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21G.223 Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation (MIT) 21G.223 Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is designed for high-intermediate ESL students who need to develop better listening comprehension and oral skills, which will primarily be achieved by detailed instructions on pronunciation. Our focus will be on (1) producing accurate and intelligible English, (2) becoming more comfortable listening to rapidly spoken English, and (3) learning common expressions, gambits, and idioms used in both formal and informal contexts. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course is designed for high-intermediate ESL students who need to develop better listening comprehension and oral skills, which will primarily be achieved by detailed instructions on pronunciation. Our focus will be on (1) producing accurate and intelligible English, (2) becoming more comfortable listening to rapidly spoken English, and (3) learning common expressions, gambits, and idioms used in both formal and informal contexts.

Subjects

English; second; language; ESL; listening; comprehension; oral; skills; pronunciation; common expressions; gambits; idioms; formal; informal; contexts. | English; second; language; ESL; listening; comprehension; oral; skills; pronunciation; common expressions; gambits; idioms; formal; informal; contexts. | English | English | second | second | language | language | ESL | ESL | listening | listening | comprehension | comprehension | oral | oral | skills | skills | pronunciation | pronunciation | common expressions | common expressions | gambits | gambits | idioms | idioms | formal | formal | informal | informal | contexts | contexts | 21F.223 | 21F.223 | 21F.224 | 21F.224

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT) 18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT)

Description

Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory. Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory.

Subjects

perturbative quantum field theory | perturbative quantum field theory | classical field theory | classical field theory | free quantum theories | free quantum theories | Feynman diagrams | Feynman diagrams | Renormalization theory | Renormalization theory | Local operators | Local operators | Operator product expansion | Operator product expansion | Renormalization group equation | Renormalization group equation | classical | classical | field | field | theory | theory | Feynman | Feynman | diagrams | diagrams | free | free | quantum | quantum | theories | theories | local | local | operators | operators | product | product | expansion | expansion | perturbative | perturbative | renormalization | renormalization | group | group | equations | equations | functional | functional | function | function | intergrals | intergrals | operator | operator | QFT | QFT | string | string | physics | physics | mathematics | mathematics | geometry | geometry | geometric | geometric | algebraic | algebraic | topology | topology | number | number | 0-dimensional | 0-dimensional | 1-dimensional | 1-dimensional | d-dimensional | d-dimensional | supergeometry | supergeometry | supersymmetry | supersymmetry | conformal | conformal | stationary | stationary | phase | phase | formula | formula | calculus | calculus | combinatorics | combinatorics | matrix | matrix | mechanics | mechanics | lagrangians | lagrangians | hamiltons | hamiltons | least | least | action | action | principle | principle | limits | limits | formalism | formalism | Feynman-Kac | Feynman-Kac | current | current | charges | charges | Noether?s | Noether?s | theorem | theorem | path | path | integral | integral | approach | approach | divergences | divergences | functional integrals | functional integrals | fee quantum theories | fee quantum theories | renormalization theory | renormalization theory | local operators | local operators | operator product expansion | operator product expansion | renormalization group equation | renormalization group equation | mathematical language | mathematical language | string theory | string theory | 0-dimensional QFT | 0-dimensional QFT | Stationary Phase Formula | Stationary Phase Formula | Matrix Models | Matrix Models | Large N Limits | Large N Limits | 1-dimensional QFT | 1-dimensional QFT | Classical Mechanics | Classical Mechanics | Least Action Principle | Least Action Principle | Path Integral Approach | Path Integral Approach | Quantum Mechanics | Quantum Mechanics | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Operator Formalism | Operator Formalism | Feynman-Kac Formula | Feynman-Kac Formula | d-dimensional QFT | d-dimensional QFT | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Currents | Currents | Noether?s Theorem | Noether?s Theorem | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Perturbative Expansion | Perturbative Expansion | Renormalization Theory | Renormalization Theory | Conformal Field Theory | Conformal Field Theory | algebraic topology | algebraic topology | algebraic geometry | algebraic geometry | number theory | number theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.223 Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation (MIT)

Description

This course is designed for high-intermediate ESL students who need to develop better listening comprehension and oral skills, which will primarily be achieved by detailed instructions on pronunciation. Our focus will be on (1) producing accurate and intelligible English, (2) becoming more comfortable listening to rapidly spoken English, and (3) learning common expressions, gambits, and idioms used in both formal and informal contexts.

