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SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | sex | gender | gender | identity | identity | homosexual | homosexual | transgender | transgender | lesbian | lesbian | third sex | third sex | drag | drag | stonewall | stonewall | queer | queer | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | sexuality | sexuality | medicalization | medicalization | marriage | marriage | feminism | feminism | queer theory | queer theory | trans | trans | genderqueer | genderqueer | essentialism | essentialism | women | women | gender studies | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and consider how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and consider how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

Sex | Sex | gender | gender | identity | identity | homosexual | homosexual | transgender | transgender | lesbian | lesbian | third sex | third sex | drag | drag | stonewall | stonewall | queer | queer | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | sexuality | sexuality | medicalization | medicalization | marriage | marriage | feminism | feminism | queer theory | queer theory | trans | trans | genderqueer | genderqueer | essentialism | essentialism | women | women | gender studies | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | sex | gender | gender | identity | identity | homosexual | homosexual | transgender | transgender | lesbian | lesbian | third sex | third sex | drag | drag | stonewall | stonewall | queer | queer | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | sexuality | sexuality | medicalization | medicalization | marriage | marriage | feminism | feminism | queer theory | queer theory | trans | trans | genderqueer | genderqueer | essentialism | essentialism | women | women | gender studies | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love (MIT) 21L.704 Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love (MIT)

Description

The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure

Subjects

English love sonnets | English love sonnets | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Philip Sidney | Philip Sidney | Edmund Spenser | Edmund Spenser | Mary Wroth | Mary Wroth | sound | sound | rhythm | rhythm | figuration | figuration | poetry | poetry | Petrarchan literary tradition | Petrarchan literary tradition | Francis Petrarch | Francis Petrarch | Sir Thomas Wyatt | Sir Thomas Wyatt | uses of love poetry | uses of love poetry | seduction | seduction | fame | fame | morals | morals | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | conduct manuals | conduct manuals | theories of gender and anatomy | theories of gender and anatomy | narrative poems | narrative poems | pornographic poems | pornographic poems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT) WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality. This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | sex | gender | gender | identity | identity | homosexual | homosexual | transgender | transgender | lesbian | lesbian | third sex | third sex | drag | drag | stonewall | stonewall | queer | queer | masculinity | masculinity | femininity | femininity | sexuality | sexuality | medicalization | medicalization | marriage | marriage | feminism | feminism | queer theory | queer theory | trans | trans | genderqueer | genderqueer | essentialism | essentialism | women | women | gender studies | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-WGS.xml

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Genderisation and Sexuality of the Female Olympic Athlete

Description

Clayton (2002) argue that tennis player Anna Kournikova represents the most powerful symbol of genderisation in sport. Such a supposition is interesting as Kournikova, while successful, never really achieved dominance in her game, instead being better recognised in recent years for her modelling and celebrity profile. The image of Kournikova is, no doubt, a sexualised one.

Subjects

oxb:060111:041dd | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality. cc-by | creative commons | UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | gender | sexuality | equality | femininity | womens sport | female sport | participation | The Olympics Gender and Widening Participation.

License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource.

Site sourced from

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Genderisation and sexuality of the female Olympic athelete

Description

Clayton (2002) argue that tennis player Anna Kournikova represents the most powerful symbol of genderisation in sport. Such a supposition is interesting as Kournikova, while successful, never really achieved dominance in her game, instead being better recognised in recent years for her modelling and celebrity profile. The image of Kournikova is, no doubt, a sexualised one

Subjects

oxb:060111:041dd | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality. cc-by | creative commons | athletics | competition | gender | sexuality | equality | femininity | womens sport | female sport | participation | ukoer | hlst | engscoer | oer | ll2012 | london 2012 | olympics | olympic games | paralympics | paralympic games | learning legacies | jisc | hea | oxford brookes university | hlstoer | ioc | locog | the olympics gender and widening participation | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

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Genderisation and sexuality of the female Olympic athlete

Description

Clayton (2002) argue that tennis player Anna Kournikova represents the most powerful symbol of genderisation in sport. Such a supposition is interesting as Kournikova, while successful, never really achieved dominance in her game, instead being better recognised in recent years for her modelling and celebrity profile. The image of Kournikova is, no doubt, a sexualised one

Subjects

oxb:060111:041dd | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality. cc-by | creative commons | athletics | competition | gender | sexuality | equality | femininity | womens sport | female sport | participation | ukoer | hlst | engscoer | oer | ll2012 | london 2012 | olympics | olympic games | paralympics | paralympic games | learning legacies | jisc | hea | oxford brookes university | hlstoer | ioc | locog | the olympics gender and widening participation | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

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Genderisation and Sexuality of the Female Olympic Athlete

Description

Clayton (2002) argue that tennis player Anna Kournikova represents the most powerful symbol of genderisation in sport. Such a supposition is interesting as Kournikova, while successful, never really achieved dominance in her game, instead being better recognised in recent years for her modelling and celebrity profile. The image of Kournikova is, no doubt, a sexualised one.

