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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers. This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005. Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.044 Materials Processing (MIT) 3.044 Materials Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is focused on physical understanding of materials processing, and the scaling laws that govern process speed, volume, and material quality. In particular, this course will cover the transport of heat and matter as these topics apply to materials processing. This course is focused on physical understanding of materials processing, and the scaling laws that govern process speed, volume, and material quality. In particular, this course will cover the transport of heat and matter as these topics apply to materials processing.

Subjects

materials processing | materials processing | heat conduction | heat conduction | heat transfer | heat transfer | Biot number | Biot number | glass fibers | glass fibers | thermal spray | thermal spray | 2D analysis | 2D analysis | friction welding | friction welding | radiation | radiation | black bodies | black bodies | emessivity | emessivity | solidification | solidification | sand casting | sand casting | lost foam | lost foam | molds | molds | binary solidification | binary solidification | microstructures | microstructures | fluid flow | fluid flow | glass production | glass production | Pilkington glass | Pilkington glass | drag force | drag force | Newtonian | Newtonian | non-Newtonian | non-Newtonian | blow molding | blow molding | compressive forming | compressive forming | powder | powder | sintering | sintering | slurry | slurry | and colloid processing | and colloid processing | steel making | steel making | electronics manufacturing | electronics manufacturing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.725 Algebraic Geometry (MIT) 18.725 Algebraic Geometry (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field. It also analyzes the relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties. This course covers the fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field. It also analyzes the relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties.

Subjects

algebraic varieties over algebraically closed field | algebraic varieties over algebraically closed field | complex algebraic varieties | complex algebraic varieties | complex analytic varieties | complex analytic varieties | curves and surfaces | curves and surfaces | irreducible components | irreducible components | projective space | projective space | topological diversion | topological diversion | sheaves | sheaves | presheaves | presheaves | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | fibers | fibers | morphisms | morphisms | varieties | varieties | projective varieties | projective varieties | applications | applications | dimension | dimension | krull dimension | krull dimension | completeness | completeness | complex topology | complex topology | Chow's lemma | Chow's lemma | analytic spaces | analytic spaces | curves | curves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.630 Electromagnetic Theory (MIT) 6.630 Electromagnetic Theory (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. Media player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .mpeg files found on this course site. The latest version 6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. Media player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .mpeg files found on this course site. The latest version

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | Maxwell | Maxwell | polarization | polarization | dipole antennas | dipole antennas | wireless communications | wireless communications | forces | forces | energy | energy | phase matching | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | optical fibers | transmission line theory | transmission line theory | circuit | circuit | antennas | antennas | equivalent principle | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | propagation | propagation | guidance | guidance | radiation | radiation | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.630 Electromagnetics (MIT) 6.630 Electromagnetics (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves. 6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetics | electromagnetics | Maxwell | Maxwell | polarization | polarization | dipole antennas | dipole antennas | wireless communications | wireless communications | forces | forces | energy | energy | phase matching | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | optical fibers | transmission line theory | transmission line theory | circuit | circuit | antennas | antennas | equivalent principle | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | electrodynamics | propagation | propagation | guidance | guidance | radiation | radiation | electromagnetic waves | electromagnetic waves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.071 Amorphous Materials (MIT) 3.071 Amorphous Materials (MIT)

Description

This course discusses the fundamental material science behind amorphous solids, or non-crystalline materials. It covers formation of amorphous solids; amorphous structures and their electrical and optical properties; and characterization methods and technical applications. This course discusses the fundamental material science behind amorphous solids, or non-crystalline materials. It covers formation of amorphous solids; amorphous structures and their electrical and optical properties; and characterization methods and technical applications.

