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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT) 15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed. Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | computers | future developments | future developments | networks | networks | distributed computing | distributed computing | programming languages | programming languages | firewall | firewall | e-business | e-business | computer architecture | computer architecture | operating | operating | software development | software development | database | database | user interface | user interface | telecommunication | telecommunication | data transmission | data transmission | local area network | local area network | wireless network | wireless network | internet | internet | world wide web | world wide web | digital security | digital security | architecture | architecture | data | data | transmission | transmission | wireless | wireless | interface | interface | user | user | software | software | development | development | programming | programming | languages | languages | distributed | distributed | computing | computing | LAN | LAN | local | local | area | area | future | future | digital | digital | security | security | technology | technology | information | information | management | management | systems | systems | relational | relational | graphical | graphical | interfaces | interfaces | client/server | client/server | enterprise | enterprise | applications | applications | cryptography | cryptography | services | services | Microsoft | Microsoft | Access | Access | Lotus Notes | Lotus Notes | processing | processing | memory | memory | I/O | I/O | CPU | CPU | OS | OS | hardware | hardware | compression | compression | SQL | SQL | queries | queries | design | design | WAN | WAN | wide | wide | Ethernet | Ethernet | packet-switched | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | peer-to-peer | WWW | WWW | public | public | key | key | mining | mining | warehousing | warehousing | concepts | concepts | conceptual | conceptual | modern computing | modern computing | information management | information management | operating systems | operating systems | relational database systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | client/server systems | enterprise applications | enterprise applications | web.internet services | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | Microsoft Access | database management systems | database management systems | information technology | information technology | telecommunications | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | eBusiness applications | client | client | servers | servers | wireless area network | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.431 Entrepreneurial Finance (MIT) 15.431 Entrepreneurial Finance (MIT)

Description

This class examines the elements of entrepreneurial finance, focusing on technology-based start-up ventures, and the early stages of company development. It addresses key questions which challenge all entrepreneurs: how much money can and should be raised; when should it be raised and from whom; what is a reasonable valuation of the company; and how funding should be structured. The subject aims to prepare students for these decisions, both as entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. This class examines the elements of entrepreneurial finance, focusing on technology-based start-up ventures, and the early stages of company development. It addresses key questions which challenge all entrepreneurs: how much money can and should be raised; when should it be raised and from whom; what is a reasonable valuation of the company; and how funding should be structured. The subject aims to prepare students for these decisions, both as entrepreneurs and venture capitalists.

Subjects

entrepreneurship; entrepreneurism; accounting; business evaluation; business valuation; financing; venture capital funds; employment; option pricing; futures; corporate finance; deal structure; initial public offerings; IPO | entrepreneurship; entrepreneurism; accounting; business evaluation; business valuation; financing; venture capital funds; employment; option pricing; futures; corporate finance; deal structure; initial public offerings; IPO | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurism | entrepreneurism | accounting | accounting | business evaluation | business evaluation | business valuation | business valuation | financing | financing | venture capital funds | venture capital funds | employment | employment | option pricing | option pricing | futures | futures | corporate finance | corporate finance | deal structure | deal structure | initial public offerings | initial public offerings | IPO | IPO | entreprenurial finance | entreprenurial finance | start-up | start-up | development | development | fund raising | fund raising | company valuation | company valuation | exit strategy | exit strategy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.564 Information Technology I (MIT)

Description

Information Technology I helps students understand technical concepts underlying current and future developments in information technology. There will be a special emphasis on networks and distributed computing. Students will also gain some hands-on exposure to powerful, high-level tools for making computers do amazing things, without the need for conventional programming languages. Since 15.564 is an introductory course, no knowledge of how computers work or are programmed is assumed.

