin | Sarah Palin | Hillary Clinton | Hillary Clinton | music videos | music videos | sexuality | sexuality | television | television | film | film | sports | sports | advertising | advertising | fashion | fashion | fandom | fandom | ethnicity | ethnicity | politics | politics | consumer culture | consumer culture | Saturday Night Live | Saturday Night Live | newspapers | newspapers | Internet | Internet | YouTube | YouTube | blogs | blogs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT) WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT)

Description

This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction

Subjects

gender | gender | race | race | media studies | media studies | election coverage | election coverage | Sarah Palin | Sarah Palin | Hillary Clinton | Hillary Clinton | music videos | music videos | sexuality | sexuality | television | television | film | film | sports | sports | advertising | advertising | fashion | fashion | fandom | fandom | ethnicity | ethnicity | politics | politics | consumer culture | consumer culture | Saturday Night Live | Saturday Night Live | newspapers | newspapers | Internet | Internet | YouTube | YouTube | blogs | blogs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 23: Creating Sequels Lecture 23: Creating Sequels

Description

Description: Sequels can improve on the original: fixing problems, adding new features, targeting an established fanbase, etc. This connection can also constrain the sequel concept and discourage new users. Sara Verrilli describes her experiences with the Thief games. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: sequel, intellectual property, franchise, fandom, reboot, target audience, market research, expansion pack, user feedbackTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Sequels can improve on the original: fixing problems, adding new features, targeting an established fanbase, etc. This connection can also constrain the sequel concept and discourage new users. Sara Verrilli describes her experiences with the Thief games. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: sequel, intellectual property, franchise, fandom, reboot, target audience, market research, expansion pack, user feedbackTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

sequel | sequel | intellectual property | intellectual property | franchise | franchise | fandom | fandom | reboot | reboot | target audience | target audience | market research | market research | expansion pack | expansion pack | user feedback | user feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT) 21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT)

Description

What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory. What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory.

Subjects

popular reading | popular reading | highbrow culture | highbrow culture | lowbrow culture | lowbrow culture | gender | gender | taste | taste | theory and practice of reading | theory and practice of reading | fanfiction | fanfiction | fandom | fandom | Oprah | Oprah | comics | comics | hypertext | hypertext | mass-market romance fiction | mass-market romance fiction | mega-chain bookstore | mega-chain bookstore | reader response theory | reader response theory | Harry Potter | Harry Potter | sociology and history of reading | sociology and history of reading | resistance | resistance | rare books | rare books | fads | fads | social engineering | social engineering | bestseller | bestseller

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.603 American Soap Operas (MIT) CMS.603 American Soap Operas (MIT)

Description

The television landscape has changed drastically in the past few years; nowhere is this more prevalent than in the American daytime serial drama, one of the oldest forms of television content. This class examines the history of these "soap operas" and their audiences by focusing on the production, consumption, and media texts of soaps. The class will include discussions of what makes soap operas a unique form, the history of the genre, current experimentation with transmedia storytelling, the online fan community, and comparisons between daytime dramas and primetime serials from 24 to Friday Night Lights, through a study of Procter & Gamble's As the World Turns. The television landscape has changed drastically in the past few years; nowhere is this more prevalent than in the American daytime serial drama, one of the oldest forms of television content. This class examines the history of these "soap operas" and their audiences by focusing on the production, consumption, and media texts of soaps. The class will include discussions of what makes soap operas a unique form, the history of the genre, current experimentation with transmedia storytelling, the online fan community, and comparisons between daytime dramas and primetime serials from 24 to Friday Night Lights, through a study of Procter & Gamble's As the World Turns.