Subjects

glass | glass | amorphous solid | amorphous solid | mechanical and optical properties | mechanical and optical properties | metastable | metastable | silica | silica | ideal crystals | ideal crystals | network formers | network formers | modifiers | modifiers | intermediates | intermediates | alkali silicate glass | alkali silicate glass | amorphous semiconductors | amorphous semiconductors | metallic glass | metallic glass | glass forming theory | glass forming theory | crystallization | crystallization | thermodynamics of nucleation | thermodynamics of nucleation | potential energy landscape | potential energy landscape | Zachariasen’s rules | Zachariasen’s rules | kinetic theory | kinetic theory | network topology theory | network topology theory | laboratory glass transition | laboratory glass transition | glass forming ability parmaters | glass forming ability parmaters | performance metrics | performance metrics | GST phase change alloy | GST phase change alloy | PCM | PCM | phase change memory | phase change memory | data storage | data storage | pitch drop experiment | pitch drop experiment | temperature dependence | temperature dependence | viscous flow | viscous flow | stron v. fragile liquids | stron v. fragile liquids | non- newtonian behavior | non- newtonian behavior | viscometry | viscometry | linear elasticity | linear elasticity | Newtonian viscosity | Newtonian viscosity | elasticity | elasticity | viscosity | viscosity | glass shaping | glass shaping | relaxation | relaxation | mechanical properties | mechanical properties | glass stregthening | glass stregthening | electrical properties | electrical properties | transport properties | transport properties | macroelectronics | macroelectronics | optical properties | optical properties | optical fibers | optical fibers | waveguides | waveguides | amorphous state | amorphous state

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.542J Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (MIT) HST.542J Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates on the application of the principles of energy and mass flow to major human organ systems. It discusses mechanisms of regulation and homeostasis. It also discusses anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological features of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. There is emphasis on those systems, features, and devices that are most illuminated by the methods of physical sciences. This course elaborates on the application of the principles of energy and mass flow to major human organ systems. It discusses mechanisms of regulation and homeostasis. It also discusses anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological features of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. There is emphasis on those systems, features, and devices that are most illuminated by the methods of physical sciences.

Subjects

electrocardiogram | electrocardiogram | cardiovascular system | cardiovascular system | cardiovascular physiology | cardiovascular physiology | electrophysiology | electrophysiology | myocardial cells | myocardial cells | electrocardiography | electrocardiography | physiological fluid mechanics | physiological fluid mechanics | respiratory physiology | respiratory physiology | renal physiology | renal physiology | quantitative physiology | quantitative physiology | pulmonary mechanics | pulmonary mechanics | heart | heart | arrhythmia | arrhythmia | pulmonary modeling | pulmonary modeling | clinical electrocardiography | clinical electrocardiography | ECG | ECG | EKG | EKG | ischemia | ischemia | infarction | infarction | vector cardiogram | vector cardiogram | purkinje fibers | purkinje fibers | QRS waveform | QRS waveform | tachycardia | tachycardia | action potential | action potential | depolarization | depolarization | afterdepolarization | afterdepolarization | total lung capacity | total lung capacity | systolic | systolic | diastolic | diastolic | residual volume | residual volume | vital capacity | vital capacity | HST.542 | HST.542 | 2.792 | 2.792 | 20.371J20.371 | 20.371J20.371 | 6.022 | 6.022

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | objects of material culture | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | materials processing | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | ceramics | fibers | ideology | values | anthropology | archaeology | history | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | objects of material culture | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | materials processing | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | ceramics | fibers | ideology | values | anthropology | archaeology | history | culture

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005.

Subjects

linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.044 Materials Processing (MIT)

Description

This course is focused on physical understanding of materials processing, and the scaling laws that govern process speed, volume, and material quality. In particular, this course will cover the transport of heat and matter as these topics apply to materials processing.

