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22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT) 22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers. This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | core design criteria | core design criteria | in-core aspects | in-core aspects | nuclear fuel cycle | nuclear fuel cycle | operations | operations | economics | economics | fast reactors | fast reactors | CANDU physics | CANDU physics | fuel cycle | fuel cycle | coupled reactor analysis | coupled reactor analysis | fuel manufacturing and design | fuel manufacturing and design | thorium fuel cycles | thorium fuel cycles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.60 Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion (MIT) 2.60 Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermomechanical, thermochemical, electrochemical, and photoelectric processes in existing and future power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, environmental impact and performance. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, hydrogen, nuclear and renewable resources, over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, hybrids, catalysis, supercritical and combined cycles, photovoltaics, etc. The course also deals with different forms of energy storage and transmission, and optimal source utilization This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermomechanical, thermochemical, electrochemical, and photoelectric processes in existing and future power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, environmental impact and performance. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, hydrogen, nuclear and renewable resources, over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, hybrids, catalysis, supercritical and combined cycles, photovoltaics, etc. The course also deals with different forms of energy storage and transmission, and optimal source utilization

Subjects

Thermodynamics | Thermodynamics | chemistry | chemistry | flow | flow | transport processes | transport processes | energy systems | energy systems | energy conversion in thermomechanical | thermochemical | electrochemical | energy conversion in thermomechanical | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | and photoelectric processes | power and transportation systems | power and transportation systems | efficiency | efficiency | environmental impact | environmental impact | performance | performance | fossil fuels | fossil fuels | hydrogen resources | hydrogen resources | nuclear resources | nuclear resources | renewable resources | renewable resources | fuel reforming | fuel reforming | hydrogen and synthetic fuel production | hydrogen and synthetic fuel production | fuel cells and batteries | fuel cells and batteries | combustion | combustion | hybrids | hybrids | catalysis | catalysis | supercritical and combined cycles | supercritical and combined cycles | photovoltaics | photovoltaics | energy storage and transmission | energy storage and transmission | Optimal source utilization | Optimal source utilization | fuel-life cycle analysis. | fuel-life cycle analysis. | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | 2.62 | 2.62 | 10.392 | 10.392 | 22.40 | 22.40

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT) 22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

In-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors are presented. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers. In-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors are presented. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel cycle | nuclear fuel cycle | uranium supply | uranium supply | enrichment fuel fabrication | enrichment fuel fabrication | in-core physics | in-core physics | fuel cycle economics | fuel cycle economics | applied reactor physics | applied reactor physics | Nonproliferation aspects | Nonproliferation aspects | disposal of excess weapons plutonium | disposal of excess weapons plutonium | transmutation of actinides | transmutation of actinides | fission products | fission products | spent fuel | spent fuel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT) 22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers. This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel cycle | nuclear fuel cycle | thorium fuel | thorium fuel | dry recycling | dry recycling | transmutation | transmutation | radioactive waste disposal | radioactive waste disposal | waste storage | waste storage | nuclear waste | nuclear waste | nuclear reactor analysis | nuclear reactor analysis | fuel cell design | fuel cell design | reactor design | reactor design | fast reactors | fast reactors | breeder reactors | breeder reactors | CANDU reactor | CANDU reactor | light water reactor | light water reactor | LWR | LWR | nuclear non-proliferation | nuclear non-proliferation | plutonium recycling | plutonium recycling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.60 Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermomechanical, thermochemical, electrochemical, and photoelectric processes in existing and future power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, environmental impact and performance. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, hydrogen, nuclear and renewable resources, over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, hybrids, catalysis, supercritical and combined cycles, photovoltaics, etc. The course also deals with different forms of energy storage and transmission, and optimal source utilization

Subjects

Thermodynamics | chemistry | flow | transport processes | energy systems | energy conversion in thermomechanical | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | power and transportation systems | efficiency | environmental impact | performance | fossil fuels | hydrogen resources | nuclear resources | renewable resources | fuel reforming | hydrogen and synthetic fuel production | fuel cells and batteries | combustion | hybrids | catalysis | supercritical and combined cycles | photovoltaics | energy storage and transmission | Optimal source utilization | fuel-life cycle analysis. | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | 2.62 | 10.392 | 22.40