Subjects

English; second; language; ESL; listening; comprehension; oral; skills; pronunciation; common expressions; gambits; idioms; formal; informal; contexts. | English | second | language | ESL | listening | comprehension | oral | skills | pronunciation | common expressions | gambits | idioms | formal | informal | contexts | 21F.223 | 21F.224

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT) 14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. The goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. We will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. This is an empirical class. For each topic, we will study several concrete examples chosen from around the world. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or non-governmental organizations (NGOs))? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful? This course explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. The goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. We will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. This is an empirical class. For each topic, we will study several concrete examples chosen from around the world. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or non-governmental organizations (NGOs))? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful?

Subjects

Economics | Economics | development | development | policy | policy | human | human | education | education | health | health | gender | gender | family | family | land | land | relations | relations | risk | risk | informal | informal | formal | formal | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | decisions | decisions | poor | poor | households | households | countries | countries | government | government | international | international | organizations | organizations | Non-governmental organizations | Non-governmental organizations | NGOs | NGOs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.661 Theory and Method in the Study of Architecture and Art (MIT) 4.661 Theory and Method in the Study of Architecture and Art (MIT)

Description

This seminar is open to graduate students, and is intended to offer a synoptic view of selected methodologies and thinkers in art history (with some implications for architecture). It is a writing-intensive class based on the premise that writing and editing are forms of critical thinking. The syllabus outlines the structure of the course and the readings and assignments for each week. The discipline of art history periodically surges into "crisis." The demise of formalism as a guiding tenet, or connoisseurial appreciation as a general guide, plunged the field into confusion during the 1970s when the battle raged over "social histories of art" or "revisionism;" in the late 1990s the debate was staged between "visual studies" versus "normative art history." The course takes this c This seminar is open to graduate students, and is intended to offer a synoptic view of selected methodologies and thinkers in art history (with some implications for architecture). It is a writing-intensive class based on the premise that writing and editing are forms of critical thinking. The syllabus outlines the structure of the course and the readings and assignments for each week. The discipline of art history periodically surges into "crisis." The demise of formalism as a guiding tenet, or connoisseurial appreciation as a general guide, plunged the field into confusion during the 1970s when the battle raged over "social histories of art" or "revisionism;" in the late 1990s the debate was staged between "visual studies" versus "normative art history." The course takes this c

Subjects

Theory | Theory | Method | Method | Architecture | Architecture | art history | art history | demise of formalism | demise of formalism | formalism | formalism | connoisseurial appreciation | connoisseurial appreciation | art historical prose | art historical prose | writing | writing | intensive | intensive | writing-intensive | writing-intensive

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.241 Logic I (MIT) 24.241 Logic I (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the aims and techniques of formal logic. Logic is the science of correct argument, and our study of logic will aim to understand what makes a correct argument good, that is, what is it about the structure of a correct argument that guarantees that, if the premises are all true, the conclusion will be true as well? Our subject (though, to be sure, we can only scratch the surface) will be truth and proof, and the connection between them. This course provides an introduction to the aims and techniques of formal logic. Logic is the science of correct argument, and our study of logic will aim to understand what makes a correct argument good, that is, what is it about the structure of a correct argument that guarantees that, if the premises are all true, the conclusion will be true as well? Our subject (though, to be sure, we can only scratch the surface) will be truth and proof, and the connection between them.