Subjects

oxb:060111:041dd | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality. cc-by | creative commons | UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | gender | sexuality | equality | femininity | womens sport | female sport | participation | The Olympics Gender and Widening Participation.

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

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WGS.110 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | gender | identity | homosexual | transgender | lesbian | third sex | drag | stonewall | queer | masculinity | femininity | sexuality | medicalization | marriage | feminism | queer theory | trans | genderqueer | essentialism | women | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

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Genderisation and Sexuality of the Female Olympic Athlete

Description

Clayton (2002) argue that tennis player Anna Kournikova represents the most powerful symbol of genderisation in sport. Such a supposition is interesting as Kournikova, while successful, never really achieved dominance in her game, instead being better recognised in recent years for her modelling and celebrity profile. The image of Kournikova is, no doubt, a sexualised one.

Subjects

oxb:060111:041dd | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality. cc-by | creative commons | UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | gender | sexuality | equality | femininity | womens sport | female sport | participation | The Olympics Gender and Widening Participation.

License

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License, except where otherwise noted within the resource.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

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WGS.SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in film and literature. We begin with a contemporary debate about biology and gender identity, considering its relationship to the historical understanding of sex, gender, and sexual identity. Our investigation continues with the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and considers how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

sex | gender | identity | homosexual | transgender | lesbian | third sex | drag | stonewall | queer | masculinity | femininity | sexuality | medicalization | marriage | feminism | queer theory | trans | genderqueer | essentialism | women | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-WGS.xml

Attribution

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21L.704 Studies in Poetry: Gender and Lyric -- Renaissance Men and Women Writing about Love (MIT)

Description

The core of this seminar will be the great sequences of English love sonnets written by William Shakespeare, Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and Mary Wroth. These poems cover an enormous amount of aesthetic and psychological ground: ranging from the utterly subjective to the entirely public or conventional, from licit to forbidden desires, they might also serve as a manual of experimentation with the resources of sound, rhythm, and figuration in poetry. Around these sequences, we will develop several other contexts, using both Renaissance texts and modern accounts: the Petrarchan literary tradition (poems by Francis Petrarch and Sir Thomas Wyatt); the social, political, and ethical uses of love poetry (seduction, getting famous, influencing policy, elevating morals, compensating for failure

Subjects

English love sonnets | William Shakespeare | Philip Sidney | Edmund Spenser | Mary Wroth | sound | rhythm | figuration | poetry | Petrarchan literary tradition | Francis Petrarch | Sir Thomas Wyatt | uses of love poetry | seduction | fame | morals | masculinity | femininity | conduct manuals | theories of gender and anatomy | narrative poems | pornographic poems

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

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SP.406 Sexual and Gender Identities (MIT)

Description

This course introduces scholarly debates about sexual identities, gender identities and expressions, and sexual orientation and its representation in various media. We begin with an investigation of the theoretical underpinnings of the emerging field of queer studies, from the nineteenth century to the present day, and consider how subsequent work in transgender studies continues to challenge traditional understandings of sex, gender, and sexuality.

Subjects

Sex | gender | identity | homosexual | transgender | lesbian | third sex | drag | stonewall | queer | masculinity | femininity | sexuality | medicalization | marriage | feminism | queer theory | trans | genderqueer | essentialism | women | gender studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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Genderisation and Sexuality of the Female Olympic Athlete

Description

Clayton (2002) argue that tennis player Anna Kournikova represents the most powerful symbol of genderisation in sport. Such a supposition is interesting as Kournikova, while successful, never really achieved dominance in her game, instead being better recognised in recent years for her modelling and celebrity profile. The image of Kournikova is, no doubt, a sexualised one.

Subjects

oxb:060111:041dd | sport | leisure | tourism | hospitality. cc-by | creative commons | UKOER | HLST | ENGSCOER | OER | LL2012 | London 2012 | Olympics | Olympic Games | Paralympics | Paralympic Games | Learning Legacies | JISC | HEA | Oxford Brookes University | HLSTOER | IOC | LOCOG | athletics | competition | gender | sexuality | equality | femininity | womens sport | female sport | participation | The Olympics Gender and Widening Participation.

License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England and Wales License,except where otherwise noted within the resource.

Site sourced from

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/oai?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

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