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.60 Fundamentals of Advanced Energy Conversion (MIT)

Description

This course covers fundamentals of thermodynamics, chemistry, flow and transport processes as applied to energy systems. Topics include analysis of energy conversion in thermomechanical, thermochemical, electrochemical, and photoelectric processes in existing and future power and transportation systems, with emphasis on efficiency, environmental impact and performance. Systems utilizing fossil fuels, hydrogen, nuclear and renewable resources, over a range of sizes and scales are discussed. Applications include fuel reforming, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production, fuel cells and batteries, combustion, hybrids, catalysis, supercritical and combined cycles, photovoltaics, etc. The course also deals with different forms of energy storage and transmission, and optimal source utilization

Subjects

Thermodynamics | chemistry | flow | transport processes | energy systems | energy conversion in thermomechanical | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | power and transportation systems | efficiency | environmental impact | performance | fossil fuels | hydrogen resources | nuclear resources | renewable resources | fuel reforming | hydrogen and synthetic fuel production | fuel cells and batteries | combustion | hybrids | catalysis | supercritical and combined cycles | photovoltaics | energy storage and transmission | Optimal source utilization | fuel-life cycle analysis. | thermochemical | electrochemical | and photoelectric processes | 2.62 | 10.392 | 22.40

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel | core design criteria | in-core aspects | nuclear fuel cycle | operations | economics | fast reactors | CANDU physics | fuel cycle | coupled reactor analysis | fuel manufacturing and design | thorium fuel cycles

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT) 10.391J Sustainable Energy (MIT)

Description

This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the This course assesses current and potential future energy systems, covers resources, extraction, conversion, and end-use, and emphasizes meeting regional and global energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner. Different renewable and conventional energy technologies will be presented including biomass energy, fossil fuels, geothermal energy, nuclear power, wind power, solar energy, hydrogen fuel, and fusion energy and their attributes described within a framework that aids in evaluation and analysis of energy technology systems in the context of political, social, economic, and environmental goals. This course is offered during the last two weeks of the Independent Activities Period (IAP), which is a special 4-week term at MIT that runs from the first week of January until the

Subjects

Assessment of energy systems | Assessment of energy systems | resources | resources | extraction | extraction | conversion | conversion | and end-use | and end-use | regional and global energy needs | regional and global energy needs | 21st century | 21st century | sustainable manner | sustainable manner | renewable and conventional energy technologies | renewable and conventional energy technologies | biomass energy | biomass energy | fossil fuels | fossil fuels | geothermal energy | geothermal energy | nuclear power | nuclear power | wind power | wind power | solar energy | solar energy | hydrogen fuel | hydrogen fuel | fusion energy | fusion energy | analysis of energy technology systems | analysis of energy technology systems | political | political | social | social | economic | economic | environment | environment

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Chemical and Environmental Behaviour of Materials: Fuel Cells

Description

This set of animations demonstrates the principles of a solid oxide fuel cell and a proton exchange membrane cell. From TLP: Fuel Cells

Subjects

fuel cells | SOFC | PEMFC | Solid oxide fuel cell | Proton exchange membrane fuel cell | polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell | DoITPoMS | University of Cambridge | animation | corematerials | ukoer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Energy in the Future: Brenda Boardman

Description

Part 3 of 3. Some of Oxford's leading experts discuss the issue of energy in the future, one of the greatest challenges facing the world as we move through the 21st century. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | 2011-09-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Energy in the Future: Nick Eyre

Description

Part 2 of 3. Some of Oxford's leading experts discuss the issue of energy in the future, one of the greatest challenges facing the world as we move through the 21st century. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | 2011-09-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Energy in the Future: James Marrow

Description

Part 1 of 3. Some of Oxford's leading experts discuss the issue of energy in the future, one of the greatest challenges facing the world as we move through the 21st century. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | 2011-09-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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22.251 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Also covered are the principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel | nuclear fuel cycle | thorium fuel | dry recycling | transmutation | radioactive waste disposal | waste storage | nuclear waste | nuclear reactor analysis | fuel cell design | reactor design | fast reactors | breeder reactors | CANDU reactor | light water reactor | LWR | nuclear non-proliferation | plutonium recycling

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT) 2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT)

Description

This course elaborates on the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact, study of fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, relevant to engine power, efficiency, and emissions, examination of design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. The project section details the Engine Laboratory project. We have aimed this course for graduate and senior undergraduate students. This course elaborates on the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact, study of fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, relevant to engine power, efficiency, and emissions, examination of design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. The project section details the Engine Laboratory project. We have aimed this course for graduate and senior undergraduate students.