Subjects

techniques of formal logic | techniques of formal logic | truth functions | truth functions | quantifiers | quantifiers | validity | validity | formal deduction | formal deduction | logic applications | logic applications | philosophy | philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.223 Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation (MIT)

Description

This course is designed for high-intermediate ESL students who need to develop better listening comprehension and oral skills, which will primarily be achieved by detailed instructions on pronunciation. Our focus will be on (1) producing accurate and intelligible English, (2) becoming more comfortable listening to rapidly spoken English, and (3) learning common expressions, gambits, and idioms used in both formal and informal contexts.

Subjects

English; second; language; ESL; listening; comprehension; oral; skills; pronunciation; common expressions; gambits; idioms; formal; informal; contexts. | English | second | language | ESL | listening | comprehension | oral | skills | pronunciation | common expressions | gambits | idioms | formal | informal | contexts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT) 14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or NGOs)? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful? In this course, we will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or NGOs)? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful?

Subjects

Economics | Economics | development | development | policy | policy | human | human | education | education | health | health | gender | gender | family | family | land | land | relations | relations | risk | risk | informal | informal | formal | formal | norms | norms | institutions | institutions | decisions | decisions | poor | poor | households | households | countries | countries | government | government | international | international | organizations | organizations | Non-governmental organizations | Non-governmental organizations | NGOs | NGOs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.241 Logic I (MIT) 24.241 Logic I (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the aims and techniques of formal logic. The logic of truth functions and quantifiers. The concepts of validity and truth and their relation to formal deduction. Applications of logic and the place of logic in philosophy. Introduction to the aims and techniques of formal logic. The logic of truth functions and quantifiers. The concepts of validity and truth and their relation to formal deduction. Applications of logic and the place of logic in philosophy.

Subjects

formal logic | formal logic | truth functions | truth functions | quantifiers | quantifiers | validity | validity | truth | truth | formal deduction | formal deduction | applications of logic | applications of logic | logic in philosophy | logic in philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.223 Listening, Speaking, and Pronunciation (MIT)

Description

This course is designed for high-intermediate ESL students who need to develop better listening comprehension and oral skills, which will primarily be achieved by detailed instructions on pronunciation. Our focus will be on (1) producing accurate and intelligible English, (2) becoming more comfortable listening to rapidly spoken English, and (3) learning common expressions, gambits, and idioms used in both formal and informal contexts.

Subjects

English; second; language; ESL; listening; comprehension; oral; skills; pronunciation; common expressions; gambits; idioms; formal; informal; contexts. | English | second | language | ESL | listening | comprehension | oral | skills | pronunciation | common expressions | gambits | idioms | formal | informal | contexts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.661 Theory and Method in the Study of Architecture and Art (MIT) 4.661 Theory and Method in the Study of Architecture and Art (MIT)

Description

This seminar is open to graduate students, and is intended to offer a synoptic view of selected methodologies and thinkers in art and architectural history (with many theorists from other fields). The syllabus outlines the structure of the course and the readings and assignments for each week; the goal is to become aware of the apparatuses of discourse, and find your own voice within them. This seminar is open to graduate students, and is intended to offer a synoptic view of selected methodologies and thinkers in art and architectural history (with many theorists from other fields). The syllabus outlines the structure of the course and the readings and assignments for each week; the goal is to become aware of the apparatuses of discourse, and find your own voice within them.

Subjects

Theory | Theory | Method | Method | Architecture | Architecture | art history | art history | demise of formalism | demise of formalism | formalism | formalism | connoisseurial appreciation | connoisseurial appreciation | art historical prose | art historical prose | writing | writing | intensive | intensive | writing-intensive | writing-intensive | revisionism | revisionism | social history | social history | visual studies | visual studies | anthropology | anthropology | globalism | globalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT) 6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university.  6.050J / 2.110J presents the unified theory of information with applications to computing, communications, thermodynamics, and other sciences. It covers digital signals and streams, codes, compression, noise, and probability, reversible and irreversible operations, information in biological systems, channel capacity, maximum-entropy formalism, thermodynamic equilibrium, temperature, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, and quantum computation. Designed for MIT freshmen as an elective, this course has been jointly developed by MIT's Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Mechanical Engineering. There is no known course similar to 6.050J / 2.110J offered at any other university. 