Subjects

As the World Turns | As the World Turns | gender | gender | television | television | genre conventions | genre conventions | relationships | relationships | drama | drama | student work | student work | advertising | advertising | ratings | ratings | cliffhanger | cliffhanger | fandom | fandom | online interactions | online interactions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT) WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT)

Description

This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction

Subjects

gender | gender | race | race | media studies | media studies | election coverage | election coverage | Sarah Palin | Sarah Palin | Hillary Clinton | Hillary Clinton | music videos | music videos | sexuality | sexuality | television | television | film | film | sports | sports | advertising | advertising | fashion | fashion | fandom | fandom | ethnicity | ethnicity | politics | politics | consumer culture | consumer culture | Saturday Night Live | Saturday Night Live | newspapers | newspapers | Internet | Internet | YouTube | YouTube | blogs | blogs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.603 American Soap Operas (MIT)

Description

The television landscape has changed drastically in the past few years; nowhere is this more prevalent than in the American daytime serial drama, one of the oldest forms of television content. This class examines the history of these "soap operas" and their audiences by focusing on the production, consumption, and media texts of soaps. The class will include discussions of what makes soap operas a unique form, the history of the genre, current experimentation with transmedia storytelling, the online fan community, and comparisons between daytime dramas and primetime serials from 24 to Friday Night Lights, through a study of Procter & Gamble's As the World Turns.

Subjects

As the World Turns | gender | television | genre conventions | relationships | drama | student work | advertising | ratings | cliffhanger | fandom | online interactions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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WGS.111 Gender and Media Studies: Women and the Media (MIT)

Description

This course examines representations of race, class, gender, and sexual identity in the media. We will be considering issues of authorship, spectatorship, (audience) and the ways in which various media content (film, television, print journalism, advertising) enables, facilitates, and challenges these social constructions in society. In addition, we will examine how gender and race affects the production of media, and discuss the impact of new media and digital media and how it has transformed access and participation, moving contemporary media users from a traditional position of "readers" to "writers" and/or commentators. Students will analyze gendered and racialized language and embodiment as it is produced online in blogs and vlogs, avatars, and in the construction

Subjects

gender | race | media studies | election coverage | Sarah Palin | Hillary Clinton | music videos | sexuality | television | film | sports | advertising | fashion | fandom | ethnicity | politics | consumer culture | Saturday Night Live | newspapers | Internet | YouTube | blogs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

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Lecture 23: Creating Sequels

Description

Description: Sequels can improve on the original: fixing problems, adding new features, targeting an established fanbase, etc. This connection can also constrain the sequel concept and discourage new users. Sara Verrilli describes her experiences with the Thief games. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: sequel, intellectual property, franchise, fandom, reboot, target audience, market research, expansion pack, user feedbackTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

sequel | intellectual property | franchise | fandom | reboot | target audience | market research | expansion pack | user feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies-writing/cms-608-game-design-fall-2010/audio-lectures/rss.xml

Attribution

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Lecture 23: Creating Sequels

Description

Description: Sequels can improve on the original: fixing problems, adding new features, targeting an established fanbase, etc. This connection can also constrain the sequel concept and discourage new users. Sara Verrilli describes her experiences with the Thief games. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Sara Verrilli (Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab)Keywords: sequel, intellectual property, franchise, fandom, reboot, target audience, market research, expansion pack, user feedbackTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

sequel | intellectual property | franchise | fandom | reboot | target audience | market research | expansion pack | user feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies/cms-608-game-design-fall-2010/audio-lectures/rss.xml

Attribution

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT)

Description

What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory.

Subjects

popular reading | highbrow culture | lowbrow culture | gender | taste | theory and practice of reading | fanfiction | fandom | Oprah | comics | hypertext | mass-market romance fiction | mega-chain bookstore | reader response theory | Harry Potter | sociology and history of reading | resistance | rare books | fads | social engineering | bestseller

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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CMS.603 American Soap Operas (MIT)

Description

The television landscape has changed drastically in the past few years; nowhere is this more prevalent than in the American daytime serial drama, one of the oldest forms of television content. This class examines the history of these "soap operas" and their audiences by focusing on the production, consumption, and media texts of soaps. The class will include discussions of what makes soap operas a unique form, the history of the genre, current experimentation with transmedia storytelling, the online fan community, and comparisons between daytime dramas and primetime serials from 24 to Friday Night Lights, through a study of Procter & Gamble's As the World Turns.

Subjects

As the World Turns | gender | television | genre conventions | relationships | drama | student work | advertising | ratings | cliffhanger | fandom | online interactions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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