Subjects

materials processing | heat conduction | heat transfer | Biot number | glass fibers | thermal spray | 2D analysis | friction welding | radiation | black bodies | emessivity | solidification | sand casting | lost foam | molds | binary solidification | microstructures | fluid flow | glass production | Pilkington glass | drag force | Newtonian | non-Newtonian | blow molding | compressive forming | powder | sintering | slurry | and colloid processing | steel making | electronics manufacturing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.630 Electromagnetics (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetics | Maxwell | polarization | dipole antennas | wireless communications | forces | energy | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | transmission line theory | circuit | antennas | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | propagation | guidance | radiation | electromagnetic waves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.725 Algebraic Geometry (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental notions and results about algebraic varieties over an algebraically closed field. It also analyzes the relations between complex algebraic varieties and complex analytic varieties.

Subjects

algebraic varieties over algebraically closed field | complex algebraic varieties | complex analytic varieties | curves and surfaces | irreducible components | projective space | topological diversion | sheaves | presheaves | algebraic geometry | fibers | morphisms | varieties | projective varieties | applications | dimension | krull dimension | completeness | complex topology | Chow's lemma | analytic spaces | curves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.071 Amorphous Materials (MIT)

Description

This course discusses the fundamental material science behind amorphous solids, or non-crystalline materials. It covers formation of amorphous solids; amorphous structures and their electrical and optical properties; and characterization methods and technical applications.

Subjects

glass | amorphous solid | mechanical and optical properties | metastable | silica | ideal crystals | network formers | modifiers | intermediates | alkali silicate glass | amorphous semiconductors | metallic glass | glass forming theory | crystallization | thermodynamics of nucleation | potential energy landscape | ?s rules | kinetic theory | network topology theory | laboratory glass transition | glass forming ability parmaters | performance metrics | GST phase change alloy | PCM | phase change memory | data storage | pitch drop experiment | temperature dependence | viscous flow | stron v. fragile liquids | non- newtonian behavior | viscometry | linear elasticity | Newtonian viscosity | elasticity | viscosity | glass shaping | relaxation | mechanical properties | glass stregthening | electrical properties | transport properties | macroelectronics | optical properties | optical fibers | waveguides | amorphous state

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.630 Electromagnetics (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.

Subjects

electromagnetics | Maxwell | polarization | dipole antennas | wireless communications | forces | energy | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | transmission line theory | circuit | antennas | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | propagation | guidance | radiation | electromagnetic waves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.630 Electromagnetic Theory (MIT)

Description

6.630 is an introductory subject on electromagnetics, emphasizing fundamental concepts and applications of Maxwell equations. Topics covered include: polarization, dipole antennas, wireless communications, forces and energy, phase matching, dielectric waveguides and optical fibers, transmission line theory and circuit concepts, antennas, and equivalent principle. Examples deal with electrodynamics, propagation, guidance, and radiation of electromagnetic waves.Technical RequirementsMATLAB® software is required to run the .m files found on this course site. Media player software, such as QuickTime® Player, RealOne™ Player, or Windows Media® Player, is required to run the .mpeg files found on this course site. The latest version

Subjects

electromagnetics | Maxwell | polarization | dipole antennas | wireless communications | forces | energy | phase matching | dielectric waveguides | optical fibers | transmission line theory | circuit | antennas | equivalent principle | electrodynamics | propagation | guidance | radiation | electromagnetic waves

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.542J Quantitative Physiology: Organ Transport Systems (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates on the application of the principles of energy and mass flow to major human organ systems. It discusses mechanisms of regulation and homeostasis. It also discusses anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological features of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems. There is emphasis on those systems, features, and devices that are most illuminated by the methods of physical sciences.

Subjects

electrocardiogram | cardiovascular system | cardiovascular physiology | electrophysiology | myocardial cells | electrocardiography | physiological fluid mechanics | respiratory physiology | renal physiology | quantitative physiology | pulmonary mechanics | heart | arrhythmia | pulmonary modeling | clinical electrocardiography | ECG | EKG | ischemia | infarction | vector cardiogram | purkinje fibers | QRS waveform | tachycardia | action potential | depolarization | afterdepolarization | total lung capacity | systolic | diastolic | residual volume | vital capacity | HST.542 | 2.792 | 20.371J20.371 | 6.022

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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