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3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | stress transformation | elasticity | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | Case studies | materials selection | materials selection | bicycle frames | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT) 21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation. This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | China | rice | rice | bowl | bowl | Chinese | Chinese | East Asia | East Asia | ordinary people | ordinary people | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | twentieth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | personal narratives | primary sources | primary sources | films | films | textbook | textbook | individual | individual | family | family | lives | lives | change | change | modern | modern | readings | readings | discussions | discussions | political events | political events | daily | daily | decisions | decisions | large-scale | large-scale | social | social | transformation | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.191 | 21F.991 | 21F.991

License

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3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT) 3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT)

Description

This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials. This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials.

Subjects

Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | Magnetostatics | Magnetostatics | magnetism | magnetism | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic anisotropy | magnetic anisotropy | reversible and irreversible magnetization | reversible and irreversible magnetization | hard and soft magnetic materials | hard and soft magnetic materials | magnetic recording | magnetic recording | thin films | thin films | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | amorphous magnetic materials | amorphous magnetic materials

License

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21H.560 Smashing the Iron Rice Bowl: Chinese East Asia (MIT)

Description

This subject examines the experiences of ordinary Chinese people as they lived through the tumultuous changes of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We look at personal narratives, primary sources, films alongside a textbook to think about how individual and family lives connect with the broader processes of change in modern China. In the readings and discussions, you should focus on how major political events have an impact on the characters' daily lives, and how the decisions they make cause large-scale social transformation.

Subjects

China; rice; bowl; Chinese; East Asia; ordinary people; nineteenth century; twentieth century; personal narratives; primary sources; films; textbook; individual; family; lives; change; modern; readings; discussions; political events; daily; decisions; large-scale; social; transformation. | China | rice | bowl | Chinese | East Asia | ordinary people | nineteenth century | twentieth century | personal narratives | primary sources | films | textbook | individual | family | lives | change | modern | readings | discussions | political events | daily | decisions | large-scale | social | transformation | 21F.191 | 21F.991

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe This class surveys a range of comic texts from different media, the cultures that produced them, and various theories of comedy. Authors and directors studied may include Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Moliere, Austen, Chaplin.This subject laughs and then wonders how and why and what's so funny. Sometimes it laughs out loud. Sometimes it spills into satire (and asks, what's the difference?). Sometimes it doesn't laugh at all, but some resolution seems affirmative or structurally functional, in some satisfying way (by what categoriy is Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet a "comedy"? how can Dante call his vision of an organized universe a "Comedy"?). We read jokes, literary texts, tales, satirical paintings, and films, and we address a few theories about how comedy works (doe

Subjects

Comedy | Comedy | Drama | Drama | Writing | Writing | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Twain | Twain | Wilde | Wilde | Brecht | Brecht | Nabokov | Nabokov | Heller | Heller | Chaucer | Chaucer | Milton | Milton | Allegory | Allegory | Satire | Satire | comic | comic | funny | funny | jokes | jokes | literature | literature | tales | tales | satirical paintnigs | satirical paintnigs | films | films | comedies | comedies

License

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3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT) 3.22 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications. Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, fracture and fatigue of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. We will cover special topics in mechanical behavior for material systems of your choice, with reference to current research and publications.

Subjects

Phenomenology | Phenomenology | mechanical behavior | mechanical behavior | material structure | material structure | deformation | deformation | failure | failure | elasticity | elasticity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | creep | creep | fracture | fracture | fatigue | fatigue | metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | thin films | thin films | carbon nanotubes | carbon nanotubes | battery materials | battery materials | superelastic alloys | superelastic alloys | defect nucleation | defect nucleation | student projects | student projects | viral capsides | viral capsides

License

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3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT) 3.225 Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Materials (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others. This course covers the fundamental concepts that determine the electrical, optical, magnetic and mechanical properties of metals, semiconductors, ceramics and polymers. The roles of bonding, structure (crystalline, defect, energy band and microstructure) and composition in influencing and controlling physical properties are discussed. Also included are case studies drawn from a variety of applications: semiconductor diodes and optical detectors, sensors, thin films, biomaterials, composites and cellular materials, and others.

