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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT) 16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

The course deals with introduction to design of feedback control systems, properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability. It also covers root locus method, nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods. The course deals with introduction to design of feedback control systems, properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability. It also covers root locus method, nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

feedback control systems | feedback control systems | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | stability | root locus method | root locus method | nyquist criterion | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | state space methods | state space methods | time-domain performance measures | time-domain performance measures | frequency-domain performance measures | frequency-domain performance measures | aircraft systems | aircraft systems | spacecraft systems | spacecraft systems | control system analysis | control system analysis | time-domain system design | time-domain system design

License

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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT) 16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the design of feedback control systems as applied to a variety of air and spacecraft systems. Topics include the properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, the Root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods. This course introduces the design of feedback control systems as applied to a variety of air and spacecraft systems. Topics include the properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, the Root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

classical control systems | classical control systems | feedback control systems | feedback control systems | bode plots | bode plots | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | stability | root locus method | root locus method | nyquist criterion | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | state space methods | state space methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.421 Atomic and Optical Physics I (MIT) 8.421 Atomic and Optical Physics I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This is the first of a two-semester subject sequence that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include the interaction of radiation with atoms: resonance; absorption, stimulated and spontaneous emission; methods of resonance, dressed atom formalism, masers and lasers, cavity quantum electrodynamics; structure of simple atoms, behavior in very strong fields; fundamental tests: time reversal, parity violations, Bell's inequalities; and experimental methods. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This is the first of a two-semester subject sequence that provides the foundations for contemporary research in selected areas of atomic and optical physics. Topics covered include the interaction of radiation with atoms: resonance; absorption, stimulated and spontaneous emission; methods of resonance, dressed atom formalism, masers and lasers, cavity quantum electrodynamics; structure of simple atoms, behavior in very strong fields; fundamental tests: time reversal, parity violations, Bell's inequalities; and experimental methods.

Subjects

atom | atom | atomic and optical physics | atomic and optical physics | resonance | resonance | resonance frequency | resonance frequency | harmonic oscillator | harmonic oscillator | oscillation frequency | oscillation frequency | magnetic field | magnetic field | electric field | electric field | Landau-Zener problem | Landau-Zener problem | lamb shift | lamb shift | line broadening | line broadening | coherence | coherence

License

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT) 6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops. This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | feedback system | time-domain performance | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | compensation techniques | internal compensation | internal compensation | external compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | power coverter systems | phase lock loops | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT) 2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered.

Subjects

modeling | modeling | analysis | analysis | dynamic | dynamic | systems | systems | mechanical | mechanical | translation | translation | uniaxial | uniaxial | rotation | rotation | electrical | electrical | circuits | circuits | coupling | coupling | levers | levers | gears | gears | electro-mechanical | electro-mechanical | devices | devices | linear | linear | differential | differential | equations | equations | state-determined | state-determined | Laplace | Laplace | transforms | transforms | transfer | transfer | functions | functions | frequency | frequency | response | response | Bode | Bode | vibrations | vibrations | modal | modal | open-loop | open-loop | closed-loop | closed-loop | control | control | instability | instability | time-domain | time-domain | controller | controller | frequency-domain | frequency-domain

License

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18.327 Wavelets, Filter Banks and Applications (MIT) 18.327 Wavelets, Filter Banks and Applications (MIT)

Description

Wavelets are localized basis functions, good for representing short-time events. The coefficients at each scale are filtered and subsampled to give coefficients at the next scale. This is Mallat's pyramid algorithm for multiresolution, connecting wavelets to filter banks. Wavelets and multiscale algorithms for compression and signal/image processing are developed. Subject is project-based for engineering and scientific applications. Wavelets are localized basis functions, good for representing short-time events. The coefficients at each scale are filtered and subsampled to give coefficients at the next scale. This is Mallat's pyramid algorithm for multiresolution, connecting wavelets to filter banks. Wavelets and multiscale algorithms for compression and signal/image processing are developed. Subject is project-based for engineering and scientific applications.