Subjects

information and entropy | information and entropy | computing | computing | communications | communications | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | digital signals and streams | codes | codes | compression | compression | noise | noise | probability | probability | reversible operations | reversible operations | irreversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | information in biological systems | channel capacity | channel capacity | aximum-entropy formalism | aximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | maximum-entropy formalism | maximum-entropy formalism | second law of thermodynamics | second law of thermodynamics | quantum computation | quantum computation | biological systems | biological systems | unified theory of information | unified theory of information | digital signals | digital signals | digital streams | digital streams | bits | bits | errors | errors | processes | processes | inference | inference | maximum entropy | maximum entropy | physical systems | physical systems | energy | energy | quantum information | quantum information | 6.050 | 6.050 | 2.110 | 2.110

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.238 Geometry and Quantum Field Theory (MIT)

Description

Geometry and Quantum Field Theory, designed for mathematicians, is a rigorous introduction to perturbative quantum field theory, using the language of functional integrals. It covers the basics of classical field theory, free quantum theories and Feynman diagrams. The goal is to discuss, using mathematical language, a number of basic notions and results of QFT that are necessary to understand talks and papers in QFT and String Theory.

Subjects

perturbative quantum field theory | classical field theory | free quantum theories | Feynman diagrams | Renormalization theory | Local operators | Operator product expansion | Renormalization group equation | classical | field | theory | Feynman | diagrams | free | quantum | theories | local | operators | product | expansion | perturbative | renormalization | group | equations | functional | function | intergrals | operator | QFT | string | physics | mathematics | geometry | geometric | algebraic | topology | number | 0-dimensional | 1-dimensional | d-dimensional | supergeometry | supersymmetry | conformal | stationary | phase | formula | calculus | combinatorics | matrix | mechanics | lagrangians | hamiltons | least | action | principle | limits | formalism | Feynman-Kac | current | charges | Noether?s | theorem | path | integral | approach | divergences | functional integrals | fee quantum theories | renormalization theory | local operators | operator product expansion | renormalization group equation | mathematical language | string theory | 0-dimensional QFT | Stationary Phase Formula | Matrix Models | Large N Limits | 1-dimensional QFT | Classical Mechanics | Least Action Principle | Path Integral Approach | Quantum Mechanics | Perturbative Expansion using Feynman Diagrams | Operator Formalism | Feynman-Kac Formula | d-dimensional QFT | Formalism of Classical Field Theory | Currents | Noether?s Theorem | Path Integral Approach to QFT | Perturbative Expansion | Renormalization Theory | Conformal Field Theory | algebraic topology | algebraic geometry | number theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.74 Foundations of Development Policy (MIT)

Description

This course explores the foundations of policy making in developing countries. The goal is to spell out various policy options and to quantify the trade-offs between them. We will study the different facets of human development: education, health, gender, the family, land relations, risk, informal and formal norms and institutions. This is an empirical class. For each topic, we will study several concrete examples chosen from around the world. While studying each of these topics, we will ask: What determines the decisions of poor households in developing countries? What constraints are they subject to? Is there a scope for policy (by government, international organizations, or non-governmental organizations (NGOs))? What policies have been tried out? Have they been successful?

Subjects

Economics | development | policy | human | education | health | gender | family | land | relations | risk | informal | formal | norms | institutions | decisions | poor | households | countries | government | international | organizations | Non-governmental organizations | NGOs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Table set in preparation for a banquet at Queens Hotel Townsville Table set in preparation for a banquet at Queens Hotel Townsville

Description

Subjects

banquettable | banquettable | banquet | banquet | formal | formal | tablesetting | tablesetting | ornate | ornate

License

No known copyright restrictions

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24.241 Logic I (MIT)

Description

Introduction to the aims and techniques of formal logic. The logic of truth functions and quantifiers. The concepts of validity and truth and their relation to formal deduction. Applications of logic and the place of logic in philosophy.