Subjects

metals | metals | semiconductors | semiconductors | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | bonding | bonding | structure | structure | energy band | energy band | microstructure | microstructure | composition | composition | semiconductor diodes | semiconductor diodes | optical detectors | optical detectors | sensors | sensors | thin films | thin films | biomaterials | biomaterials | cellular materials | cellular materials | magnetism | magnetism | polarity | polarity | viscoelasticity | viscoelasticity | plasticity | plasticity | fracture | fracture | materials selection | materials selection

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT) 21G.740 The New Spain: 1977-Present (MIT)

Description

This course deals with the vast changes in Spanish social, political, and cultural life that have taken place since the death of Franco. It examines the new freedom from censorship; the re-emergence of strong movements for regional autonomy: the Basque region and Catalonia; the new cinema including Almodóvar and Saura; educational reforms instituted by the socialist government, and the fiction of Carme Riera and Terenci Moix. Special emphasis is placed on the emergence of mass media as a vehicle for expression in Spain. Consideration is given to the changes wrought by Spain's acceptance into the European Community. Materials include magazines, newspapers, films, fiction and Amando de Miguel's Los Españoles. This course is taught in Spanish. This course deals with the vast changes in Spanish social, political, and cultural life that have taken place since the death of Franco. It examines the new freedom from censorship; the re-emergence of strong movements for regional autonomy: the Basque region and Catalonia; the new cinema including Almodóvar and Saura; educational reforms instituted by the socialist government, and the fiction of Carme Riera and Terenci Moix. Special emphasis is placed on the emergence of mass media as a vehicle for expression in Spain. Consideration is given to the changes wrought by Spain's acceptance into the European Community. Materials include magazines, newspapers, films, fiction and Amando de Miguel's Los Españoles. This course is taught in Spanish.

Subjects

Spain | Spain | 1977 | 1977 | present | present | Spanish | Spanish | social | social | political | political | cultural life | cultural life | changes | changes | Franco | Franco | censorship | censorship | regional autonomy | regional autonomy | Basque | Basque | Catalonia | Catalonia | Almod?var | Almod?var | Saura | Saura | educational reforms | educational reforms | socialist | socialist | Carme Riera | Carme Riera | Terenci Moix | Terenci Moix | mass media | mass media | European Community | European Community | magazines | magazines | newspapers | newspapers | films | films | fiction | fiction | Amando de Miguel | Amando de Miguel | Los Espa?oles | Los Espa?oles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.45 Magnetic Materials (MIT)

Description

This course will cover the following topics: Magnetostatics Origin of magnetism in materials Magnetic domains and domain walls Magnetic anisotropy Reversible and irreversible magnetization processes Hard and soft magnetic materials Magnetic recording Special topics include magnetism of thin films, surfaces and fine particles; transport in ferromagnets, magnetoresistive sensors, and amorphous magnetic materials.

Subjects

Magnetostatics; magnetism; magnetic domains and domain walls; magnetic anisotropy; reversible and irreversible magnetization; hard and soft magnetic materials; magnetic recording; thin films; ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors; amorphous magnetic materials | Magnetostatics | magnetism | magnetic domains and domain walls | magnetic anisotropy | reversible and irreversible magnetization | hard and soft magnetic materials | magnetic recording | thin films | ferromagnets | magnetoresistive sensors | amorphous magnetic materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.342 The Royal Family (MIT) 21H.342 The Royal Family (MIT)

Description

This course is an an exploration of British culture and politics, focusing on the changing role of the monarchy from the accession of the House of Hanover (later Windsor) in 1714 to the present. The dynasty has encountered a series of crises, in which the personal and the political have been inextricably combined: for example, George III's mental illness; the scandalous behavior of his son, George IV; Victoria's withdrawal from public life after the death of Prince Albert; the abdication of Edward VIII; and the public antagonism sparked by sympathy for Diana, Princess of Wales. This course is an an exploration of British culture and politics, focusing on the changing role of the monarchy from the accession of the House of Hanover (later Windsor) in 1714 to the present. The dynasty has encountered a series of crises, in which the personal and the political have been inextricably combined: for example, George III's mental illness; the scandalous behavior of his son, George IV; Victoria's withdrawal from public life after the death of Prince Albert; the abdication of Edward VIII; and the public antagonism sparked by sympathy for Diana, Princess of Wales.