Subjects

Discrete-time filters | Discrete-time filters | convolution | convolution | Fourier transform | Fourier transform | owpass and highpass filters | owpass and highpass filters | Sampling rate change operations | Sampling rate change operations | upsampling and downsampling | upsampling and downsampling | ractional sampling | ractional sampling | interpolation | interpolation | Filter Banks | Filter Banks | time domain (Haar example) and frequency domain | time domain (Haar example) and frequency domain | conditions for alias cancellation and no distortion | conditions for alias cancellation and no distortion | perfect reconstruction | perfect reconstruction | halfband filters and possible factorizations | halfband filters and possible factorizations | Modulation and polyphase representations | Modulation and polyphase representations | Noble identities | Noble identities | block Toeplitz matrices and block z-transforms | block Toeplitz matrices and block z-transforms | polyphase examples | polyphase examples | Matlab wavelet toolbox | Matlab wavelet toolbox | Orthogonal filter banks | Orthogonal filter banks | paraunitary matrices | paraunitary matrices | orthogonality condition (Condition O) in the time domain | orthogonality condition (Condition O) in the time domain | modulation domain and polyphase domain | modulation domain and polyphase domain | Maxflat filters | Maxflat filters | Daubechies and Meyer formulas | Daubechies and Meyer formulas | Spectral factorization | Spectral factorization | Multiresolution Analysis (MRA) | Multiresolution Analysis (MRA) | requirements for MRA | requirements for MRA | nested spaces and complementary spaces; scaling functions and wavelets | nested spaces and complementary spaces; scaling functions and wavelets | Refinement equation | Refinement equation | iterative and recursive solution techniques | iterative and recursive solution techniques | infinite product formula | infinite product formula | filter bank approach for computing scaling functions and wavelets | filter bank approach for computing scaling functions and wavelets | Orthogonal wavelet bases | Orthogonal wavelet bases | connection to orthogonal filters | connection to orthogonal filters | orthogonality in the frequency domain | orthogonality in the frequency domain | Biorthogonal wavelet bases | Biorthogonal wavelet bases | Mallat pyramid algorithm | Mallat pyramid algorithm | Accuracy of wavelet approximations (Condition A) | Accuracy of wavelet approximations (Condition A) | vanishing moments | vanishing moments | polynomial cancellation in filter banks | polynomial cancellation in filter banks | Smoothness of wavelet bases | Smoothness of wavelet bases | convergence of the cascade algorithm (Condition E) | convergence of the cascade algorithm (Condition E) | splines | splines | Bases vs. frames | Bases vs. frames | Signal and image processing | Signal and image processing | finite length signals | finite length signals | boundary filters and boundary wavelets | boundary filters and boundary wavelets | wavelet compression algorithms | wavelet compression algorithms | Lifting | Lifting | ladder structure for filter banks | ladder structure for filter banks | factorization of polyphase matrix into lifting steps | factorization of polyphase matrix into lifting steps | lifting form of refinement equationSec | lifting form of refinement equationSec | Wavelets and subdivision | Wavelets and subdivision | nonuniform grids | nonuniform grids | multiresolution for triangular meshes | multiresolution for triangular meshes | representation and compression of surfaces | representation and compression of surfaces | Numerical solution of PDEs | Numerical solution of PDEs | Galerkin approximation | Galerkin approximation | wavelet integrals (projection coefficients | moments and connection coefficients) | wavelet integrals (projection coefficients | moments and connection coefficients) | convergence | convergence | Subdivision wavelets for integral equations | Subdivision wavelets for integral equations | Compression and convergence estimates | Compression and convergence estimates | M-band wavelets | M-band wavelets | DFT filter banks and cosine modulated filter banks | DFT filter banks and cosine modulated filter banks | Multiwavelets | Multiwavelets

License

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT) 6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops. This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | feedback system | time-domain performance | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | compensation techniques | internal compensation | internal compensation | external compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | power coverter systems | phase lock loops | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.160 Signals, Systems and Information for Media Technology (MIT) MAS.160 Signals, Systems and Information for Media Technology (MIT)

Description

This class teaches the fundamentals of signals and information theory with emphasis on modeling audio/visual messages and physiologically derived signals, and the human source or recipient. Topics include linear systems, difference equations, Z-transforms, sampling and sampling rate conversion, convolution, filtering, modulation, Fourier analysis, entropy, noise, and Shannon's fundamental theorems. Additional topics may include data compression, filter design, and feature detection. The undergraduate subject MAS.160 meets with the two half-semester graduate subjects MAS.510 and MAS.511, but assignments differ. This class teaches the fundamentals of signals and information theory with emphasis on modeling audio/visual messages and physiologically derived signals, and the human source or recipient. Topics include linear systems, difference equations, Z-transforms, sampling and sampling rate conversion, convolution, filtering, modulation, Fourier analysis, entropy, noise, and Shannon's fundamental theorems. Additional topics may include data compression, filter design, and feature detection. The undergraduate subject MAS.160 meets with the two half-semester graduate subjects MAS.510 and MAS.511, but assignments differ.