Subjects

formal logic | truth functions | quantifiers | validity | truth | formal deduction | applications of logic | logic in philosophy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.661 Theory and Method in the Study of Architecture and Art (MIT)

Description

This seminar is open to graduate students, and is intended to offer a synoptic view of selected methodologies and thinkers in art and architectural history (with many theorists from other fields). The syllabus outlines the structure of the course and the readings and assignments for each week; the goal is to become aware of the apparatuses of discourse, and find your own voice within them.

Subjects

Theory | Method | Architecture | art history | demise of formalism | formalism | connoisseurial appreciation | art historical prose | writing | intensive | writing-intensive | revisionism | social history | visual studies | anthropology | globalism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.324 Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II (MIT) 8.324 Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second course of the quantum field theory trimester sequence beginning with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I (8.323) and ending with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory III (8.325). It develops in depth some of the topics discussed in 8.323 and introduces some advanced material. Topics include functional path integrals, renormalization and renormalization groups, quantization of nonabelian gauge theories, BRST symmetry, renormalization and symmetry breaking, critical exponents and scalar field theory, and perturbation theory anomalies. This course is the second course of the quantum field theory trimester sequence beginning with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I (8.323) and ending with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory III (8.325). It develops in depth some of the topics discussed in 8.323 and introduces some advanced material. Topics include functional path integrals, renormalization and renormalization groups, quantization of nonabelian gauge theories, BRST symmetry, renormalization and symmetry breaking, critical exponents and scalar field theory, and perturbation theory anomalies.

Subjects

Quantum Field Theory | Quantum Field Theory | nonabelian gauge theories | nonabelian gauge theories | BRST symmetry | BRST symmetry | Perturbation theory anomalies | Perturbation theory anomalies | Renormalization | Renormalization | symmetry breaking | symmetry breaking | Critical exponents | Critical exponents | scalar field theory | scalar field theory | Conformal field theory | Conformal field theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.355J Advanced Software Engineering (MIT) 16.355J Advanced Software Engineering (MIT)

Description

A reading and discussion subject on advanced topics in the engineering of software systems. Focus on software development. Topics differ but are chosen from: software process and lifecycle; requirements development, specification and analysis; design principles; testing, formal analysis, and reviews; quality management and assessment; product and process metrics; COTS and reuse; evolution and maintenance; team organization and people management; software engineering aspects of programming languages; and software psychology. A reading and discussion subject on advanced topics in the engineering of software systems. Focus on software development. Topics differ but are chosen from: software process and lifecycle; requirements development, specification and analysis; design principles; testing, formal analysis, and reviews; quality management and assessment; product and process metrics; COTS and reuse; evolution and maintenance; team organization and people management; software engineering aspects of programming languages; and software psychology.

Subjects

software engineering | software engineering | software development | software development | software requirements | software requirements | software specification | software specification | software analysis | software analysis | formal analysis | formal analysis | quality management | quality management | product metrics | product metrics | process metrics | process metrics | COTS | COTS | software psychology | software psychology | 16.355 | 16.355 | ESD.355 | ESD.355

License

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6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT) 6.050J Information and Entropy (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation, with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include: information and computation, digital signals, codes and compression, applications such as biological representations of information, logic circuits, computer architectures, and algorithmic information, noise, probability, error correction, reversible and irreversible operations, physics of computation, and quantum computation. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics. Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This course explores the ultimate limits to communication and computation, with an emphasis on the physical nature of information and information processing. Topics include: information and computation, digital signals, codes and compression, applications such as biological representations of information, logic circuits, computer architectures, and algorithmic information, noise, probability, error correction, reversible and irreversible operations, physics of computation, and quantum computation. The concept of entropy applied to channel capacity and to the second law of thermodynamics.

