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21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT) 21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT)

Description

Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy). Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy).

Subjects

writing | writing | creative writing | creative writing | fiction | fiction | fiction writing | fiction writing | writing fiction | writing fiction | genre fiction | genre fiction | genre | genre | genres | genres | fantasy | fantasy | fantasy writing | fantasy writing | science fiction | science fiction | mystery | mystery | historical fiction | historical fiction | preternatural romance | preternatural romance | horror | horror | steampunk | steampunk | workshop | workshop | revision | revision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT)

Description

Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy).

Subjects

writing | creative writing | fiction | fiction writing | writing fiction | genre fiction | genre | genres | fantasy | fantasy writing | science fiction | mystery | historical fiction | preternatural romance | horror | steampunk | workshop | revision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT)

Description

Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy).

Subjects

writing | creative writing | fiction | fiction writing | writing fiction | genre fiction | genre | genres | fantasy | fantasy writing | science fiction | mystery | historical fiction | preternatural romance | horror | steampunk | workshop | revision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.759 Writing Science Fiction (MIT) 21W.759 Writing Science Fiction (MIT)

Description

This class will focus on the craft of writing genre science fiction. Students write and read science fiction and analyze and discuss stories written for the class. For the first eight weeks, readings in contemporary science fiction accompany lectures and formal writing assignments intended to illuminate various aspects of writing craft as well as the particular problems of writing science fiction. The rest of the term is given to roundtable workshops on student's stories. This class will focus on the craft of writing genre science fiction. Students write and read science fiction and analyze and discuss stories written for the class. For the first eight weeks, readings in contemporary science fiction accompany lectures and formal writing assignments intended to illuminate various aspects of writing craft as well as the particular problems of writing science fiction. The rest of the term is given to roundtable workshops on student's stories.

Subjects

writing | writing | scifi | scifi | sci fi | sci fi | science fiction | science fiction | fantasy | fantasy | fiction | fiction | literature | literature | genre | genre | workshop | workshop | speculative fiction | speculative fiction | subgenre | subgenre | world building | world building | worldbuilding | worldbuilding | protagonist | protagonist | characters | characters | future | future | theme | theme | futurist | futurist | publishing | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Julian Thompson on Wilkie Collins

Description

Dr. Julian Thompson considers how Wilkie Collins's fiction was pioneering across a variety of genres, including detective fiction and gothic thrillers. He also considers Collins's progressive political outlook, picks out his 'great' work, and indicates how Collins may have influenced Charles Dickens. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

#greatwriters | detective fiction | political | fiction | gothic | dickens | Wilkie Collins | #greatwriters | detective fiction | political | fiction | gothic | dickens | Wilkie Collins

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.022.03 Writing and Experience: Reading and Writing Autobiography (MIT) 21W.022.03 Writing and Experience: Reading and Writing Autobiography (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing in this course will focus on the art of self-narrative or autobiographical writing. Such writing can be crafted in the form of a longer autobiography or of separate, shorter autobiographically-inspired essays. The various forms of autobiographical narrative can both reflect on personal experience and comment on larger issues in society.This course explores, through reading and writing, what it means to construct a sense of self-and a life narrative-in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. What does it mean to see ourselves as embodying particular ethical values or belonging to a certain ethnic, racial, national or religious group(s)? How do we imagine ourselves within larger "family narrative(s)" The reading and writing in this course will focus on the art of self-narrative or autobiographical writing. Such writing can be crafted in the form of a longer autobiography or of separate, shorter autobiographically-inspired essays. The various forms of autobiographical narrative can both reflect on personal experience and comment on larger issues in society.This course explores, through reading and writing, what it means to construct a sense of self-and a life narrative-in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. What does it mean to see ourselves as embodying particular ethical values or belonging to a certain ethnic, racial, national or religious group(s)? How do we imagine ourselves within larger "family narrative(s)"

Subjects

writing | writing | autobiography | autobiography | non-fiction | non-fiction | fiction | fiction | essay | essay | experience | experience | memoir | memoir

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT) 21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

This is a course focused on the literary genre of the essay, that wide-ranging, elastic, and currently very popular form that attracts not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers, poets, scientists, physicians, and others to write in the form, and readers of every stripe to read it. Some say we are living in era in which the essay is enjoying a renaissance; certainly essays, both short and long, are at present easier to get published than are short stories or novels, and essays are featured regularly and prominently in the mainstream press (both magazines and newspapers) and on the New York Times bestseller books list. But the essay has a history, too, a long one, which goes back at least to the sixteenth-century French writer Montaigne, generally considered the progenitor of the This is a course focused on the literary genre of the essay, that wide-ranging, elastic, and currently very popular form that attracts not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers, poets, scientists, physicians, and others to write in the form, and readers of every stripe to read it. Some say we are living in era in which the essay is enjoying a renaissance; certainly essays, both short and long, are at present easier to get published than are short stories or novels, and essays are featured regularly and prominently in the mainstream press (both magazines and newspapers) and on the New York Times bestseller books list. But the essay has a history, too, a long one, which goes back at least to the sixteenth-century French writer Montaigne, generally considered the progenitor of the