Subjects

audio | audio | visual | visual | video | video | A/V | A/V | digital media | digital media | digital audio | digital audio | digital video | digital video | photography | photography | digitial photography | digitial photography | spectrum | spectrum | Spectrum plot | Spectrum plot | amplitude modulation | amplitude modulation | AM | AM | Fourier series | Fourier series | frequency modulation | frequency modulation | FM | FM | orthogonality | orthogonality | Walsh functions | Walsh functions | basis sets. Sampling theorem | basis sets. Sampling theorem | aliasing | aliasing | reconstruction | reconstruction | FFT | FFT | DFT | DFT | DTFT | DTFT | z-transform | z-transform | IIR | IIR | frequency response | frequency response | filter | filter | filter response | filter response | impulse response | impulse response | noise | noise | communications system | communications system | communications theory | communications theory | information theory | information theory | communication channel | communication channel | coding | coding | error correction | error correction | DSP | DSP | signal processing | signal processing | digital signal processing | digital signal processing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT) 6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modelling and compensation of power coverter systems and phase lock loops. This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modelling and compensation of power coverter systems and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | feedback system | time-domain performance | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance | frequency-domain performance | stability | stability | root locus method | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | compensation techniques | internal compensation | internal compensation | external compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | power coverter systems | phase lock loops | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

The course deals with introduction to design of feedback control systems, properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability. It also covers root locus method, nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

feedback control systems | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | root locus method | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | state space methods | time-domain performance measures | frequency-domain performance measures | aircraft systems | spacecraft systems | control system analysis | time-domain system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

The course deals with introduction to design of feedback control systems, properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability. It also covers root locus method, nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

feedback control systems | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | root locus method | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | state space methods | time-domain performance measures | frequency-domain performance measures | aircraft systems | spacecraft systems | control system analysis | time-domain system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

The course deals with introduction to design of feedback control systems, properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability. It also covers root locus method, nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

feedback control systems | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | root locus method | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | state space methods | time-domain performance measures | frequency-domain performance measures | aircraft systems | spacecraft systems | control system analysis | time-domain system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.31 Feedback Control Systems (MIT) 16.31 Feedback Control Systems (MIT)

Description

This course covers the fundamentals of control design and analysis using state-space methods. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic. By the end of the course, the student should be able to design controllers using state-space methods and evaluate whether these controllers are robust. This course covers the fundamentals of control design and analysis using state-space methods. This includes both the practical and theoretical aspects of the topic. By the end of the course, the student should be able to design controllers using state-space methods and evaluate whether these controllers are robust.

Subjects

linear system response | linear system response | aircraft control | aircraft control | frequency response methods | frequency response methods | Nyquist stability theorem | Nyquist stability theorem | bode plots | bode plots | state-space systems | state-space systems | full-state feedback control | full-state feedback control | open-loop estimators | open-loop estimators | closed-loop estimators | closed-loop estimators | robustness analysis | robustness analysis | small gain theorem | small gain theorem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers. This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.30 Estimation and Control of Aerospace Systems (MIT) 16.30 Estimation and Control of Aerospace Systems (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on the design of control systems. Topics covered include: frequency domain and state space techniques; control law design using Nyquist diagrams and Bode plots; state feedback, state estimation, and the design of dynamic control laws; and elementary analysis of nonlinearities and their impact on control design. There is extensive use of computer-aided control design tools. Applications to various aerospace systems, including navigation, guidance, and control of vehicles, are also discussed. This course focuses on the design of control systems. Topics covered include: frequency domain and state space techniques; control law design using Nyquist diagrams and Bode plots; state feedback, state estimation, and the design of dynamic control laws; and elementary analysis of nonlinearities and their impact on control design. There is extensive use of computer-aided control design tools. Applications to various aerospace systems, including navigation, guidance, and control of vehicles, are also discussed.

Subjects

estimation of aerospace systems | estimation of aerospace systems | control of aerospace systems | control of aerospace systems | control systems | control systems | frequency domain | frequency domain | state space | state space | control law design | control law design | Nyquist diagram | Nyquist diagram | Bode plot | Bode plot | state feedback | state feedback | state estimation | state estimation | dynamic control | dynamic control | nonlinearities | nonlinearities | nonlinearity | nonlinearity | control design | control design | computer-aided control design | computer-aided control design | feedback control system | feedback control system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.301 Solid-State Circuits (MIT) 6.301 Solid-State Circuits (MIT)

Description

This course covers analog circuit analysis and design, focusing on the tools and methods necessary for the creative design of useful circuits using active devices. The class stresses insight and intuition, applied to the design of transistor circuits and the estimation of their performance. The course concentrates on circuits using the bipolar junction transistor, but the techniques that are studied can be equally applied to circuits using JFETs, MOSFETs, MESFETs, future exotic devices, or even vacuum tubes. This course covers analog circuit analysis and design, focusing on the tools and methods necessary for the creative design of useful circuits using active devices. The class stresses insight and intuition, applied to the design of transistor circuits and the estimation of their performance. The course concentrates on circuits using the bipolar junction transistor, but the techniques that are studied can be equally applied to circuits using JFETs, MOSFETs, MESFETs, future exotic devices, or even vacuum tubes.