Subjects

developing-country governments; international | computers; future developments; networks;distributed computing; programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers;future developments;networks;distributed computing;programming languages;firewall;e-business;computerarchitecture;operating systems;software development;database;user interface;telecommunication;data transmission;localarea network;wireless network;internet;world wide web;digital security | computers | future developments | networks | distributed computing | programming languages | firewall | e-business | computer architecture | operating | software development | database | user interface | telecommunication | data transmission | local area network | wireless network | internet | world wide web | digital security | architecture | data | transmission | wireless | interface | user | software | development | programming | languages | distributed | computing | LAN | local | area | future | digital | security | technology | information | management | systems | relational | graphical | interfaces | client/server | enterprise | applications | cryptography | services | Microsoft | Access | Lotus Notes | processing | memory | I/O | CPU | OS | hardware | compression | SQL | queries | design | WAN | wide | Ethernet | packet-switched | peer-to-peer | WWW | public | key | mining | warehousing | concepts | conceptual | modern computing | information management | operating systems | relational database systems | graphical user interfaces | client/server systems | enterprise applications | web.internet services | Microsoft Access | database management systems | information technology | telecommunications | eBusiness applications | client | servers | wireless area network

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Sustainable development and crime in the urban Caribbean

Description

David Howard (Lecturer in Sustainable Urban Development, University of Oxford) looks at larger concerns over social and spatial equity, conceptual approaches to sovereignty and the practical interpretation of sustainable forms of justice. Abstract: Recent urban policy initiatives in the Caribbean have shifted from producing material infrastructural change to a greater emphasis on confronting 'civil disorder' via new forms of policing and surveillance. Just as development policy witnessed a 'cultural turn' during the 1990s, so too have sustainable development initiatives at local and international scales recognised and revised attention on forms of social sustainability. Increasing levels of violent crime over the last decade across the Caribbean, one of the most urbanised regions in th Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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New business models for low-carbon cities

Description

Mark Hinnells (Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford) explores the impact of policy measures to deliver a low-carbon economy on the development of new business models for low-carbon cities. Abstract: This research explores the impact of policy measures to deliver a low carbon economy (both near term and more extensive policy change) on the development of new business models for low carbon cities. Buildings account for around 47% of UK Carbon emissions (including both residential and non-residential buildings, and including space conditioning, lights and appliances and equipment). The current policy framework will not be sufficient to deliver a 60% or 80% reduction in carbon emissions, and the policy framework is expected to see substantial change in the next decade and be Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

low-carbon economy | urban policy and planning | sustainability | future | cities | new business models | low-carbon economy | urban policy and planning | sustainability | future | cities | new business models | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Sustainable development and crime in the urban Caribbean

Description

David Howard (Lecturer in Sustainable Urban Development, University of Oxford) looks at larger concerns over social and spatial equity, conceptual approaches to sovereignty and the practical interpretation of sustainable forms of justice. Abstract: Recent urban policy initiatives in the Caribbean have shifted from producing material infrastructural change to a greater emphasis on confronting 'civil disorder' via new forms of policing and surveillance. Just as development policy witnessed a 'cultural turn' during the 1990s, so too have sustainable development initiatives at local and international scales recognised and revised attention on forms of social sustainability. Increasing levels of violent crime over the last decade across the Caribbean, one of the most urbanised regions in th Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | Caribbean | citizenship | urban policy and planning | Central America | crime | sustainability | future | Dominican Republic | cities | security | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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17.950 Understanding Modern Military Operations (MIT) 17.950 Understanding Modern Military Operations (MIT)

Description

A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, including especially weapon, sensor, communication, and information processing technologies, and the human or organizational side of war, including especially military doctrine, which is an institutionalized vision within military organizations that predicts how the material tools of war will be wielded on future battlefields. Military doctrine makes assumptions about the nature of future battlefields, and determines what the division of labor on those battlefields will be between different military tools. Doctrine also therefore determines the organizational hierarchy among the various branches of the military which wield those tools. Thus, one way to think of the relation A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, including especially weapon, sensor, communication, and information processing technologies, and the human or organizational side of war, including especially military doctrine, which is an institutionalized vision within military organizations that predicts how the material tools of war will be wielded on future battlefields. Military doctrine makes assumptions about the nature of future battlefields, and determines what the division of labor on those battlefields will be between different military tools. Doctrine also therefore determines the organizational hierarchy among the various branches of the military which wield those tools. Thus, one way to think of the relation

