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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT) 15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed. Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | computers | future developments | future developments | networks | networks | distributed computing | distributed computing | programming languages | programming languages | firewall | firewall | e-business | e-business | computer architecture | computer architecture | operating | operating | software development | software development | database | database | user interface | user interface | telecommunication | telecommunication | data transmission | data transmission | local area network | local area network | wireless network | wireless network | internet | internet | world wide web | world wide web | digital security | digital security | architecture | architecture | data | data | transmission | transmission | wireless | wireless | interface | interface | user | user | software | software | development | development | programming | programming | languages | languages | distributed | distributed | computing | computing | LAN | LAN | local | local | area | area | future | future | digital | digital | security | security | technology | technology | information | information | management | management | systems | systems | relational | relational | graphical | graphical | interfaces | interfaces | client/server | client/server | enterprise | enterprise | applications | applications | cryptography | cryptography | services | services | Microsoft | Microsoft | Access | Access | Lotus Notes | Lotus Notes | processing | processing | memory | memory | I/O | I/O | CPU | CPU | OS | OS | hardware | hardware | compression | compression | SQL | SQL | queries | queries | design | design | WAN | WAN | wide | wide | Ethernet | Ethernet | packet-switched | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | peer-to-peer | WWW | WWW | public | public | key | key | mining | mining | warehousing | warehousing | concepts | concepts | conceptual | conceptual | modern computing | modern computing | information management | information management | operating systems | operating systems | relational database systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | client/server systems | enterprise applications | enterprise applications | web.internet services | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | Microsoft Access | database management systems | database management systems | information technology | information technology | telecommunications | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | eBusiness applications | client | client | servers | servers | wireless area network | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.431 Entrepreneurial Finance (MIT) 15.431 Entrepreneurial Finance (MIT)

Description

This class examines the elements of entrepreneurial finance, focusing on technology-based start-up ventures, and the early stages of company development. It addresses key questions which challenge all entrepreneurs: how much money can and should be raised; when should it be raised and from whom; what is a reasonable valuation of the company; and how funding should be structured. The subject aims to prepare students for these decisions, both as entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. This class examines the elements of entrepreneurial finance, focusing on technology-based start-up ventures, and the early stages of company development. It addresses key questions which challenge all entrepreneurs: how much money can and should be raised; when should it be raised and from whom; what is a reasonable valuation of the company; and how funding should be structured. The subject aims to prepare students for these decisions, both as entrepreneurs and venture capitalists.

Subjects

entrepreneurship; entrepreneurism; accounting; business evaluation; business valuation; financing; venture capital funds; employment; option pricing; futures; corporate finance; deal structure; initial public offerings; IPO | entrepreneurship; entrepreneurism; accounting; business evaluation; business valuation; financing; venture capital funds; employment; option pricing; futures; corporate finance; deal structure; initial public offerings; IPO | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurism | entrepreneurism | accounting | accounting | business evaluation | business evaluation | business valuation | business valuation | financing | financing | venture capital funds | venture capital funds | employment | employment | option pricing | option pricing | futures | futures | corporate finance | corporate finance | deal structure | deal structure | initial public offerings | initial public offerings | IPO | IPO | entreprenurial finance | entreprenurial finance | start-up | start-up | development | development | fund raising | fund raising | company valuation | company valuation | exit strategy | exit strategy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability

Description

This free course, Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability, introduces ways in which systems thinking can help support processes of decision making among stakeholders with different, often contrasting, perspectives on sustainable development in order to generate purposeful action to improve situations of change and uncertainty. You will be encouraged to engage with the concept of sustainable development, and discover and contextualise your own sustainable development beliefs and values. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 This free course, Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability, introduces ways in which systems thinking can help support processes of decision making among stakeholders with different, often contrasting, perspectives on sustainable development in order to generate purposeful action to improve situations of change and uncertainty. You will be encouraged to engage with the concept of sustainable development, and discover and contextualise your own sustainable development beliefs and values. First published on Tue, 29 Mar 2016 as Systems thinking: Understanding sustainability. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Systems (Computer) | Systems (Computer) | energy | energy | future | future | global warming | global warming | acid rain | acid rain

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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6.851 Advanced Data Structures (MIT) 6.851 Advanced Data Structures (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Data structures play a central role in modern computer science. You interact with data structures even more often than with algorithms (think Google, your mail server, and even your network routers). In addition, data structures are essential building blocks in obtaining efficient algorithms. This course covers major results and current directions of research in data structure. Acknowledgments Thanks to videographers Martin Demaine and Justin Zhang. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. Data structures play a central role in modern computer science. You interact with data structures even more often than with algorithms (think Google, your mail server, and even your network routers). In addition, data structures are essential building blocks in obtaining efficient algorithms. This course covers major results and current directions of research in data structure. Acknowledgments Thanks to videographers Martin Demaine and Justin Zhang.