Subjects

information and entropy | information and entropy | computing | computing | communications | communications | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | digital signals and streams | digital signals and streams | codes | codes | compression | compression | noise | noise | probability | probability | reversible operations | reversible operations | irreversible operations | irreversible operations | information in biological systems | information in biological systems | channel capacity | channel capacity | maximum-entropy formalism | maximum-entropy formalism | thermodynamic equilibrium | thermodynamic equilibrium | temperature | temperature | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation | second law of thermodynamics quantum computation

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4.661 Theory and Method in the Study of Architecture and Art (MIT)

Description

This seminar is open to graduate students, and is intended to offer a synoptic view of selected methodologies and thinkers in art history (with some implications for architecture). It is a writing-intensive class based on the premise that writing and editing are forms of critical thinking. The syllabus outlines the structure of the course and the readings and assignments for each week. The discipline of art history periodically surges into "crisis." The demise of formalism as a guiding tenet, or connoisseurial appreciation as a general guide, plunged the field into confusion during the 1970s when the battle raged over "social histories of art" or "revisionism;" in the late 1990s the debate was staged between "visual studies" versus "normative art history." The course takes this c

Subjects

Theory | Method | Architecture | art history | demise of formalism | formalism | connoisseurial appreciation | art historical prose | writing | intensive | writing-intensive

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14.282 Organizational Economics (MIT) 14.282 Organizational Economics (MIT)

Description

This course in organizational economics prepares doctoral students for further study in the field. The course introduces the classic papers and some recent research. The material is organized into the following modules: boundaries of the firm, employment in organizations, decision-making in organizations, and structures and processes in organizations. Each class session covers a few leading papers. This course was joint-taught between faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The Harvard course is Economics 2670 Organizational Economics. This course in organizational economics prepares doctoral students for further study in the field. The course introduces the classic papers and some recent research. The material is organized into the following modules: boundaries of the firm, employment in organizations, decision-making in organizations, and structures and processes in organizations. Each class session covers a few leading papers. This course was joint-taught between faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The Harvard course is Economics 2670 Organizational Economics.

Subjects

organizational economics | organizational economics | classic evidence | classic evidence | formal theories | formal theories | contracting between firms | contracting between firms | evidence on contracts | evidence on contracts | business cases | business cases | performance pay | performance pay | incentives | incentives | job assignment | job assignment | skill development | skill development | networks | networks | employment systems | employment systems | decision processes | decision processes | authority | authority | power | power | leadership | leadership | politics | politics | influence | influence | language | language | hierarchical models | hierarchical models | organizational structure | organizational structure | conglomerates | conglomerates | corporate strategy | corporate strategy | corporate governance | corporate governance | corporate capital | corporate capital | firm | firm | relational contracts | relational contracts

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8.05 Quantum Physics II (MIT) 8.05 Quantum Physics II (MIT)

Description

This course, along with the next course in this sequence (8.06, Quantum Physics III) in a two-course sequence covering quantum physics with applications drawn from modern physics. General formalism of quantum mechanics: states, operators, Dirac notation, representations, measurement theory. Harmonic oscillator: operator algebra, states. Quantum mechanics in three-dimensions: central potentials and the radial equation, bound and scattering states, qualitative analysis of wavefunctions. Angular momentum: operators, commutator algebra, eigenvalues and eigenstates, spherical harmonics. Spin: Stern-Gerlach devices and measurements, nuclear magnetic resonance, spin and statistics. Addition of angular momentum: Clebsch-Gordan series and coefficients, spin systems, and allotropic forms of hydrogen This course, along with the next course in this sequence (8.06, Quantum Physics III) in a two-course sequence covering quantum physics with applications drawn from modern physics. General formalism of quantum mechanics: states, operators, Dirac notation, representations, measurement theory. Harmonic oscillator: operator algebra, states. Quantum mechanics in three-dimensions: central potentials and the radial equation, bound and scattering states, qualitative analysis of wavefunctions. Angular momentum: operators, commutator algebra, eigenvalues and eigenstates, spherical harmonics. Spin: Stern-Gerlach devices and measurements, nuclear magnetic resonance, spin and statistics. Addition of angular momentum: Clebsch-Gordan series and coefficients, spin systems, and allotropic forms of hydrogen