Subjects

Political science | Political science | military | military | modern | modern | operations | operations | material | material | war | war | weapon | weapon | sensor | sensor | communication | communication | information processing | information processing | technologies | technologies | human | human | organizational | organizational | doctrine | doctrine | future | future | battlefields | battlefields | organizational hierarchy | organizational hierarchy | branches. | branches. | branches | branches

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.997 Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT) 15.997 Advanced Corporate Risk Management (MIT)

Description

This is a course on how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm — any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Among the topics we will discuss are how companies manage risk, instruments for hedging, liability management and organization, governance and control. This is a course on how corporations make use of the insights and tools of risk management. Most courses on derivatives, futures and options, and financial engineering are taught from the viewpoint of investment bankers and traders in the securities. This course is taught from the point of view of the manufacturing corporation, the utility, the software firm — any potential end-user of derivatives, but not the dealer. Among the topics we will discuss are how companies manage risk, instruments for hedging, liability management and organization, governance and control.

Subjects

advanced corporate risk management | advanced corporate risk management | derivatives | futures and options | derivatives | futures and options | financial engineering | financial engineering | corporations | corporations | risk management | risk management | pricing models | pricing models | operations | operations | real assets | real assets | core strategy | core strategy | trading operations | trading operations | contracts | contracts | hedging | hedging | corporate governance | corporate governance | shareholders | shareholders | valuation | valuation | liability management | liability management

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.730-1 Imagining the Future (MIT) 21W.730-1 Imagining the Future (MIT)

Description

Turn-of-the-century eras have historically been times when people are more than usually inclined to scrutinize the present and speculate about the future. Now, the turn not just of a century but of a millennium having recently passed, such scrutiny and speculations inevitably intensify. What will the future that awaits us in this twenty-first century and beyond be like? And how do visions of that future reflect and respond to the world we live in now? In this writing course we will read and write about how some twentieth-century writers and filmmakers have attended to the present as a way of imagining -- and warning about -- possible worlds to come. Guided by our reading and discussion, we will scrutinize our own present and construct our own visions of the future through close readings of Turn-of-the-century eras have historically been times when people are more than usually inclined to scrutinize the present and speculate about the future. Now, the turn not just of a century but of a millennium having recently passed, such scrutiny and speculations inevitably intensify. What will the future that awaits us in this twenty-first century and beyond be like? And how do visions of that future reflect and respond to the world we live in now? In this writing course we will read and write about how some twentieth-century writers and filmmakers have attended to the present as a way of imagining -- and warning about -- possible worlds to come. Guided by our reading and discussion, we will scrutinize our own present and construct our own visions of the future through close readings of

Subjects

Turn-of-the-century | Turn-of-the-century | eras | eras | present | present | future | future | millennium | millennium | twenty-first century | twenty-first century | visions | visions | imagination | imagination | world | world | writing | writing | read | read | twentieth-century | twentieth-century | writers | writers | filmmakers | filmmakers | imagining | imagining | warning | warning | discussion | discussion | contemporary | contemporary | culture | culture | urban | urban | environmental | environmental | crises | crises | economic | economic | imperialism | imperialism | sexual | sexual | reproductive | reproductive | politics | politics | race | race | gender | gender | romance | romance | technology | technology | robotics | robotics | cyborg | cyborg | media saturation | media saturation | language | language | representation | representation | human | human

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT) 8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments.  Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, 8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments.  Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories,

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC) | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.950 Understanding Military Operations (MIT) 17.950 Understanding Military Operations (MIT)

Description

A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, and the human or organizational side of war. This seminar will break apart selected past, current, and future sea, air, space, and land battlefields into their constituent parts and look at the interaction in each of those warfare areas between existing military doctrine and weapons, sensors, communications, and information processing technologies. It will specifically seek to explore how technological development, whether innovative or stagnant, is influenced in each warfare area by military doctrine. A proper understanding of modern military operations requires a prior understanding of both the material side of war, and the human or organizational side of war. This seminar will break apart selected past, current, and future sea, air, space, and land battlefields into their constituent parts and look at the interaction in each of those warfare areas between existing military doctrine and weapons, sensors, communications, and information processing technologies. It will specifically seek to explore how technological development, whether innovative or stagnant, is influenced in each warfare area by military doctrine.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | military | military | modern | modern | operations | operations | material | material | war | war | weapon | weapon | sensor | sensor | communication | communication | information processing | information processing | technologies | technologies | human | human | organizational | organizational | doctrine | doctrine | future | future | battlefields | battlefields | organizational hierarchy | organizational hierarchy | branches | branches