Subjects

Writing | Writing | reading | reading | essay | essay | iterary genre | iterary genre | nonfiction writers | nonfiction writers | fiction writers | fiction writers | poets | poets | scientists | scientists | physicians | physicians | Didion | Didion | Bacon | Bacon | White | White | E.B. | E.B. | Walker | Walker | Oates | Oates | Orwell | Orwell | Gould | Gould | Wolfe | Wolfe | Woolf | Woolf | Eiseley | Eiseley | White | E.B. | White | E.B.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT) 21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT)

Description

What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory. What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory.

Subjects

popular reading | popular reading | highbrow culture | highbrow culture | lowbrow culture | lowbrow culture | gender | gender | taste | taste | theory and practice of reading | theory and practice of reading | fanfiction | fanfiction | fandom | fandom | Oprah | Oprah | comics | comics | hypertext | hypertext | mass-market romance fiction | mass-market romance fiction | mega-chain bookstore | mega-chain bookstore | reader response theory | reader response theory | Harry Potter | Harry Potter | sociology and history of reading | sociology and history of reading | resistance | resistance | rare books | rare books | fads | fads | social engineering | social engineering | bestseller | bestseller

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.010 Introduction to European and Latin American Fiction (MIT) 21G.010 Introduction to European and Latin American Fiction (MIT)

Description

This subject serves as a broad introduction to the field of European and Latin American fiction. It is taught in an historical manner—beginning with the first picaresque novel, Lazarillo de Tormes, and ending with contemporary European fiction. It is designed to help students acquire a general understanding of major fictional modes-from 18th century epistolary fiction, Liaisons dangereuses, to 20th century avant-garde fiction: Cosmicomicsi and Aura. Attention is paid not only to the literary movements these works represent, but also to the subtle interplay of history, geography, language and cultural norms that gave rise to specific literary forms. While the reading load is heavy, the books are compelling. This subject serves as a broad introduction to the field of European and Latin American fiction. It is taught in an historical manner—beginning with the first picaresque novel, Lazarillo de Tormes, and ending with contemporary European fiction. It is designed to help students acquire a general understanding of major fictional modes-from 18th century epistolary fiction, Liaisons dangereuses, to 20th century avant-garde fiction: Cosmicomicsi and Aura. Attention is paid not only to the literary movements these works represent, but also to the subtle interplay of history, geography, language and cultural norms that gave rise to specific literary forms. While the reading load is heavy, the books are compelling.

Subjects

European and Latin American fiction | European and Latin American fiction | fictional modes | fictional modes | literary forms | literary forms | communication intensive | communication intensive

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.759 Writing Science Fiction (MIT)

Description

This class will focus on the craft of writing genre science fiction. Students write and read science fiction and analyze and discuss stories written for the class. For the first eight weeks, readings in contemporary science fiction accompany lectures and formal writing assignments intended to illuminate various aspects of writing craft as well as the particular problems of writing science fiction. The rest of the term is given to roundtable workshops on student's stories.

Subjects

writing | scifi | sci fi | science fiction | fantasy | fiction | literature | genre | workshop | speculative fiction | subgenre | world building | worldbuilding | protagonist | characters | future | theme | futurist | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Approaching prose fiction Approaching prose fiction

Description

Do you want to get more out of your reading? This free course, Approaching prose fiction, is designed to develop the analytical skills you need for a more in-depth study of literary texts. You will learn about narrative events and perspectives, the setting of novels, types of characterisation and genre. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as Approaching prose fiction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Do you want to get more out of your reading? This free course, Approaching prose fiction, is designed to develop the analytical skills you need for a more in-depth study of literary texts. You will learn about narrative events and perspectives, the setting of novels, types of characterisation and genre. First published on Fri, 05 Feb 2016 as Approaching prose fiction. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Literature | Literature | art | art | fiction | fiction | novels | novels | A210_2. | A210_2.