Subjects

england | england | britain | britain | culture | culture | history | history | monarchy | monarchy | windsor | windsor | hanover | hanover | george III | george III | George IV | George IV | victoria | victoria | albert | albert | prince | prince | queen | queen | king | king | edward VIII | edward VIII | diana | diana | princess | princess | dynasty | dynasty | politics | politics | william IV | william IV | empire | empire | elizabeth | elizabeth | George IV | victoria | George IV | victoria | Britain | Britain | British | British | Hanover | Hanover | Windsor | Windsor | 1714 | 1714 | crises | crises | George III | George III | scandal | scandal | Victoria | Victoria | Albert | Albert | abdication | abdication | Edward VIII | Edward VIII | Diana | Diana | Wales | Wales | portraits | portraits | news footage | news footage | films | films | Tudors | Tudors | Stuarts | Stuarts | pageantry | pageantry | royal | royal | George I | George I | George II | George II | England | England | Germany | Germany | regent | regent | William IV | William IV | empress | empress | India | India | Edward VII | Edward VII | George V | George V | war | war | George VI | George VI | Elizabeth II | Elizabeth II | British politics | British politics | British culture | British culture | Accession | Accession | House of Hanover | House of Hanover | House of Windsor | House of Windsor | political | political | mental illness | mental illness | public life | public life | Prince Albert | Prince Albert | Princess of Wales | Princess of Wales | German Kings | German Kings

License

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century. This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century.

Subjects

historical writing | historical writing | politics | politics | social | social | culture | culture | demographics | demographics | biography | biography | environment | environment | comparative literature | comparative literature | film | film | fiction | fiction | memoir | memoir | methodology | methodology | political | political | cultural | cultural | demographic | demographic | biographical | biographical | comparative | comparative | historical films | historical films | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | methods | methods | historians | historians | interpretation | interpretation | archives | archives | archivists | archivists | archival findings | archival findings | history | history | national identity | national identity | philosophy of history | philosophy of history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT) 3.35 Fracture and Fatigue (MIT)

Description

Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components. Investigation of linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics. Topics include microstructural effects on fracture in metals, ceramics, polymers, thin films, biological materials and composites, toughening mechanisms, crack growth resistance and creep fracture. Also covered: interface fracture mechanics, fatigue damage and dislocation substructures in single crystals, stress- and strain-life approach to fatigue, fatigue crack growth models and mechanisms, variable amplitude fatigue, corrosion fatigue and case studies of fracture and fatigue in structural, bioimplant, and microelectronic components.

Subjects

Linear elastic | Linear elastic | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | elastic-plastic fracture mechanics | Microstructural effects on fracture | Microstructural effects on fracture | Toughening mechanisms | Toughening mechanisms | Crack growth resistance | Crack growth resistance | creep fracture | creep fracture | Interface fracture mechanics | Interface fracture mechanics | Fatigue damage | Fatigue damage | dislocation substructures | dislocation substructures | Variable amplitude fatigue | Variable amplitude fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | Corrosion fatigue | experimental methods | experimental methods | microstructural effects | microstructural effects | metals | metals | ceramics | ceramics | polymers | polymers | thin films | thin films | biological materials | biological materials | composites | composites | single crystals | single crystals | stress-life | stress-life | strain-life | strain-life | structural components | structural components | bioimplant components | bioimplant components | microelectronic components | microelectronic components | case studies | case studies

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies? This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies?

Subjects

history | history | methodology | methodology | historian | historian | analysis | analysis | oral history | oral history | comparative history | comparative history | memory | memory | narrative | narrative | language | language | sources | sources | methods | methods | organization | organization | framing | framing | and style | and style | historical writing | historical writing | political history | political history | social history | social history | cultural history | cultural history | demographics | demographics | biographical writing | biographical writing | biography | biography | auto-biography | auto-biography | historical films | historical films | fiction | fiction | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | approach | approach | style | style | evidence | evidence | methodologies | methodologies | historical accounts | historical accounts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Wakulla Springs Promotional Comedy Wakulla Springs Promotional Comedy

Description

Subjects

tourism | tourism | boats | boats | fishing | fishing | florida | florida | cameramen | cameramen | underwaterphotography | underwaterphotography | wakullasprings | wakullasprings | promotionalfilms | promotionalfilms

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21A.337J Documenting Culture (MIT) 21A.337J Documenting Culture (MIT)