Subjects

internal combustion engines | internal combustion engines | engine operation | engine operation | engine fuel requirements | engine fuel requirements | environmental impact | environmental impact | fluid flow | fluid flow | thermodynamics | thermodynamics | combustion | combustion | heat transfer and friction phenomena | heat transfer and friction phenomena | fuel properties | fuel properties | power | power | efficiency | efficiency | emissions | emissions | spark-ignition | spark-ignition | diesel | diesel | stratified-charge | stratified-charge | mixed-cycle engine. | mixed-cycle engine.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Energy in the Future: Brenda Boardman

Description

Part 3 of 3. Some of Oxford's leading experts discuss the issue of energy in the future, one of the greatest challenges facing the world as we move through the 21st century. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | 2011-09-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Energy in the Future: Nick Eyre

Description

Part 2 of 3. Some of Oxford's leading experts discuss the issue of energy in the future, one of the greatest challenges facing the world as we move through the 21st century. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | 2011-09-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Energy in the Future: James Marrow

Description

Part 1 of 3. Some of Oxford's leading experts discuss the issue of energy in the future, one of the greatest challenges facing the world as we move through the 21st century. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | fossil fuel | climate change | Energy | global warming | 21st century challenges | fossil fuels | alumni weekend | 2011-09-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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s Planet: Reconnecting climate science, climate policy and reality

Description

Myles Allen (Professor of Geosystem Science, School of Geography and the Environment and Department of Physics) delivers his inaugural lecture on 28 Nov 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

climate | fossil fuel | Energy | government | global warming | policy | fossil fuels | change | climate | fossil fuel | Energy | government | global warming | policy | fossil fuels | change | 2011-11-28

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Biofuels Biofuels

Description

This free course, Biofuels, investigates what is meant by a biofuel and covers the advantages of using biofuels compared with fossil fuels. The different types of biofuel are explored, with particular emphasis on transport biofuels. Finally, the issue of whether biofuels are the complete answer to our future energy needs is considered. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Biofuels. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Biofuels, investigates what is meant by a biofuel and covers the advantages of using biofuels compared with fossil fuels. The different types of biofuel are explored, with particular emphasis on transport biofuels. Finally, the issue of whether biofuels are the complete answer to our future energy needs is considered. First published on Mon, 21 Mar 2016 as Biofuels. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Science | Science | biofuels | biofuels | photosynthesis | photosynthesis | energy | energy | fuel | fuel | climate | climate | change | change | global warming | global warming | biogas | biogas | wood | wood | S173_1 | S173_1

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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s Planet: Reconnecting climate science, climate policy and reality

Description

Myles Allen (Professor of Geosystem Science, School of Geography and the Environment and Department of Physics) delivers his inaugural lecture on 28 Nov 2011. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

climate | fossil fuel | Energy | government | global warming | policy | fossil fuels | change | climate | fossil fuel | Energy | government | global warming | policy | fossil fuels | change | 2011-11-28

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (MIT)

Description

In-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, reprocessing and waste disposal. Principles of fuel cycle economics and the applied reactor physics of both contemporary and proposed thermal and fast reactors are presented. Nonproliferation aspects, disposal of excess weapons plutonium, and transmutation of actinides and selected fission products in spent fuel are examined. Several state-of-the-art computer programs are provided for student use in problem sets and term papers.