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.918 New Global Agenda: Exploring 21st Century Challenges through Innovations in Information Technologies (MIT) 17.918 New Global Agenda: Exploring 21st Century Challenges through Innovations in Information Technologies (MIT)

Description

This workshop is designed to introduce students to different perspectives on international politics in the 21st century. Students will explore how advances in information technology are changing international relations and global governance through opening new channels of communication, creating new methods of education, and new potentials for democratization. We will consider the positive and negative externalities associated with applications of such technologies. Students will be encouraged to look at alternative futures, and/or to frame solutions to problems that they define. The class will include guest lectures, discussions, and a final project and presentation. This workshop is designed to introduce students to different perspectives on international politics in the 21st century. Students will explore how advances in information technology are changing international relations and global governance through opening new channels of communication, creating new methods of education, and new potentials for democratization. We will consider the positive and negative externalities associated with applications of such technologies. Students will be encouraged to look at alternative futures, and/or to frame solutions to problems that they define. The class will include guest lectures, discussions, and a final project and presentation.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | global | global | Twenty-first Century | Twenty-first Century | innovation | innovation | challenges | challenges | information technology | information technology | workshop | workshop | international politics | international politics | international relations | international relations | global governance | global governance | communication | communication | education | education | democratization | democratization | alternative futures | alternative futures | solutions | solutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.951 Intelligence: Practice, Problems and Prospects (MIT) 17.951 Intelligence: Practice, Problems and Prospects (MIT)

Description

This course will explore the organization and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community, its interaction with national security policymakers, key issues about its workings, and the challenges it faces in defining its future role. The events of 9/11 and the invasion of Iraq have focused new attention on national intelligence, including the most significant reorganization of the community since the National Security Act of 1947. The course will highlight some of the major debates about the role, practices, and problems of national intelligence. This course will explore the organization and functions of the U.S. Intelligence Community, its interaction with national security policymakers, key issues about its workings, and the challenges it faces in defining its future role. The events of 9/11 and the invasion of Iraq have focused new attention on national intelligence, including the most significant reorganization of the community since the National Security Act of 1947. The course will highlight some of the major debates about the role, practices, and problems of national intelligence.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | security studies | security studies | U.S. Intelligence Community | U.S. Intelligence Community | national security | national security | policymakers | policymakers | future role | future role | 9/11 | 9/11 | Iraq | Iraq | national intelligence | national intelligence | National Security Act of 1947 | National Security Act of 1947

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.001J CityScope: New Orleans (MIT) 4.001J CityScope: New Orleans (MIT)

Description

Do you want to think about ways to help solve New Orleans' problems? CityScope is a project-based introduction to the contemporary city. "Problem solving in complex (urban) environments" is different than "solving complex problems." As a member of a team, you will learn to assess scenarios for the purpose of formulating social, economic and design strategies to provide humane and sustainable solutions. A visit to New Orleans is planned for spring break 2007. Do you want to think about ways to help solve New Orleans' problems? CityScope is a project-based introduction to the contemporary city. "Problem solving in complex (urban) environments" is different than "solving complex problems." As a member of a team, you will learn to assess scenarios for the purpose of formulating social, economic and design strategies to provide humane and sustainable solutions. A visit to New Orleans is planned for spring break 2007.