Subjects

data | data | structures | structures | data structures | data structures | computers | computers | computer science | computer science | strings | strings | dynamic graphs | dynamic graphs | integers | integers | hash | hash | hashing | hashing | hashish | hashish | hashtag | hashtag | hash tag | hash tag | hash tagger | hash tagger | memory | memory | memory heirarchy | memory heirarchy | binary tree | binary tree | binary search | binary search | binary search tree | binary search tree | time travel | time travel | back to the future | back to the future | forward to the past | forward to the past | database | database | table | table | database table | database table | cache | cache | caching | caching | mad cache money | mad cache money | logarithmic time | logarithmic time | eurythmic time | eurythmic time | operations | operations | search | search | heaps | heaps

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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SP.256 The Coming Years (MIT) SP.256 The Coming Years (MIT)

Description

Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies. Explore the future through modeling, reading, and discussion in an open-ended seminar! Our fields of interest will include changes in science and technology, culture and lifestyles, and dominant paradigms and societies.

Subjects

futurology | futurology | historiography | historiography | change | change | fractals | fractals | nuclear war | nuclear war | global warming | global warming | bioterrorism | bioterrorism | singularity | singularity | politics | politics | memetics | memetics | demographics | demographics | power laws | power laws | recent past | recent past | near future | near future | prediction | prediction | history | history | revolution | revolution | memes | memes

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.001J CityScope: New Orleans (MIT) 4.001J CityScope: New Orleans (MIT)

Description

Do you want to think about ways to help solve New Orleans' problems? CityScope is a project-based introduction to the contemporary city. "Problem solving in complex (urban) environments" is different than "solving complex problems." As a member of a team, you will learn to assess scenarios for the purpose of formulating social, economic and design strategies to provide humane and sustainable solutions. A visit to New Orleans is planned for spring break 2007. Do you want to think about ways to help solve New Orleans' problems? CityScope is a project-based introduction to the contemporary city. "Problem solving in complex (urban) environments" is different than "solving complex problems." As a member of a team, you will learn to assess scenarios for the purpose of formulating social, economic and design strategies to provide humane and sustainable solutions. A visit to New Orleans is planned for spring break 2007.

Subjects

new orleans | new orleans | hurricane katrina | hurricane katrina | flooding | flooding | rebuilding | rebuilding | problem-solving | problem-solving | future of the city | future of the city | city footprint | city footprint | natural disaster | natural disaster | housing | housing | urban reconstruction | urban reconstruction | bring new orleans back commission | bring new orleans back commission | disaster recovery | disaster recovery | flood protection | flood protection | parks and open spaces | parks and open spaces | lower ninth ward restoration | lower ninth ward restoration | city design | city design | sustainable city | sustainable city | sustainable new orleans | sustainable new orleans | public housing | public housing | urban ecology | urban ecology | urban infrastructure | urban infrastructure | port of new orleans | port of new orleans | louisiana | louisiana

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sustainable development and crime in the urban Caribbean

Description

David Howard (Lecturer in Sustainable Urban Development, University of Oxford) looks at larger concerns over social and spatial equity, conceptual approaches to sovereignty and the practical interpretation of sustainable forms of justice. Abstract: Recent urban policy initiatives in the Caribbean have shifted from producing material infrastructural change to a greater emphasis on confronting 'civil disorder' via new forms of policing and surveillance. Just as development policy witnessed a 'cultural turn' during the 1990s, so too have sustainable development initiatives at local and international scales recognised and revised attention on forms of social sustainability. Increasing levels of violent crime over the last decade across the Caribbean, one of the most urbanised regions in th Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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New business models for low-carbon cities

Description

Mark Hinnells (Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford) explores the impact of policy measures to deliver a low-carbon economy on the development of new business models for low-carbon cities. Abstract: This research explores the impact of policy measures to deliver a low carbon economy (both near term and more extensive policy change) on the development of new business models for low carbon cities. Buildings account for around 47% of UK Carbon emissions (including both residential and non-residential buildings, and including space conditioning, lights and appliances and equipment). The current policy framework will not be sufficient to deliver a 60% or 80% reduction in carbon emissions, and the policy framework is expected to see substantial change in the next decade and be Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

low-carbon economy | urban policy and planning | sustainability | future | cities | new business models | low-carbon economy | urban policy and planning | sustainability | future | cities | new business models | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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4.110J Design Across Scales, Disciplines and Problem Contexts (MIT) 4.110J Design Across Scales, Disciplines and Problem Contexts (MIT)