Subjects

nuclear fuel cycle | uranium supply | enrichment fuel fabrication | in-core physics | fuel cycle economics | applied reactor physics | Nonproliferation aspects | disposal of excess weapons plutonium | transmutation of actinides | fission products | spent fuel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Chemical and Environmental Behaviour of Materials: Fuel Cells

Description

This set of animations demonstrates the principles of a solid oxide fuel cell and a proton exchange membrane cell. From TLP: Fuel Cells

Subjects

fuel cells | sofc | pemfc | solid oxide fuel cell | proton exchange membrane fuel cell | polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell | doitpoms | university of cambridge | animation | corematerials | ukoer | Engineering | H000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT) 2.61 Internal Combustion Engines (MIT)

Description

This course studies the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact. Topics include fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, with reference to engine power, efficiency, and emissions. Students examine the design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. Class includes lab project in the Engine Laboratory. This course studies the fundamentals of how the design and operation of internal combustion engines affect their performance, operation, fuel requirements, and environmental impact. Topics include fluid flow, thermodynamics, combustion, heat transfer and friction phenomena, and fuel properties, with reference to engine power, efficiency, and emissions. Students examine the design features and operating characteristics of different types of internal combustion engines: spark-ignition, diesel, stratified-charge, and mixed-cycle engines. Class includes lab project in the Engine Laboratory.

Subjects

internal combustion engines | internal combustion engines | engine operation | engine operation | engine fuel requirements | engine fuel requirements | environmental impact | environmental impact | fluid flow | thermodynamics | combustion | heat transfer and friction phenomena | fluid flow | thermodynamics | combustion | heat transfer and friction phenomena | fuel properties | fuel properties | power | power | efficiency | efficiency | emissions | emissions | spark-ignition | spark-ignition | diesel | diesel | stratified-charge | stratified-charge | mixed-cycle engine | mixed-cycle engine | full lecture notes | full lecture notes

License

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2.625 Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage: Fundamentals, Materials, and Applications (MIT) 2.625 Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage: Fundamentals, Materials, and Applications (MIT)

Description

This course will introduce students to the principles, performance, and challenges of electrochemical and photoelectrochemical devices. This will be done in the context of global energy needs and challenges, and will include an overview of different energy technologies. This course will introduce students to the principles, performance, and challenges of electrochemical and photoelectrochemical devices. This will be done in the context of global energy needs and challenges, and will include an overview of different energy technologies.

Subjects

electrochemistry | electrochemistry | battery | battery | fuel cell | fuel cell | energy | energy | electrodes | electrodes | solid oxide fuel cell | solid oxide fuel cell | lithium ion battery | lithium ion battery | proton exchange membrane | proton exchange membrane | electrical double layer | electrical double layer | chemical equilibrium | chemical equilibrium | chemical potential | chemical potential | catalysis | catalysis | Butler-Volmer model | Butler-Volmer model | electrochemical impedance spectroscopy | electrochemical impedance spectroscopy | kinetics | kinetics | surface reactivity | surface reactivity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT) 21H.207 The Energy Crisis: Past and Present (MIT)

Description

This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th This course will explore how Americans have confronted energy challenges since the end of World War II. Beginning in the 1970s, Americans worried about the supply of energy. As American production of oil declined, would the US be able to secure enough fuel to sustain their high consumption lifestyles? At the same time, Americans also began to fear the environmental side affects of energy use. Even if the US had enough fossil fuel, would its consumption be detrimental to health and safety? This class examines how Americans thought about these questions in the last half-century. We will consider the political, diplomatic, economic, cultural, and technological aspects of the energy crisis. Topics include nuclear power, suburbanization and the new car culture, the environmental movement and th

Subjects

energy | energy | USA | USA | oil embargo | oil embargo | Gulf War | Gulf War | Richard Nixon | Richard Nixon | Ronald Reagan | Ronald Reagan | Jimmy Carter | Jimmy Carter | George Bush | George Bush | nuclear power | nuclear power | wind power | wind power | fossil fuel | fossil fuel | automobiles | automobiles | suburbia | suburbia | Iran Hostage Crisis | Iran Hostage Crisis | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | oil drilling | oil drilling | Kyoto Protocol | Kyoto Protocol | solar power | solar power | OPEC | OPEC | EPA | EPA | Earth Day | Earth Day | environmentalism | environmentalism | atomic bomb | atomic bomb | Gerald Ford | Gerald Ford | Levittown | Levittown | Manhattan Project | Manhattan Project

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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