Subjects

solid state circuits | solid state circuits | analog | analog | circuit | circuit | transistor | transistor | bipolar junction transistor | bipolar junction transistor | JFET | JFET | MOSFET | MOSFET | MESFET | MESFET | vacuum tubes | vacuum tubes | single-transistor common-emitter amplifier | single-transistor common-emitter amplifier | op amps | op amps | multipliers | multipliers | references | references | high speed logic | high speed logic | high-frequency analysis | high-frequency analysis | open-circuit time constants | open-circuit time constants | transimpedance amps | transimpedance amps | translinear circuits | translinear circuits | bandgap references | bandgap references | charge control model | charge control model

License

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MAS.160 Signals, Systems and Information for Media Technology (MIT)

Description

This class teaches the fundamentals of signals and information theory with emphasis on modeling audio/visual messages and physiologically derived signals, and the human source or recipient. Topics include linear systems, difference equations, Z-transforms, sampling and sampling rate conversion, convolution, filtering, modulation, Fourier analysis, entropy, noise, and Shannon's fundamental theorems. Additional topics may include data compression, filter design, and feature detection. The undergraduate subject MAS.160 meets with the two half-semester graduate subjects MAS.510 and MAS.511, but assignments differ.

Subjects

audio | visual | video | A/V | digital media | digital audio | digital video | photography | digitial photography | spectrum | Spectrum plot | amplitude modulation | AM | Fourier series | frequency modulation | FM | orthogonality | Walsh functions | basis sets. Sampling theorem | aliasing | reconstruction | FFT | DFT | DTFT | z-transform | IIR | frequency response | filter | filter response | impulse response | noise | communications system | communications theory | information theory | communication channel | coding | error correction | DSP | signal processing | digital signal processing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT) 6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. 6.002 introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points.

Subjects

circuit | circuit | electronic | electronic | abstraction | abstraction | lumped circuit | lumped circuit | digital | digital | amplifier | amplifier | differential equations | differential equations | time behavior | time behavior | energy storage | energy storage | semiconductor diode | semiconductor diode | field-effect | field-effect | field-effect transistor | field-effect transistor | resistor | resistor | source | source | inductor | inductor | capacitor | capacitor | diode | diode | series-parallel reduction | series-parallel reduction | voltage | voltage | current divider | current divider | node method | node method | linearity | linearity | superposition | superposition | Thevenin-Norton equivalent | Thevenin-Norton equivalent | power flow | power flow | Boolean algebra | Boolean algebra | binary signal | binary signal | MOSFET | MOSFET | noise margin | noise margin | singularity functions | singularity functions | sinusoidal-steady-state | sinusoidal-steady-state | impedance | impedance | frequency response curves | frequency response curves | operational amplifier | operational amplifier | Op-Amp | Op-Amp | negative feedback | negative feedback | positive feedback | positive feedback

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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1.258J Public Transportation Service and Operations Planning (MIT) 1.258J Public Transportation Service and Operations Planning (MIT)

Description

This course describes the evolution and role of urban public transportation modes, systems, and services, focusing on bus and rail. Technological characteristics and their impacts on capacity, service quality, and cost are described. Current practice and new methods for data collection and analysis, performance monitoring, route design, frequency determination, and vehicle and crew scheduling are also discussed. In addition, the effect of pricing policy and service quality on ridership and methods for estimating costs associated with proposed service changes are presented together with means to improve operations through real time intervention. This course describes the evolution and role of urban public transportation modes, systems, and services, focusing on bus and rail. Technological characteristics and their impacts on capacity, service quality, and cost are described. Current practice and new methods for data collection and analysis, performance monitoring, route design, frequency determination, and vehicle and crew scheduling are also discussed. In addition, the effect of pricing policy and service quality on ridership and methods for estimating costs associated with proposed service changes are presented together with means to improve operations through real time intervention.

