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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT) 16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

The course deals with introduction to design of feedback control systems, properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability. It also covers root locus method, nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods. The course deals with introduction to design of feedback control systems, properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability. It also covers root locus method, nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

feedback control systems | feedback control systems | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | stability | root locus method | root locus method | nyquist criterion | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | state space methods | state space methods | time-domain performance measures | time-domain performance measures | frequency-domain performance measures | frequency-domain performance measures | aircraft systems | aircraft systems | spacecraft systems | spacecraft systems | control system analysis | control system analysis | time-domain system design | time-domain system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT) 16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the design of feedback control systems as applied to a variety of air and spacecraft systems. Topics include the properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, the Root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods. This course introduces the design of feedback control systems as applied to a variety of air and spacecraft systems. Topics include the properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, the Root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

classical control systems | classical control systems | feedback control systems | feedback control systems | bode plots | bode plots | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | stability | root locus method | root locus method | nyquist criterion | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | state space methods | state space methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT) 6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops. This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | feedback system | time-domain performance | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | compensation techniques | internal compensation | internal compensation | external compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | power coverter systems | phase lock loops | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT) 6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops. This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | feedback system | time-domain performance | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | compensation techniques | internal compensation | internal compensation | external compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | power coverter systems | phase lock loops | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT) 6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modelling and compensation of power coverter systems and phase lock loops. This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modelling and compensation of power coverter systems and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | feedback system | time-domain performance | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance | frequency-domain performance | stability | stability | root locus method | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | compensation techniques | internal compensation | internal compensation | external compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | power coverter systems | phase lock loops | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

The course deals with introduction to design of feedback control systems, properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability. It also covers root locus method, nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

feedback control systems | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | root locus method | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | state space methods | time-domain performance measures | frequency-domain performance measures | aircraft systems | spacecraft systems | control system analysis | time-domain system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

The course deals with introduction to design of feedback control systems, properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability. It also covers root locus method, nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

feedback control systems | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | root locus method | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | state space methods | time-domain performance measures | frequency-domain performance measures | aircraft systems | spacecraft systems | control system analysis | time-domain system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

The course deals with introduction to design of feedback control systems, properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability. It also covers root locus method, nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

feedback control systems | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | root locus method | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | state space methods | time-domain performance measures | frequency-domain performance measures | aircraft systems | spacecraft systems | control system analysis | time-domain system design

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers. This course covers algebraic approaches to electromagnetism and nano-photonics. Topics include photonic crystals, waveguides, perturbation theory, diffraction, computational methods, applications to integrated optical devices, and fiber-optic systems. Emphasis is placed on abstract algebraic approaches rather than detailed solutions of partial differential equations, the latter being done by computers.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT) 18.369 Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics (MIT)

Description

Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005. Find out what solid-state physics has brought to Electromagnetism in the last 20 years. This course surveys the physics and mathematics of nanophotonics—electromagnetic waves in media structured on the scale of the wavelength. Topics include computational methods combined with high-level algebraic techniques borrowed from solid-state quantum mechanics: linear algebra and eigensystems, group theory, Bloch's theorem and conservation laws, perturbation methods, and coupled-mode theories, to understand surprising optical phenomena from band gaps to slow light to nonlinear filters. Note: An earlier version of this course was published on OCW as 18.325 Topics in Applied Mathematics: Mathematical Methods in Nanophotonics, Fall 2005.

Subjects

linear algebra | linear algebra | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | eigensystems for Maxwell's equations | symmetry groups | symmetry groups | representation theory | representation theory | Bloch's theorem | Bloch's theorem | numerical eigensolver methods | numerical eigensolver methods | time and frequency-domain computation | time and frequency-domain computation | perturbation theory | perturbation theory | coupled-mode theories | coupled-mode theories | waveguide theory | waveguide theory | adiabatic transitions | adiabatic transitions | Optical phenomena | Optical phenomena | photonic crystals | photonic crystals | band gaps | band gaps | anomalous diffraction | anomalous diffraction | mechanisms for optical confinement | mechanisms for optical confinement | optical fibers | optical fibers | integrated optical devices | integrated optical devices

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modelling and compensation of power coverter systems and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance | stability | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | internal compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT) 2.003 Modeling Dynamics and Control I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course is the first of a two term sequence in modeling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. The various topics covered are as follows: mechanical translation, uniaxial rotation, electrical circuits and their coupling via levers, gears and electro-mechanical devices, analytical and computational solution of linear differential equations, state-determined systems, Laplace transforms, transfer functions, frequency response, Bode plots, vibrations, modal analysis, open- and closed-loop control, instability, time-domain controller design, and introduction to frequency-domain control design techniques. Case studies of engineering applications are also covered.