Subjects

new orleans | new orleans | hurricane katrina | hurricane katrina | flooding | flooding | rebuilding | rebuilding | problem-solving | problem-solving | future of the city | future of the city | city footprint | city footprint | natural disaster | natural disaster | housing | housing | urban reconstruction | urban reconstruction | bring new orleans back commission | bring new orleans back commission | disaster recovery | disaster recovery | flood protection | flood protection | parks and open spaces | parks and open spaces | lower ninth ward restoration | lower ninth ward restoration | city design | city design | sustainable city | sustainable city | sustainable new orleans | sustainable new orleans | public housing | public housing | urban ecology | urban ecology | urban infrastructure | urban infrastructure | port of new orleans | port of new orleans | louisiana | louisiana

License

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15.401 Finance Theory I (MIT) 15.401 Finance Theory I (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course introduces the core theory of modern financial economics and financial management, with a focus on capital markets and investments. Topics include functions of capital markets and financial intermediaries, asset valuation, fixed-income securities, common stocks, capital budgeting, diversification and portfolio selection, equilibrium pricing of risky assets, the theory of efficient markets, and an introduction to derivatives and options. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course introduces the core theory of modern financial economics and financial management, with a focus on capital markets and investments. Topics include functions of capital markets and financial intermediaries, asset valuation, fixed-income securities, common stocks, capital budgeting, diversification and portfolio selection, equilibrium pricing of risky assets, the theory of efficient markets, and an introduction to derivatives and options.

Subjects

present value relations | present value relations | fixed income securities | fixed income securities | equities | equities | forward and futures contracts | forward and futures contracts | options | options | risk and return | risk and return | risk analytics | risk analytics | portfolio theory | portfolio theory | CAPM | CAPM | APT | APT | capital budgeting | capital budgeting | efficient markets | efficient markets

License

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11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT) 11.949 City Visions: Past and Future (MIT)

Description

This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as This class is intended to introduce students to understandings of the city generated from both social science literature and the field of urban design. The first part of the course examines literature on the history and theory of the city. Among other factors, it pays special attention to the larger territorial settings in which cities emerged and developed (ranging from the global to the national to the regional context) and how these affected the nature, character, and functioning of cities and the lives of their inhabitants. The remaining weeks focus more explicitly on the theory and practice of design visions for the city, the latter in both utopian and realized form. One of our aims will be to assess the conditions under which a variety of design visions were conceived, and to as

Subjects

understandings of the city | understandings of the city | social science literature and the field of urban design | social science literature and the field of urban design | literature on the history and theory of the city | literature on the history and theory of the city | larger territorial settings | larger territorial settings | nature | character | and functioning of cities | nature | character | and functioning of cities | lives of inhabitants | lives of inhabitants | theory and practice of design visions for the city | theory and practice of design visions for the city | utopian | utopian | utopian and realized form | utopian and realized form | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | patterns of territorial ?nestedness? | future prospects of cities | future prospects of cities | territory | territory | cities | cities | context | context | local | local | national | national | global | global | urban settings | urban settings | city design | city design | social justice | social justice | politics of change | politics of change | urban design | urban design | history | history | theory | theory | territorial settings | territorial settings | urbanites | urbanites | city dwellers | city dwellers | inhabitants | inhabitants | nestedness | nestedness | regional | regional | imperial | imperial | politics | politics | sociology | sociology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT) 8.811 Particle Physics II (MIT)

Description

8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m 8.811, Particle Physics II, describes essential research in High Energy Physics. We derive the Standard Model (SM) first using a bottom up method based on Unitarity, in addition to the usual top down method using SU3xSU2xU1. We describe and analyze several classical experiments, which established the SM, as examples on how to design experiments. Further topics include heavy flavor physics, high-precision tests of the Standard Model, neutrino oscillations, searches for new phenomena (compositeness, supersymmetry, technical color, and GUTs), and discussion of expectations from future accelerators (B factory, LHC, large electron-positron linear colliders, etc). The term paper requires the students to have constant discussions with the instructor throughout the semester on theories, physics, m

Subjects

electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electron-positron and proton-antiproton collisions | electroweak phenomena | electroweak phenomena | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | heavy flavor physics | and high-precision tests of the Standard Model | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | compositeness | supersymmetry | and GUTs | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC) | Top Quark | and expectations from future accelerators (B factory | LHC)

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.333 Urban Design Seminar (MIT) 11.333 Urban Design Seminar (MIT)