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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The turn of the screw The turn of the screw

Description

ebook version of The turn of the screw ebook version of The turn of the screw

Subjects

kind | kind | Fiction -- Great Britain -- 19th century | Fiction -- Great Britain -- 19th century | Occult fiction -- Great Britain -- 19th century | Occult fiction -- Great Britain -- 19th century | Ghost stories -- Great Britain -- 19th century | Ghost stories -- Great Britain -- 19th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

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Curious, if true Curious, if true

Description

ebook version of Curious, if true ebook version of Curious, if true

Subjects

kind | kind | English fiction -- 19th century | English fiction -- 19th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Tess of the d'Urbervilles Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Description

ebook version of Tess of the d'Urbervilles ebook version of Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Subjects

kind | kind | English fiction -- 19th century | English fiction -- 19th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The well of Pen-Morfa The well of Pen-Morfa

Description

ebook version of The well of Pen-Morfa ebook version of The well of Pen-Morfa

Subjects

kind | kind | English fiction -- 19th century | English fiction -- 19th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.461 Advanced Macroeconomics I (MIT) 14.461 Advanced Macroeconomics I (MIT)

Description

14.461 is an advanced course in macroeconomics that seeks to bring students to the research frontier. The course is divided into two sections. The first half is taught by Prof. Iván Werning and covers topics such as how to formulate and solve optimal problems. Students will study fiscal and monetary policy, among other issues. The second half, taught by Prof. George-Marios Angeletos, covers recent work on multiple equilibria, global games, and informational fictions. 14.461 is an advanced course in macroeconomics that seeks to bring students to the research frontier. The course is divided into two sections. The first half is taught by Prof. Iván Werning and covers topics such as how to formulate and solve optimal problems. Students will study fiscal and monetary policy, among other issues. The second half, taught by Prof. George-Marios Angeletos, covers recent work on multiple equilibria, global games, and informational fictions.

Subjects

macroeconomics | macroeconomics | macroeconomic theory | macroeconomic theory | policy | policy | fiscal policy | fiscal policy | monetary policy | monetary policy | research | research | business cycles | business cycles | financial crisis | financial crisis | global games | global games | multiple equilibria | multiple equilibria | informational fictions | informational fictions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.292 Writing Workshop (MIT) SP.292 Writing Workshop (MIT)

Description

MIT students are challenged daily to solve for x, to complete four problem sets, two papers, and prepare for an exam worth 30% of their grade... all in one night. When they do stop to breathe, it's for a shower or a meal. What does this have to do with creative writing? Everything. Creative writing and MIT go together better than you might imagine. MIT students are challenged daily to solve for x, to complete four problem sets, two papers, and prepare for an exam worth 30% of their grade... all in one night. When they do stop to breathe, it's for a shower or a meal. What does this have to do with creative writing? Everything. Creative writing and MIT go together better than you might imagine.

Subjects

creative writing | creative writing | writing | writing | workshop | workshop | reading | reading | reflection | reflection | revision | revision | microfiction | microfiction | essay | essay | satire | satire | contributors' note | contributors' note | OuLiPo | OuLiPo

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT) 21G.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT)

Description

This course deals with the vast changes in Spanish social, political, and cultural life that have taken place since the death of Franco. It examines the new freedom from censorship; the re-emergence of strong movements for regional autonomy: the Basque region and Catalonia; the new cinema including Almodóvar and Saura; educational reforms instituted by the socialist government, and the fiction of Carme Riera and Terenci Moix. Special emphasis is placed on the emergence of mass media as a vehicle for expression in Spain. Consideration is given to the changes wrought by Spain's acceptance into the European Community. Materials include magazines, newspapers, films, fiction and Amando de Miguel's Los Españoles. This course is taught in Spanish. This course deals with the vast changes in Spanish social, political, and cultural life that have taken place since the death of Franco. It examines the new freedom from censorship; the re-emergence of strong movements for regional autonomy: the Basque region and Catalonia; the new cinema including Almodóvar and Saura; educational reforms instituted by the socialist government, and the fiction of Carme Riera and Terenci Moix. Special emphasis is placed on the emergence of mass media as a vehicle for expression in Spain. Consideration is given to the changes wrought by Spain's acceptance into the European Community. Materials include magazines, newspapers, films, fiction and Amando de Miguel's Los Españoles. This course is taught in Spanish.