Description

This course explores the reciprocal relationships among design, science, and technology by covering a wide range of topics including industrial design, architecture, visualization and perception, design computation, material ecology, and environmental design and sustainability. Students will examine how transformations in science and technology have influenced design thinking and vice versa, as well as develop methodologies for design research and collaborate on design solutions to interdisciplinary problems. This course explores the reciprocal relationships among design, science, and technology by covering a wide range of topics including industrial design, architecture, visualization and perception, design computation, material ecology, and environmental design and sustainability. Students will examine how transformations in science and technology have influenced design thinking and vice versa, as well as develop methodologies for design research and collaborate on design solutions to interdisciplinary problems.

Subjects

4.110 | 4.110 | MAS.330 | MAS.330 | design | design | media | media | animation | animation | image | image | data | data | visualization | visualization | representation | representation | database | database | Processing | Processing | fabrication | fabrication | technology | technology | systems | systems | model | model | AI | AI | intelligence | intelligence | programming | programming | optimization | optimization | machine | machine | play | play | game | game | utopia | utopia | future | future | dystopia | dystopia | science fiction | science fiction | environment | environment | growth | growth | organization | organization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.950 Understanding Modern Military Operations (MIT) 17.950 Understanding Modern Military Operations (MIT)

Description

A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, including especially weapon, sensor, communication, and information processing technologies, and the human or organizational side of war, including especially military doctrine, which is an institutionalized vision within military organizations that predicts how the material tools of war will be wielded on future battlefields. Military doctrine makes assumptions about the nature of future battlefields, and determines what the division of labor on those battlefields will be between different military tools. Doctrine also therefore determines the organizational hierarchy among the various branches of the military which wield those tools. Thus, one way to think of the relation A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, including especially weapon, sensor, communication, and information processing technologies, and the human or organizational side of war, including especially military doctrine, which is an institutionalized vision within military organizations that predicts how the material tools of war will be wielded on future battlefields. Military doctrine makes assumptions about the nature of future battlefields, and determines what the division of labor on those battlefields will be between different military tools. Doctrine also therefore determines the organizational hierarchy among the various branches of the military which wield those tools. Thus, one way to think of the relation

Subjects

Political science | Political science | military | military | modern | modern | operations | operations | material | material | war | war | weapon | weapon | sensor | sensor | communication | communication | information processing | information processing | technologies | technologies | human | human | organizational | organizational | doctrine | doctrine | future | future | battlefields | battlefields | organizational hierarchy | organizational hierarchy | branches. | branches. | branches | branches

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sustainable development and crime in the urban Caribbean

Description

David Howard (Lecturer in Sustainable Urban Development, University of Oxford) looks at larger concerns over social and spatial equity, conceptual approaches to sovereignty and the practical interpretation of sustainable forms of justice. Abstract: Recent urban policy initiatives in the Caribbean have shifted from producing material infrastructural change to a greater emphasis on confronting 'civil disorder' via new forms of policing and surveillance. Just as development policy witnessed a 'cultural turn' during the 1990s, so too have sustainable development initiatives at local and international scales recognised and revised attention on forms of social sustainability. Increasing levels of violent crime over the last decade across the Caribbean, one of the most urbanised regions in th Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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14.461 Advanced Macroeconomics I (MIT) 14.461 Advanced Macroeconomics I (MIT)

Description

This course covers three sets of topics. The first part will cover business cycle models with imperfect information. We will ask questions such as: What shocks drive business cycles? What is the relative role of shocks to fundamentals and shocks affecting expectations about (current and future) economic developments? How do informational frictions affect the shape of the responses to various shocks? The second part will cover models of investment with credit constraints. We will ask questions such as: What is the transmission mechanism from shocks to the financial sector to the real economy? What determines optimal decisions about capitalization at the individual and at the social level? The third part will cover search models of decentralized trade applied both to labor markets and to This course covers three sets of topics. The first part will cover business cycle models with imperfect information. We will ask questions such as: What shocks drive business cycles? What is the relative role of shocks to fundamentals and shocks affecting expectations about (current and future) economic developments? How do informational frictions affect the shape of the responses to various shocks? The second part will cover models of investment with credit constraints. We will ask questions such as: What is the transmission mechanism from shocks to the financial sector to the real economy? What determines optimal decisions about capitalization at the individual and at the social level? The third part will cover search models of decentralized trade applied both to labor markets and to