Subjects

modeling | modeling | analysis | analysis | dynamic | dynamic | systems | systems | mechanical | mechanical | translation | translation | uniaxial | uniaxial | rotation | rotation | electrical | electrical | circuits | circuits | coupling | coupling | levers | levers | gears | gears | electro-mechanical | electro-mechanical | devices | devices | linear | linear | differential | differential | equations | equations | state-determined | state-determined | Laplace | Laplace | transforms | transforms | transfer | transfer | functions | functions | frequency | frequency | response | response | Bode | Bode | vibrations | vibrations | modal | modal | open-loop | open-loop | closed-loop | closed-loop | control | control | instability | instability | time-domain | time-domain | controller | controller | frequency-domain | frequency-domain

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | internal compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | internal compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | internal compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.341 Discrete-Time Signal Processing (MIT) 6.341 Discrete-Time Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This class addresses the representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems. The major concepts covered include: Discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, and sampling rate conversion; flowgraph structures for DT systems; time-and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters; linear prediction; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks; multirate techniques; Hilbert transforms; Cepstral analysis and various applications. Acknowledgements I would like to express my thanks to Thomas Baran, Myung Jin Choi, and Xiaomeng Shi for compiling the lecture notes on this site from my individual lectures and handouts and their class notes during the semest This class addresses the representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems. The major concepts covered include: Discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, and sampling rate conversion; flowgraph structures for DT systems; time-and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters; linear prediction; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks; multirate techniques; Hilbert transforms; Cepstral analysis and various applications. Acknowledgements I would like to express my thanks to Thomas Baran, Myung Jin Choi, and Xiaomeng Shi for compiling the lecture notes on this site from my individual lectures and handouts and their class notes during the semest

Subjects

discrete time signals and systems | discrete time signals and systems | discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals | discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals | decimation | decimation | interpolation | interpolation | sampling rate conversion | sampling rate conversion | Flowgraph structures | Flowgraph structures | time- and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters | time- and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters | linear prediction | linear prediction | Discrete Fourier transform | Discrete Fourier transform | FFT algorithm | FFT algorithm | Short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks | Short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks | Multirate techniques | Multirate techniques | Hilbert transforms | Hilbert transforms | Cepstral analysis | Cepstral analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.04A Systems and Controls (MIT) 2.04A Systems and Controls (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to linear systems, transfer functions, and Laplace transforms. It covers stability and feedback, and provides basic design tools for specifications of transient response. It also briefly covers frequency-domain techniques.   This course provides an introduction to linear systems, transfer functions, and Laplace transforms. It covers stability and feedback, and provides basic design tools for specifications of transient response. It also briefly covers frequency-domain techniques.  

Subjects

systems | systems | controls | controls | ordinary differential equations | ordinary differential equations | ODEs | ODEs | differential equations | differential equations | Laplace | Laplace | transfer function | transfer function | flywheel | flywheel | circuits | circuits | impedance | impedance | feedback | feedback | root locus | root locus | linear systems | linear systems | Laplace transforms | Laplace transforms | stability | stability | frequency-domain | frequency-domain | skyscaper | skyscaper

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.302 Feedback Systems (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the design of feedback systems. Topics covered include: properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, compensation techniques, application to a wide variety of physical systems, internal and external compensation of operational amplifiers, modeling and compensation of power converter systems, and phase lock loops.

Subjects

feedback system | time-domain performance | frequency-domain performance. stability | root locus method | Nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | compensation techniques | internal compensation | external compensation | operational amplifiers | power coverter systems | phase lock loops

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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16.06 Principles of Automatic Control (MIT)

Description

This course introduces the design of feedback control systems as applied to a variety of air and spacecraft systems. Topics include the properties and advantages of feedback systems, time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures, stability and degree of stability, the Root locus method, Nyquist criterion, frequency-domain design, and state space methods.