Subjects

General formalism of quantum mechanics: states | General formalism of quantum mechanics: states | operators | operators | Dirac notation | Dirac notation | representations | representations | measurement theory | measurement theory | Harmonic oscillator: operator algebra | Harmonic oscillator: operator algebra | states | states | Quantum mechanics in three-dimensions: central potentials and the radial equation | Quantum mechanics in three-dimensions: central potentials and the radial equation | bound and scattering states | bound and scattering states | qualitative analysis of wavefunctions | qualitative analysis of wavefunctions | Angular momentum: operators | Angular momentum: operators | commutator algebra | commutator algebra | eigenvalues and eigenstates | eigenvalues and eigenstates | spherical harmonics | spherical harmonics | Spin: Stern-Gerlach devices and measurements | Spin: Stern-Gerlach devices and measurements | nuclear magnetic resonance | nuclear magnetic resonance | spin and statistics | spin and statistics | Addition of angular momentum: Clebsch-Gordan series and coefficients | Addition of angular momentum: Clebsch-Gordan series and coefficients | spin systems | spin systems | allotropic forms of hydrogen | allotropic forms of hydrogen | Angular momentum | Angular momentum | Harmonic oscillator | Harmonic oscillator | operator algebra | operator algebra | Spin | Spin | Stern-Gerlach devices and measurements | Stern-Gerlach devices and measurements | central potentials and the radial equation | central potentials and the radial equation | Clebsch-Gordan series and coefficients | Clebsch-Gordan series and coefficients | quantum physics | quantum physics

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8.324 Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II (MIT) 8.324 Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II (MIT)

Description

This course is the second course of the quantum field theory trimester sequence beginning with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I (8.323) and ending with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory III (8.325). It develops in depth some of the topics discussed in 8.323 and introduces some advanced material. This course is the second course of the quantum field theory trimester sequence beginning with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I (8.323) and ending with Relativistic Quantum Field Theory III (8.325). It develops in depth some of the topics discussed in 8.323 and introduces some advanced material.

Subjects

Quantum Field Theory | Quantum Field Theory | nonabelian gauge theories | nonabelian gauge theories | BRST symmetry | BRST symmetry | Perturbation theory anomalies | Perturbation theory anomalies | Renormalization | Renormalization | symmetry breaking | symmetry breaking | Critical exponents | Critical exponents | scalar field theory | scalar field theory | Conformal field theory | Conformal field theory

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6.042J Mathematics for Computer Science (MIT) 6.042J Mathematics for Computer Science (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This subject offers an interactive introduction to discrete mathematics oriented toward computer science and engineering. The subject coverage divides roughly into thirds: Fundamental concepts of mathematics: Definitions, proofs, sets, functions, relations. Discrete structures: graphs, state machines, modular arithmetic, counting. Discrete probability theory. On completion of 6.042J, students will be able to explain and apply the basic methods of discrete (noncontinuous) mathematics in computer science. They will be able to use these methods in subsequent courses in the design and analysis of algorithms, computability theory, software engineering, and computer systems.Interactive site components can be found on the Unit pages in the Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This subject offers an interactive introduction to discrete mathematics oriented toward computer science and engineering. The subject coverage divides roughly into thirds: Fundamental concepts of mathematics: Definitions, proofs, sets, functions, relations. Discrete structures: graphs, state machines, modular arithmetic, counting. Discrete probability theory. On completion of 6.042J, students will be able to explain and apply the basic methods of discrete (noncontinuous) mathematics in computer science. They will be able to use these methods in subsequent courses in the design and analysis of algorithms, computability theory, software engineering, and computer systems.Interactive site components can be found on the Unit pages in the

Subjects

6.042 | 6.042 | 18.062 | 18.062 | formal logic notation | formal logic notation | proof methods | proof methods | induction | induction | sets | sets | relations | relations | graph theory | graph theory | integer congruences | integer congruences | asymptotic notation | asymptotic notation | growth of functions | growth of functions | permutations | permutations | combinations | combinations | counting | counting | discrete probability | discrete probability

License

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