Subjects

news about the future and fluctuations | news about the future and fluctuations | dispersed information | dispersed information | estimating models with imperfect information | estimating models with imperfect information | models with limited pledgeability | models with limited pledgeability | models with corporate control problems | models with corporate control problems | models with intermediation and securitization | models with intermediation and securitization | financial frictions | financial frictions | investment | investment | labor market search and inefficiency | labor market search and inefficiency | wage dispersion | wage dispersion | moral hazard | moral hazard | optimal unemployment insurance | optimal unemployment insurance | money search | money search | liquidity | liquidity | adverse selection and lemons problem | adverse selection and lemons problem | decentralized trading in financial markets | decentralized trading in financial markets

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.44 Energy Economics (MIT) 14.44 Energy Economics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission. This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission.

Subjects

supply and demand | supply and demand | competitive market | competitive market | energy demand | energy demand | income elasticity | income elasticity | multivariate regression analysis | multivariate regression analysis | natural gas | natural gas | price regulation | price regulation | deregulation | deregulation | electricity | electricity | oil | oil | energy security | energy security | risk management | risk management | futures markets | futures markets | climate change | climate change | energy | energy | coal | coal | nuclear power | nuclear power | energy efficiency | energy efficiency | policy | policy | renewable energy | renewable energy | emissions | emissions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT) 8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m 8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC) | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.301 French I (MIT) 21G.301 French I (MIT)

Description

21G.301/351 offers an introduction to the French language and culture with an emphasis on the acquisition of vocabulary and grammatical concepts through active communication. The course is conducted entirely in French, and students interact in French with their classmates from the very beginning. They also receive exposure to the language via a variety of authentic sources such as the Internet, audio, video and printed materials which help them develop cultural awareness as well as linguistic proficiency. There is a coordinated language lab program.This course is taught in rotation by the following instructors: Laura Ceia-Minjares, Cathy Culot, Gilberte Furstenberg, and Johann Sadock. 21G.301/351 offers an introduction to the French language and culture with an emphasis on the acquisition of vocabulary and grammatical concepts through active communication. The course is conducted entirely in French, and students interact in French with their classmates from the very beginning. They also receive exposure to the language via a variety of authentic sources such as the Internet, audio, video and printed materials which help them develop cultural awareness as well as linguistic proficiency. There is a coordinated language lab program.This course is taught in rotation by the following instructors: Laura Ceia-Minjares, Cathy Culot, Gilberte Furstenberg, and Johann Sadock.

Subjects

French | French | introduction | introduction | understand | understand | speak | speak | write | write | present | present | future | future | past | past | tense | tense | family | family | food | food | travel | travel | hobbies | hobbies | activities | activities | environment | environment | context | context | compositions | compositions | Francophone | Francophone | customs | customs | history | history | civilization | civilization | 21F.301 | 21F.301 | 21F.351 | 21F.351

License

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21W.759 Writing Science Fiction (MIT) 21W.759 Writing Science Fiction (MIT)

Description

This class will focus on the craft of writing genre science fiction. Students write and read science fiction and analyze and discuss stories written for the class. For the first eight weeks, readings in contemporary science fiction accompany lectures and formal writing assignments intended to illuminate various aspects of writing craft as well as the particular problems of writing science fiction. The rest of the term is given to roundtable workshops on student's stories. This class will focus on the craft of writing genre science fiction. Students write and read science fiction and analyze and discuss stories written for the class. For the first eight weeks, readings in contemporary science fiction accompany lectures and formal writing assignments intended to illuminate various aspects of writing craft as well as the particular problems of writing science fiction. The rest of the term is given to roundtable workshops on student's stories.

Subjects

writing | writing | scifi | scifi | sci fi | sci fi | science fiction | science fiction | fantasy | fantasy | fiction | fiction | literature | literature | genre | genre | workshop | workshop | speculative fiction | speculative fiction | subgenre | subgenre | world building | world building | worldbuilding | worldbuilding | protagonist | protagonist | characters | characters | future | future | theme | theme | futurist | futurist | publishing | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.431 Entrepreneurial Finance (MIT)

Description

This class examines the elements of entrepreneurial finance, focusing on technology-based start-up ventures, and the early stages of company development. It addresses key questions which challenge all entrepreneurs: how much money can and should be raised; when should it be raised and from whom; what is a reasonable valuation of the company; and how funding should be structured. The subject aims to prepare students for these decisions, both as entrepreneurs and venture capitalists.

