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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT) 3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electron | electronic properties | electronic properties | magnetism | magnetism | magentic properties | magentic properties | structure | structure | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | phonon | quantum | quantum | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | radiation | radiation | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | polymer | polymer | glass | glass | corrosion | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT) 3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electron | electronic properties | electronic properties | magnetism | magnetism | magentic properties | magentic properties | structure | structure | crystal | crystal | lattice | lattice | energy | energy | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | phonon | quantum | quantum | quantum mechanics | quantum mechanics | radiation | radiation | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | polymer | polymer | glass | glass | corrosion | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT) 3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT)

Description

This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p

Subjects

magnetism | magnetism | electromagnetic | electromagnetic | electromagnetism | electromagnetism | freshman seminar | freshman seminar | magnetic field | magnetic field | Mr. Magnet | Mr. Magnet | levitation | levitation | hard disk | hard disk | magnetoptic | magnetoptic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetism | imaging | imaging | SQUID | SQUID | biomagnetism | biomagnetism | NMR | NMR

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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GdCo2Ge2: Crystal Tetragonal Lattice

Description

CORE-Materials posted a photo: This photograph shows a crystal tetragonal lattice of GdCo2Ge2 grown by dissolving rare earth pieces in arc-melted CoGe flux at ˜1250°C, then slowly cooling down to ˜1100°C. This material has a tetragonal structure and crystals grow as tetragonal plates. Most members of the RCo2Ge2 series are antiferromagnetic with moderately high Neél temperatures and strong magnetic anisotropy. Courtesy of Paul Canfield, Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy.

Subjects

crystal growth rareearth antiferromagnetic tetragonal magneticanisotropy arcmelting cogeflux cdcoge

License

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LuFe6Ge6: Crystal Hexagonal Plates

Description

CORE-Materials posted a photo: This photograph shows crystal hexagonal plates of LuFe6Ge6 grown by dissolving the starting elements in Sn flux at ˜1200°C, then slowly cooling down to 500-800°C. This material has a hexagonal structure and crystals grow as thick hexagonal plates with very smooth surfaces. The iron sublattice is known to order antiferromagnetically at ˜150°C, but the rare earth sublattices in the RFe6Ge6 series are not affected by this ordering and behave independently. Courtesy of Paul Canfield, Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy.

Subjects

crystal hexagonal growth rareearth antiferromagnetic fluxgrow lufege

License

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TbFe2Ge2: Crystal Tetragonal Plate

Description

CORE-Materials posted a photo: This photograph shows a crystal tetragonal plate of TbFe2Ge2 grown by dissolving the starting elements in Sn flux at ~1200C, then slowly cooling down to 500-800C. This material has a tetragonal structure and crystals grow as thin plates with very smooth surfaces. Iron is non-magnetic in the RFe2Ge2 series and most rare earths order antiferromagnetically, showing extreme magnetic anisotropy. Courtesy of Paul Canfield, Ames Laboratory, US Department of Energy.

Subjects

crystal growth rareearth antiferromagnetic tetragonal snflux magneticanisotropy tbfege

License

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electronic properties | magnetism | magentic properties | structure | crystal | lattice | energy | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | quantum | quantum mechanics | radiation | battery | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | polymer | glass | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.014 Materials Laboratory (MIT)

Description

This course is a required sophomore subject in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, designed to be taken in conjunction with the core lecture subject 3.012 Fundamentals of Materials Science and Engineering. The laboratory subject combines experiments illustrating the principles of quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and structure with intensive oral and written technical communication practice. Specific topics include: experimental exploration of the connections between energetics, bonding and structure of materials, and application of these principles in instruments for materials characterization; demonstration of the wave-like nature of electrons; hands-on experience with techniques to quantify energy (DSC), bonding (XPS, AES, FTIR, UV/Vis and force spectroscopy), and degre

Subjects

electron | electronic properties | magnetism | magentic properties | structure | crystal | lattice | energy | thermodynamics | differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) | x-ray diffraction (XRD) | scanning probe microscopy (AFM | STM) | scanning electron microscopy (SEM) | UV/Vis | Raman spectroscopy | FTIR spectroscopy | x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) | vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) | dynamic light scattering (DLS) | phonon | quantum | quantum mechanics | radiation | battery | fuel cell | ferromagnetism | ferromagnetic | polymer | glass | corrosion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.A08 Attraction and Repulsion: The Magic of Magnets (MIT)

Description

This Freshman Advising Seminar surveys the many applications of magnets and magnetism. To the Chinese and Greeks of ancient times, the attractive and repulsive forces between magnets must have seemed magical indeed. Through the ages, miraculous curative powers have been attributed to magnets, and magnets have been used by illusionists to produce "magical" effects. Magnets guided ships in the Age of Exploration and generated the electrical industry in the 19th century. Today they store information and entertainment on disks and tapes, and produce sound in speakers, images on TV screens, rotation in motors, and levitation in high-speed trains. Students visit various MIT projects related to magnets (including superconducting electromagnets) and read about and discuss the history, legends, p

Subjects

magnetism | electromagnetic | electromagnetism | freshman seminar | magnetic field | Mr. Magnet | levitation | hard disk | magnetoptic | ferromagnetic | ferromagnetism | imaging | SQUID | biomagnetism | NMR

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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