Description

This course is a requirement for completion of the Urban Design Certificate Program. It investigates the complex nature of 'successful' urban design and attempts to identify and evaluate examples of urban design that are at the leading edge of practice, anticipating the future. The seminar will deal with two parallel questions: what are the key trends that will shape the future form and function of cities, and how will these changes affect the role of the urban designer? The first part of the seminar focuses on the present, and the second part of the semester will consider the future. After the course surveys the landscape of contemporary urban design practice, the challenge it will pose to students will be to identify the trajectory of cities and city design from both physical and socia This course is a requirement for completion of the Urban Design Certificate Program. It investigates the complex nature of 'successful' urban design and attempts to identify and evaluate examples of urban design that are at the leading edge of practice, anticipating the future. The seminar will deal with two parallel questions: what are the key trends that will shape the future form and function of cities, and how will these changes affect the role of the urban designer? The first part of the seminar focuses on the present, and the second part of the semester will consider the future. After the course surveys the landscape of contemporary urban design practice, the challenge it will pose to students will be to identify the trajectory of cities and city design from both physical and socia

Subjects

urban design | urban design | design competitions | design competitions | past and future design trends | past and future design trends | elderly housing | elderly housing | neighborhood design | neighborhood design | housing and technology | housing and technology | workplace design | workplace design | mediated space | mediated space | public spaces and technology | public spaces and technology | schools and technology | schools and technology | cultural regeneration | cultural regeneration | arts districts | arts districts | museums | museums | interpretive pathways | interpretive pathways | waterfront design | waterfront design | natural systems | natural systems | environmental sustainability | environmental sustainability | urban design education | urban design education

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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14.44 Energy Economics (MIT) 14.44 Energy Economics (MIT)

Description

This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission. This course explores the theoretical and empirical perspectives on individual and industrial demand for energy, energy supply, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses aspects of the oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors and examines energy tax, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency and policies for controlling emission.

Subjects

supply and demand | supply and demand | competitive market | competitive market | energy demand | energy demand | income elasticity | income elasticity | multivariate regression analysis | multivariate regression analysis | natural gas | natural gas | price regulation | price regulation | deregulation | deregulation | electricity | electricity | oil | oil | energy security | energy security | risk management | risk management | futures markets | futures markets | climate change | climate change | energy | energy | coal | coal | nuclear power | nuclear power | energy efficiency | energy efficiency | policy | policy | renewable energy | renewable energy | emissions | emissions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.414 Financial Management (MIT) 15.414 Financial Management (MIT)

Description

Financial Management studies corporate finance and capital markets, emphasizing the financial aspects of managerial decisions. It touches on all areas of finance, including the valuation of real and financial assets, risk management and financial derivatives, the trade-off between risk and expected return, and corporate financing and dividend policy. The course draws heavily on empirical research to help guide managerial decisions. Financial Management studies corporate finance and capital markets, emphasizing the financial aspects of managerial decisions. It touches on all areas of finance, including the valuation of real and financial assets, risk management and financial derivatives, the trade-off between risk and expected return, and corporate financing and dividend policy. The course draws heavily on empirical research to help guide managerial decisions.

Subjects

finance | finance | corporate finance | corporate finance | capital markets | capital markets | managerial decisions | managerial decisions | financial assets | financial assets | risk management | risk management | financial derivatives | financial derivatives | expected return | expected return | risk | risk | dividend policy | dividend policy | empirical research | empirical research | futures | futures | options markets | options markets | valuation | valuation | budgeting | budgeting | portfolio theory | portfolio theory | investments | investments | projects | projects | company | company | companies | companies | return | return | stocks | stocks | bonds | bonds | pricing | pricing | options | options | markets | markets | management | management | capital | capital | assets | assets | derivatives | derivatives | financial | financial | firms | firms

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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15.402 Finance Theory II (MIT) 15.402 Finance Theory II (MIT)

Description

The objective of this course is to learn the financial tools needed to make good business decisions. The course presents the basic insights of corporate finance theory, but emphasizes the application of theory to real business decisions. Each session involves class discussion, some centered on lectures and others around business cases. The objective of this course is to learn the financial tools needed to make good business decisions. The course presents the basic insights of corporate finance theory, but emphasizes the application of theory to real business decisions. Each session involves class discussion, some centered on lectures and others around business cases.