Subjects

classical control systems | feedback control systems | bode plots | time-domain and frequency-domain performance measures | stability | root locus method | nyquist criterion | frequency-domain design | state space methods

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.341 Discrete-Time Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This class addresses the representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems. The major concepts covered include: Discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, and sampling rate conversion; flowgraph structures for DT systems; time-and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters; linear prediction; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks; multirate techniques; Hilbert transforms; Cepstral analysis and various applications. Acknowledgements I would like to express my thanks to Thomas Baran, Myung Jin Choi, and Xiaomeng Shi for compiling the lecture notes on this site from my individual lectures and handouts and their class notes during the semes

Subjects

discrete time signals and systems | discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals | decimation | interpolation | sampling rate conversion | Flowgraph structures | time- and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters | linear prediction | Discrete Fourier transform | FFT algorithm | Short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks | Multirate techniques | Hilbert transforms | Cepstral analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.341 Discrete-Time Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This class addresses the representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems. The major concepts covered include: Discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, and sampling rate conversion; flowgraph structures for DT systems; time-and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters; linear prediction; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks; multirate techniques; Hilbert transforms; Cepstral analysis and various applications. Acknowledgements I would like to express my thanks to Thomas Baran, Myung Jin Choi, and Xiaomeng Shi for compiling the lecture notes on this site from my individual lectures and handouts and their class notes during the semes

Subjects

discrete time signals and systems | discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals | decimation | interpolation | sampling rate conversion | Flowgraph structures | time- and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters | linear prediction | Discrete Fourier transform | FFT algorithm | Short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks | Multirate techniques | Hilbert transforms | Cepstral analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.341 Discrete-Time Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This class addresses the representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems. The major concepts covered include: Discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, and sampling rate conversion; flowgraph structures for DT systems; time-and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters; linear prediction; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks; multirate techniques; Hilbert transforms; Cepstral analysis and various applications. Acknowledgements I would like to express my thanks to Thomas Baran, Myung Jin Choi, and Xiaomeng Shi for compiling the lecture notes on this site from my individual lectures and handouts and their class notes during the semes

Subjects

discrete time signals and systems | discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals | decimation | interpolation | sampling rate conversion | Flowgraph structures | time- and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters | linear prediction | Discrete Fourier transform | FFT algorithm | Short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks | Multirate techniques | Hilbert transforms | Cepstral analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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6.341 Discrete-Time Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This class addresses the representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems. The major concepts covered include: Discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, and sampling rate conversion; flowgraph structures for DT systems; time-and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters; linear prediction; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks; multirate techniques; Hilbert transforms; Cepstral analysis and various applications. Acknowledgements I would like to express my thanks to Thomas Baran, Myung Jin Choi, and Xiaomeng Shi for compiling the lecture notes on this site from my individual lectures and handouts and their class notes during the semes

Subjects

discrete time signals and systems | discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals | decimation | interpolation | sampling rate conversion | Flowgraph structures | time- and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters | linear prediction | Discrete Fourier transform | FFT algorithm | Short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks | Multirate techniques | Hilbert transforms | Cepstral analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allthaicourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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6.341 Discrete-Time Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This class addresses the representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems. The major concepts covered include: Discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, and sampling rate conversion; flowgraph structures for DT systems; time-and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters; linear prediction; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks; multirate techniques; Hilbert transforms; Cepstral analysis and various applications. Acknowledgements I would like to express my thanks to Thomas Baran, Myung Jin Choi, and Xiaomeng Shi for compiling the lecture notes on this site from my individual lectures and handouts and their class notes during the semes

Subjects

discrete time signals and systems | discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals | decimation | interpolation | sampling rate conversion | Flowgraph structures | time- and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters | linear prediction | Discrete Fourier transform | FFT algorithm | Short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks | Multirate techniques | Hilbert transforms | Cepstral analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allthaicourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

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6.341 Discrete-Time Signal Processing (MIT)

Description

This class addresses the representation, analysis, and design of discrete time signals and systems. The major concepts covered include: Discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals; decimation, interpolation, and sampling rate conversion; flowgraph structures for DT systems; time-and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters; linear prediction; discrete Fourier transform, FFT algorithm; short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks; multirate techniques; Hilbert transforms; Cepstral analysis and various applications. Acknowledgements I would like to express my thanks to Thomas Baran, Myung Jin Choi, and Xiaomeng Shi for compiling the lecture notes on this site from my individual lectures and handouts and their class notes during the semes

Subjects

discrete time signals and systems | discrete-time processing of continuous-time signals | decimation | interpolation | sampling rate conversion | Flowgraph structures | time- and frequency-domain design techniques for recursive (IIR) and non-recursive (FIR) filters | linear prediction | Discrete Fourier transform | FFT algorithm | Short-time Fourier analysis and filter banks | Multirate techniques | Hilbert transforms | Cepstral analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allthaicourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

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