Description

How — and why — do people seek to capture everyday life on film? What can we learn from such films? This course challenges distinctions commonly made between documentary and ethnographic films to consider how human cultural life is portrayed in both. It considers the interests, which motivate such filmmakers ranging from curiosity about "exotic" people to a concern with capturing "real life" to a desire for advocacy. Students will view documentaries about people both in the U.S. and abroad and will consider such issues as the relationship between film images and "reality," the tensions between art and observation, and the ethical relationship between filmmakers and those they film. How — and why — do people seek to capture everyday life on film? What can we learn from such films? This course challenges distinctions commonly made between documentary and ethnographic films to consider how human cultural life is portrayed in both. It considers the interests, which motivate such filmmakers ranging from curiosity about "exotic" people to a concern with capturing "real life" to a desire for advocacy. Students will view documentaries about people both in the U.S. and abroad and will consider such issues as the relationship between film images and "reality," the tensions between art and observation, and the ethical relationship between filmmakers and those they film.

Subjects

documentary | documentary | ethnography | ethnography | documenting culture documentary tradition | documenting culture documentary tradition | anthropological films | anthropological films | ethics | ethics | film | film | anthropology | anthropology | 21A.337 | 21A.337 | CMS.917 | CMS.917

License

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21L.325 Small Wonders: Media, Modernity, and the Moment: Experiments in Time (MIT) 21L.325 Small Wonders: Media, Modernity, and the Moment: Experiments in Time (MIT)

Description

The "small wonders" to which our course will attend are moments of present time, depicted in the verbal and visual media of the modern age: newspapers, novels and stories, poems, photographs, films, etc. We will move between visual and verbal media across a considerable span of time, from eighteenth-century poetry and prose fiction to twenty-first century social networking and microblogging sites, and from sculpture to photography, film, and digital visual media. With help from philosophers, contemporary cultural historians, and others, we will begin to think about a media practice largely taken for granted in our own moment. The "small wonders" to which our course will attend are moments of present time, depicted in the verbal and visual media of the modern age: newspapers, novels and stories, poems, photographs, films, etc. We will move between visual and verbal media across a considerable span of time, from eighteenth-century poetry and prose fiction to twenty-first century social networking and microblogging sites, and from sculpture to photography, film, and digital visual media. With help from philosophers, contemporary cultural historians, and others, we will begin to think about a media practice largely taken for granted in our own moment.

Subjects

media | media | modernity | modernity | moment | moment | Jonathan Swift | Jonathan Swift | William Wordsworth | William Wordsworth | John Keats | John Keats | Virginia Woolf | Virginia Woolf | short texts | short texts | short visual works | short visual works | short films | short films

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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City With A New Look City With A New Look

Description

Subjects

orlando | orlando | florida | florida | recreation | recreation | cattleindustry | cattleindustry | aerospaceindustry | aerospaceindustry | citrusindustry | citrusindustry | promotionalfilms | promotionalfilms

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Reflections of the Good Life Reflections of the Good Life

Description

Subjects

horses | horses | tourism | tourism | sports | sports | hockey | hockey | sailing | sailing | cattle | cattle | baseball | baseball | florida | florida | rollerderby | rollerderby | westpalmbeach | westpalmbeach | beaches | beaches | boating | boating | recreation | recreation | agriculture | agriculture | palmbeach | palmbeach | palmbeachcounty | palmbeachcounty | loxahatchee | loxahatchee | dunebuggies | dunebuggies | insdustries | insdustries | promotionalfilms | promotionalfilms

License

No known copyright restrictions

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Museum a Circus Built Museum a Circus Built

Description

Subjects

art | art | florida | florida | drawing | drawing | artists | artists | sarasota | sarasota | museums | museums | attractions | attractions | ringlingmuseum | ringlingmuseum | johnandmableringling | johnandmableringling | promotionalfilms | promotionalfilms

License

No known copyright restrictions

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21W.730-2 The Creative Spark (MIT) 21W.730-2 The Creative Spark (MIT)