Subjects

business decisions | business decisions | capital structure | capital structure | financial | financial | corporate finance | corporate finance | corporate strategy | corporate strategy | debt | debt | equity | equity | company valuation | company valuation | cash flow | cash flow | investment projects | investment projects | risk management | risk management | corporate governance | corporate governance | financial management | financial management | financial statements | financial statements | financial analysis | financial analysis | finance | finance | theory | theory | corporate | corporate | management | management | capital | capital | investment | investment | decisions | decisions | security | security | dividend | dividend | policy | policy | optimal | optimal | structure | structure | hedging | hedging | risk | risk | futures | futures | markets | markets | options | options | real options | real options | analysis | analysis | cases | cases | business | business | project | project | company | company | valuation | valuation | financing | financing | investments | investments | governance | governance | statements | statements

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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ESD.85J Integrating Doctoral Seminar on Emerging Technologies (MIT) ESD.85J Integrating Doctoral Seminar on Emerging Technologies (MIT)

Description

This team-taught subject is for doctoral students working on emerging technologies at the interface of technology, policy and societal issues. It integrates concepts of research strategy and design from a variety of disciplines. The class addresses problem identification and formulation of research topics, the role of qualitative and quantitative research methods, and the use of various data collection techniques. Coursework focuses on students' thesis proposals, faculty-student study panels, critical evaluation of research design, and ethical issues in conducting research and gathering data. This team-taught subject is for doctoral students working on emerging technologies at the interface of technology, policy and societal issues. It integrates concepts of research strategy and design from a variety of disciplines. The class addresses problem identification and formulation of research topics, the role of qualitative and quantitative research methods, and the use of various data collection techniques. Coursework focuses on students' thesis proposals, faculty-student study panels, critical evaluation of research design, and ethical issues in conducting research and gathering data.

Subjects

ESD.85 | ESD.85 | 17.312 | 17.312 | STS.461 | STS.461 | uncertainty | uncertainty | risk | risk | politics | politics | forecasting | forecasting | future | future | prediction | prediction | disaster | disaster | space shuttle | space shuttle | nuclear power | nuclear power | nuclear energy | nuclear energy | energy policy | energy policy | government | government | technology assessment | technology assessment | OTA | OTA | GPS | GPS | internet | internet | packet switching | packet switching | data network | data network | military | military | DEC | DEC | Digital Equipment | Digital Equipment | drug | drug | pharmaceutical | pharmaceutical | air transport | air transport | aircraft | aircraft | public policy | public policy | industrial policy | industrial policy | UAV | UAV | decision | decision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Out of Context: A Course on Computer Systems That Adapt To, and Learn From, Context (MIT) MAS.963 Out of Context: A Course on Computer Systems That Adapt To, and Learn From, Context (MIT)

Description

Increasingly, we are realizing that to make computer systems more intelligent and responsive to users, we will have to make them more sensitive to context. Traditional hardware and software design overlooks context because it conceptualizes systems as input-output functions. Systems take input explicitly given to them by a human, act upon that input alone and produce explicit output. But this view is too restrictive. Smart computers, intelligent agent software, and digital devices of the future will also have to operate on data that they observe or gather for themselves. They may have to sense their environment, decide which aspects of a situation are really important, and infer the user's intention from concrete actions. The system's actions may be dependent on time, place, or the histo Increasingly, we are realizing that to make computer systems more intelligent and responsive to users, we will have to make them more sensitive to context. Traditional hardware and software design overlooks context because it conceptualizes systems as input-output functions. Systems take input explicitly given to them by a human, act upon that input alone and produce explicit output. But this view is too restrictive. Smart computers, intelligent agent software, and digital devices of the future will also have to operate on data that they observe or gather for themselves. They may have to sense their environment, decide which aspects of a situation are really important, and infer the user's intention from concrete actions. The system's actions may be dependent on time, place, or the histo

Subjects

omputer systems | omputer systems | computer systems | computer systems | input | input | context | context | computer systems that adapt | computer systems that adapt | smart computers | smart computers | intelligent agent software | intelligent agent software | digital devices of the future | digital devices of the future | context-aware application | context-aware application | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence

License

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