Subjects

entrepreneurship; entrepreneurism; accounting; business evaluation; business valuation; financing; venture capital funds; employment; option pricing; futures; corporate finance; deal structure; initial public offerings; IPO | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurism | accounting | business evaluation | business valuation | financing | venture capital funds | employment | option pricing | futures | corporate finance | deal structure | initial public offerings | IPO | entreprenurial finance | start-up | development | fund raising | company valuation | exit strategy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Future Flight Central Future Flight Central

Description

Subjects

nasa | nasa | moffettfield | moffettfield | faa | faa | amesresearchcenter | amesresearchcenter | futureflightcentralairtrafficcontrol | futureflightcentralairtrafficcontrol

License

No known copyright restrictions

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11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT) 11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian | utopian and realized form | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | future prospects of cities | territory | territory | cities | cities | context | context | local | local | national | national | global | global | urban settings | urban settings | city design | city design | social justice | social justice | politics of change | politics of change | urban design | urban design | history | history | theory | theory | territorial settings | territorial settings | urbanites | urbanites | city dwellers | city dwellers | inhabitants | inhabitants | nestedness | nestedness | regional | regional | imperial | imperial | politics | politics | sociology | sociology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Future energy demand and supply Future energy demand and supply

Description

When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th Century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. Future energy demand and supply is a free course that offers an introduction to how this is being undertaken. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Future energy demand and supply. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 When you consider that the global annual consumption of primary energy increased more than ten-fold during the 20th Century, the importance of planning future energy supply becomes clear. Future energy demand and supply is a free course that offers an introduction to how this is being undertaken. First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Future energy demand and supply. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Future energy demand and supply. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 First published on Tue, 22 Mar 2016 as Future energy demand and supply. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Environmental Science | Environmental Science | energy | energy | future | future | global warming | global warming | acid rain | acid rain

License

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

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15.997 Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT) 15.997 Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT)

Description

This is a course on how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm — any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Among the topics we will discuss are how companies manage risk, instruments for hedging, liability management and organization, governance and control. This is a course on how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm — any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Among the topics we will discuss are how companies manage risk, instruments for hedging, liability management and organization, governance and control.

Subjects

advanced corporate risk management | advanced corporate risk management | derivatives | futures and options | derivatives | futures and options | financial engineering | financial engineering | corporations | corporations | risk management | risk management | pricing models | pricing models | operations | operations | real assets | real assets | core strategy | core strategy | trading operations | trading operations | contracts | contracts | hedging | hedging | corporate governance | corporate governance | shareholders | shareholders | valuation | valuation | liability management | liability management

License

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11.333 Urban Design Seminar (MIT) 11.333 Urban Design Seminar (MIT)

Description

This course is a requirement for completion of the Urban Design Certificate Program. It investigates the complex nature of 'successful' urban design and attempts to identify and evaluate examples of urban design that are at the leading edge of practice, anticipating the future. The seminar will deal with two parallel questions: what are the key trends that will shape the future form and function of cities, and how will these changes affect the role of the urban designer? The first part of the seminar focuses on the present, and the second part of the semester will consider the future. After the course surveys the landscape of contemporary urban design practice, the challenge it will pose to students will be to identify the trajectory of cities and city design from both physical and socia This course is a requirement for completion of the Urban Design Certificate Program. It investigates the complex nature of 'successful' urban design and attempts to identify and evaluate examples of urban design that are at the leading edge of practice, anticipating the future. The seminar will deal with two parallel questions: what are the key trends that will shape the future form and function of cities, and how will these changes affect the role of the urban designer? The first part of the seminar focuses on the present, and the second part of the semester will consider the future. After the course surveys the landscape of contemporary urban design practice, the challenge it will pose to students will be to identify the trajectory of cities and city design from both physical and socia

Subjects

urban design | urban design | design competitions | design competitions | past and future design trends | past and future design trends | elderly housing | elderly housing | neighborhood design | neighborhood design | housing and technology | housing and technology | workplace design | workplace design | mediated space | mediated space | public spaces and technology | public spaces and technology | schools and technology | schools and technology | cultural regeneration | cultural regeneration | arts districts | arts districts | museums | museums | interpretive pathways | interpretive pathways | waterfront design | waterfront design | natural systems | natural systems | environmental sustainability | environmental sustainability | urban design education | urban design education

License

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