Description

"Creative activity (isn't) the icing on the cake. Human creativity is the cake." (Jerry Hirschberg) Creativity - "the mastery of information and skills in the service of dreams" (Hirschberg) - is much prized in the arts, science, business and the classroom. What does the creative process look like? Under what conditions does it flourish - what ignites the creative spark? Attempting to answer these questions, this class explores ways creativity has been understood in Western culture: what we prize and fear about creativity and its wellsprings; how writers, artists, scientists and inventors have described their own creative processes; how psychologists and philosophers have theorized it; ways in which creativity has been represented in Western culture, particularly "Creative activity (isn't) the icing on the cake. Human creativity is the cake." (Jerry Hirschberg) Creativity - "the mastery of information and skills in the service of dreams" (Hirschberg) - is much prized in the arts, science, business and the classroom. What does the creative process look like? Under what conditions does it flourish - what ignites the creative spark? Attempting to answer these questions, this class explores ways creativity has been understood in Western culture: what we prize and fear about creativity and its wellsprings; how writers, artists, scientists and inventors have described their own creative processes; how psychologists and philosophers have theorized it; ways in which creativity has been represented in Western culture, particularly

Subjects

Creativity | Creativity | mastery | mastery | information | information | skills | skills | dreams | dreams | creative process | creative process | creative spark | creative spark | writing | writing | communication | communication | Western culture | Western culture | writers | writers | artists | artists | scientists | scientists | inventors | inventors | psychologists | psychologists | philosophers | philosophers | Twentieth century | Twentieth century | films | films | everyday life | everyday life | Rollo May | Rollo May | Joan Didion | Joan Didion | John Updike | John Updike | Alice Walker | Alice Walker | Oliver Sacks | Oliver Sacks | Paul Taylor | Paul Taylor | Maya Lin | Maya Lin | Dave Brubeck | Dave Brubeck | journals | journals

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | materials selection | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.627 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics (MIT) 2.627 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics (MIT)

Description

In this course, students learn about the fundamentals of photoelectric conversion: charge excitation, conduction, separation, and collection. Lectures cover commercial and emerging photovoltaic technologies and cross-cutting themes, including conversion efficiencies, loss mechanisms, characterization, manufacturing, systems, reliability, life-cycle analysis, and risk analysis. Some of the course will also be devoted to discussing photovoltaic technology evolution in the context of markets, policies, society, and environment. In this course, students learn about the fundamentals of photoelectric conversion: charge excitation, conduction, separation, and collection. Lectures cover commercial and emerging photovoltaic technologies and cross-cutting themes, including conversion efficiencies, loss mechanisms, characterization, manufacturing, systems, reliability, life-cycle analysis, and risk analysis. Some of the course will also be devoted to discussing photovoltaic technology evolution in the context of markets, policies, society, and environment.

Subjects

photovoltaics | photovoltaics | renewable energy | renewable energy | solar | solar | pn-junction | pn-junction | quantum efficiency | quantum efficiency | bandgap | bandgap | thermalization | thermalization | semiconductor | semiconductor | thin films | thin films | charge excitation | charge excitation | conduction | conduction | commercialization | commercialization | emerging technologies | emerging technologies | conversion efficiencies | conversion efficiencies | loss mechanisms | loss mechanisms | manufacturing | manufacturing | life-cycle analysis | life-cycle analysis | markets | markets | policy | policy | society | society | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.311 Introduction to French Culture (MIT) 21G.311 Introduction to French Culture (MIT)

Description

Ce cours est une introduction à la culture et la société françaises depuis la Révolution, mais surtout à partir du Second Empire. Nous tacherons de cerner ce qui définit la singularité francaise dans une perspective historique. Nous commencerons avec la notion "d'exception francaise" et de ce qui la constitue depuis la Révolution (La République, L'Universalisme, La Laicité, etc.) Nous explorerons l'impact de l'industrialisation, ainsi que la tension entre la France pays de la modernité dans les arts et la technologie et la France nostalgique de sa grandeur passée. Nous discuterons les moments charnières de cette tension avec les grands débats d'idées autour Ce cours est une introduction à la culture et la société françaises depuis la Révolution, mais surtout à partir du Second Empire. Nous tacherons de cerner ce qui définit la singularité francaise dans une perspective historique. Nous commencerons avec la notion "d'exception francaise" et de ce qui la constitue depuis la Révolution (La République, L'Universalisme, La Laicité, etc.) Nous explorerons l'impact de l'industrialisation, ainsi que la tension entre la France pays de la modernité dans les arts et la technologie et la France nostalgique de sa grandeur passée. Nous discuterons les moments charnières de cette tension avec les grands débats d'idées autour