Subjects

Spain | Spain | 1977 | 1977 | present | present | Spanish | Spanish | social | social | political | political | cultural life | cultural life | changes | changes | Franco | Franco | censorship | censorship | regional autonomy | regional autonomy | Basque | Basque | Catalonia | Catalonia | Almod?var | Almod?var | Saura | Saura | educational reforms | educational reforms | socialist | socialist | Carme Riera | Carme Riera | Terenci Moix | Terenci Moix | mass media | mass media | European Community | European Community | magazines | magazines | newspapers | newspapers | films | films | fiction | fiction | Amando de Miguel | Amando de Miguel | Los Espa?oles | Los Espa?oles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.110J Design Across Scales, Disciplines and Problem Contexts (MIT) 4.110J Design Across Scales, Disciplines and Problem Contexts (MIT)

Description

This course explores the reciprocal relationships among design, science, and technology by covering a wide range of topics including industrial design, architecture, visualization and perception, design computation, material ecology, and environmental design and sustainability. Students will examine how transformations in science and technology have influenced design thinking and vice versa, as well as develop methodologies for design research and collaborate on design solutions to interdisciplinary problems. This course explores the reciprocal relationships among design, science, and technology by covering a wide range of topics including industrial design, architecture, visualization and perception, design computation, material ecology, and environmental design and sustainability. Students will examine how transformations in science and technology have influenced design thinking and vice versa, as well as develop methodologies for design research and collaborate on design solutions to interdisciplinary problems.

Subjects

4.110 | 4.110 | MAS.330 | MAS.330 | design | design | media | media | animation | animation | image | image | data | data | visualization | visualization | representation | representation | database | database | Processing | Processing | fabrication | fabrication | technology | technology | systems | systems | model | model | AI | AI | intelligence | intelligence | programming | programming | optimization | optimization | machine | machine | play | play | game | game | utopia | utopia | future | future | dystopia | dystopia | science fiction | science fiction | environment | environment | growth | growth | organization | organization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The macaroni. A comedy: As it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in York. The macaroni. A comedy: As it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in York.

Description

ebook version of The macaroni. A comedy: As it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in York. ebook version of The macaroni. A comedy: As it is performed at the Theatre-Royal in York.

Subjects

kind | kind | English drama (Comedy) | English drama (Comedy) | English wit and humor | English wit and humor | English fiction | English fiction | Comedies -- 18th century. -- England | Comedies -- 18th century. -- England | Plays -- 18th century. -- England | Plays -- 18th century. -- England | ECCO | ECCO | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts. Writing About Literature aims: To increase students' pleasure and skill in reading literary texts and in writing and communicating about them. To introduce students to different literary forms (poetry, fiction, drama) and some tools of literary study (close reading, research, theoretical models). To allow students to get to know a single writer deeply. To encourage students to make independent decisions about their reading by exploring and reporting back on authors whose works they enjoy. The syllabus includes an eclectic mix: William Shakespeare, Herman Melville, Henry James, Michael Frayn, and Jhumpa Lahiri. We'll explore different ways of approaching the questions readers have about each of these texts.

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | reading | reading | writing | writing | literary criticism | literary criticism | literary texts | literary texts | Dickinson | Dickinson | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Hughes | Hughes | Chekhov | Chekhov | Joyce | Joyce | Walker | Walker | Melville | Melville | Morrison | Morrison | analytical skills | analytical skills | essays | essays | analysis | analysis | communication | communication | poetry | poetry | fiction | fiction | drama | drama | Lahiri | Lahiri | Frayn | Frayn | textuality | textuality | conceptualization | conceptualization | film | film | media | media

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The war of the worlds The war of the worlds

Description

ebook version of The war of the worlds ebook version of The war of the worlds

Subjects

kind | kind | English fiction -- 19th century | English fiction -- 19th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Far from the madding crowd Far from the madding crowd

Description

ebook version of Far from the madding crowd ebook version of Far from the madding crowd

Subjects

kind | kind | English fiction -- 19th century | English fiction -- 19th century | text | text | CC BY-SA | CC BY-SA

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century. This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century.

Subjects

historical writing | historical writing | politics | politics | social | social | culture | culture | demographics | demographics | biography | biography | environment | environment | comparative literature | comparative literature | film | film | fiction | fiction | memoir | memoir | methodology | methodology | political | political | cultural | cultural | demographic | demographic | biographical | biographical | comparative | comparative | historical films | historical films | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | methods | methods | historians | historians | interpretation | interpretation | archives | archives | archivists | archivists | archival findings | archival findings | history | history | national identity | national identity | philosophy of history | philosophy of history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.022.03 Writing and Experience: Reading and Writing Autobiography (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing in this course will focus on the art of self-narrative or autobiographical writing. Such writing can be crafted in the form of a longer autobiography or of separate, shorter autobiographically-inspired essays. The various forms of autobiographical narrative can both reflect on personal experience and comment on larger issues in society.This course explores, through reading and writing, what it means to construct a sense of self-and a life narrative-in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. What does it mean to see ourselves as embodying particular ethical values or belonging to a certain ethnic, racial, national or religious group(s)? How do we imagine ourselves within larger "family narrative(s)"

Subjects

writing | autobiography | non-fiction | fiction | essay | experience | memoir

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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