Subjects

urban public transportation modes | urban public transportation modes | systems | systems | services | services | bus | bus | rail | rail | capacity | capacity | service quality | service quality | cost | cost | data collection | data collection | analysis | analysis | performance monitoring | performance monitoring | route design | route design | frequency determination | frequency determination | vehicle scheduling | vehicle scheduling | crew scheduling | crew scheduling | pricing policy | pricing policy | ridership | ridership | estimating costs | estimating costs | 1.258 | 1.258 | 11.541 | 11.541 | ESD.226 | ESD.226

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.101 Introductory Analog Electronics Laboratory (MIT) 6.101 Introductory Analog Electronics Laboratory (MIT)

Description

6.101 is an introductory experimental laboratory that explores the design, construction, and debugging of analog electronic circuits. Lectures and six laboratory projects investigate the performance characteristics of diodes, transistors, JFETs, and op-amps, including the construction of a small audio amplifier and preamplifier. Seven weeks are devoted to the design and implementation, and written and oral presentation of a project in an environment similar to that of engineering design teams in industry. The course provides opportunity to simulate real-world problems and solutions that involve trade offs and the use of engineering judgment. Engineers from local analog engineering companies come to campus to help students with their design projects. 6.101 is an introductory experimental laboratory that explores the design, construction, and debugging of analog electronic circuits. Lectures and six laboratory projects investigate the performance characteristics of diodes, transistors, JFETs, and op-amps, including the construction of a small audio amplifier and preamplifier. Seven weeks are devoted to the design and implementation, and written and oral presentation of a project in an environment similar to that of engineering design teams in industry. The course provides opportunity to simulate real-world problems and solutions that involve trade offs and the use of engineering judgment. Engineers from local analog engineering companies come to campus to help students with their design projects.

Subjects

analog electronic circuits | analog electronic circuits | diode characteristics | diode characteristics | transistors | transistors | JFETs | JFETs | op-amps | op-amps | audio amplifier | audio amplifier | preamplifier | preamplifier | audio and radio frequency circuits | audio and radio frequency circuits | electronic test equipment | electronic test equipment | digital multimeter | digital multimeter | oscilloscope | oscilloscope | function generator | function generator | curve tracer | curve tracer

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT) 6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. The 6.002 content was created collabora 6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Points. The 6.002 content was created collabora

Subjects

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Resistive elements and networks | Resistive elements and networks | independent and dependent sources | independent and dependent sources | switches and MOS devices | switches and MOS devices | digital abstraction | digital abstraction | amplifiers | amplifiers | and energy storage elements | and energy storage elements | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | design in the time and frequency domains | design in the time and frequency domains | analog and digital circuits and applications | analog and digital circuits and applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT)

Description

This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered.

Subjects

modeling | analysis | dynamic | systems | mechanical | translation | uniaxial | rotation | electrical | circuits | coupling | levers | gears | electro-mechanical | devices | linear | differential | equations | state-determined | Laplace | transforms | transfer | functions | frequency | response | Bode | vibrations | modal | open-loop | closed-loop | control | instability | time-domain | controller | frequency-domain

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT) 6.002 Circuits and Electronics (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Poin Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. 6.002 is designed to serve as a first course in an undergraduate electrical engineering (EE), or electrical engineering and computer science (EECS) curriculum. At MIT, 6.002 is in the core of department subjects required for all undergraduates in EECS. The course introduces the fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction. Topics covered include: resistive elements and networks; independent and dependent sources; switches and MOS transistors; digital abstraction; amplifiers; energy storage elements; dynamics of first- and second-order networks; design in the time and frequency domains; and analog and digital circuits and applications. Design and lab exercises are also significant components of the course. 6.002 is worth 4 Engineering Design Poin

Subjects

Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Fundamentals of the lumped circuit abstraction | Resistive elements and networks | Resistive elements and networks | independent and dependent sources | independent and dependent sources | switches and MOS devices | switches and MOS devices | digital abstraction | digital abstraction | amplifiers | amplifiers | and energy storage elements | and energy storage elements | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | Dynamics of first- and second-order networks | design in the time and frequency domains | design in the time and frequency domains | analog and digital circuits and applications | analog and digital circuits and applications

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT)

Description

This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered.

Subjects

modeling | analysis | dynamic | systems | mechanical | translation | uniaxial | rotation | electrical | circuits | coupling | levers | gears | electro-mechanical | devices | linear | differential | equations | state-determined | Laplace | transforms | transfer | functions | frequency | response | Bode | vibrations | modal | open-loop | closed-loop | control | instability | time-domain | controller | frequency-domain

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005. Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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