Subjects

France | France | introduction | introduction | culture | culture | soci?t? | soci?t? | fran?aises | fran?aises | R?volution | R?volution | Second Empire | Second Empire | historique | historique | La R?publique | La R?publique | L'Universalisme | L'Universalisme | La Laicit? | La Laicit? | l'industrialisation | l'industrialisation | modernit? | modernit? | arts | arts | technologie | technologie | nostalgique | nostalgique | grandeur | grandeur | pass?e | pass?e | impressionistes | impressionistes | "Fleurs du Mal" | "Fleurs du Mal" | Paris de Haussmann | Paris de Haussmann | Tour Eiffel | Tour Eiffel | expositions universelles et coloniales | expositions universelles et coloniales | litt?raire | litt?raire | filmique | filmique | crises hexagonales | crises hexagonales | marqu? le 20e si?cle | marqu? le 20e si?cle | l'Affaire Dreyfus | l'Affaire Dreyfus | deux guerres mondiales le colonialisme | deux guerres mondiales le colonialisme | guerre d'Alg?rie | guerre d'Alg?rie | Mai 68 | Mai 68 | textes | textes | images | images | articles de journaux | articles de journaux | films | films | identit? Fran?aise. | identit? Fran?aise. | 21F.311 | 21F.311 | 21F.312 | 21F.312

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.626 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics (MIT) 2.626 Fundamentals of Photovoltaics (MIT)

Description

In this course students will learn how solar cells convert light into electricity, how solar cells are manufactured, how solar cells are evaluated, what technologies are currently on the market, and how to evaluate the risk and potential of existing and emerging solar cell technologies. We examine the potential & drawbacks of currently manufactured technologies (single- and multi-crystalline silicon, micromorph tandem cells, CdTe, CIGS, CPV, PVT), as well as pre-commercial technologies (organics, biomimetic, organic/inorganic hybrid, and nanostructure-based solar cells). Hands-on laboratory sessions explore how a solar cell works in practice. We scrutinize what limits solar cell performance and cost, and the major hurdles — technological, economic, and political — towards w In this course students will learn how solar cells convert light into electricity, how solar cells are manufactured, how solar cells are evaluated, what technologies are currently on the market, and how to evaluate the risk and potential of existing and emerging solar cell technologies. We examine the potential & drawbacks of currently manufactured technologies (single- and multi-crystalline silicon, micromorph tandem cells, CdTe, CIGS, CPV, PVT), as well as pre-commercial technologies (organics, biomimetic, organic/inorganic hybrid, and nanostructure-based solar cells). Hands-on laboratory sessions explore how a solar cell works in practice. We scrutinize what limits solar cell performance and cost, and the major hurdles — technological, economic, and political — towards w

Subjects

thin films | thin films | student work | student work | commercialization | commercialization | semiconductor engineering | semiconductor engineering | doped polymer | doped polymer | nanostructures | nanostructures | self-organized systems | self-organized systems | alternative energy | alternative energy | manufacturing | manufacturing | quantum dots | quantum dots | global energy supply | global energy supply

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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3.032 Mechanical Behavior of Materials (MIT)

Description

Here we will learn about the mechanical behavior of structures and materials, from the continuum description of properties to the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that confer those properties to all materials. We will cover elastic and plastic deformation, creep, and fracture of materials including crystalline and amorphous metals, ceramics, and (bio)polymers, and will focus on the design and processing of materials from the atomic to the macroscale to achieve desired mechanical behavior. Integrated laboratories provide the opportunity to explore these concepts through hands-on experiments including instrumentation of pressure vessels, visualization of atomistic deformation in bubble rafts, nanoindentation, and uniaxial mechanical testing, as well as writing assignments to communicate th

Subjects

Basic concepts of solid mechanics and mechanical behavior of materials | stress-strain relationships | stress transformation | elasticity | plasticity and fracture. Case studies include materials selection for bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants; residual stresses in thin films; and ancient materials. Lab experiments and demonstrations give hands-on experience of the physical concepts at a variety of length scales. Use of facilities for measuring mechanical properties including standard mechanical tests | bubble raft models | atomic force microscopy and nanoindentation. | plasticity and fracture | Case studies | materials selection | bicycle frames | stress shielding in biomedical implants | residual stresses in thin films | ancient materials | standard mechanical tests | solid mechanics | mechanical behavior of materials

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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