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ón ón

Description

El curso trata sobre los análisis de imágenes a través de computadores que se están implantando en la industria con el fin de lograr una mayor interactuación entre las máquinas y el entorno que las rodea y de conseguir un control de calidad total de los productos fabricados. Para ello se revisan los tipos básicos de elementos y sensores, viéndose las ventajas e inconvenientes de cada uno de ellos, así como las técnicas más usuales de procesar la información que proveen y se presentan diversos métodos para el reconocimiento de patrones. El curso trata sobre los análisis de imágenes a través de computadores que se están implantando en la industria con el fin de lograr una mayor interactuación entre las máquinas y el entorno que las rodea y de conseguir un control de calidad total de los productos fabricados. Para ello se revisan los tipos básicos de elementos y sensores, viéndose las ventajas e inconvenientes de cada uno de ellos, así como las técnicas más usuales de procesar la información que proveen y se presentan diversos métodos para el reconocimiento de patrones.

Subjects

ón de características | ón de características | áster | áster | ón por computador | ón por computador | ágenes digitales | ágenes digitales | Reconocimiento de objetos | Reconocimiento de objetos | ón de imágenes | ón de imágenes | ágenes | ágenes | ógicas y descripción de objetos | ógicas y descripción de objetos | ía de Sistemas y Automática | ía de Sistemas y Automática | 2010 | 2010 | áticos | áticos | ía Industrial | ía Industrial

License

Copyright 2015, UC3M http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/

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7.343 When Development Goes Awry: How Cancer Co-opts Mechanisms of Embryogensis (MIT) 7.343 When Development Goes Awry: How Cancer Co-opts Mechanisms of Embryogensis (MIT)

Description

During this course, we will study the similarities between cancer and normal development to understand how tumors co-opt normal developmental processes to facilitate cancer initiation, maintenance and progression. We will examine critical signaling pathways that govern these processes and, importantly, how some of these pathways hold promise as therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. We will discuss how future treatments might be personalized to target cancer cells in specific patients. We will also consider examples of newly-approved drugs that have dramatically helped patients combat this devastating disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary res During this course, we will study the similarities between cancer and normal development to understand how tumors co-opt normal developmental processes to facilitate cancer initiation, maintenance and progression. We will examine critical signaling pathways that govern these processes and, importantly, how some of these pathways hold promise as therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. We will discuss how future treatments might be personalized to target cancer cells in specific patients. We will also consider examples of newly-approved drugs that have dramatically helped patients combat this devastating disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary res

Subjects

cancer | cancer | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | sonic hedgehog | sonic hedgehog | tumor | tumor | signaling | signaling | proto-oncogene | proto-oncogene | Kras | Kras | apoptosis | apoptosis | self-renewal | self-renewal | regeneration | regeneration | angiogenesis | angiogenesis | VEGF | VEGF | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | metastasis | metastasis | microRNA | microRNA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT) 7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT)

Description

In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f

Subjects

cell | cell | genetic material | genetic material | cell death | cell death | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | mutations | mutations | genes | genes | DNA replication | DNA replication | cell cycle | cell cycle | damaged DNA | damaged DNA | genome | genome | tumor formation | tumor formation | anti-cancer drugs | anti-cancer drugs | viruses | viruses | cellular controls | cellular controls

License

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7.22 Developmental Biology (MIT) 7.22 Developmental Biology (MIT)

Description

This graduate and advanced undergraduate level lecture and literature discussion course covers the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate animal development. Evolutionary mechanisms are emphasized as well as the discussion of relevant diseases. Vertebrate (mouse, chick, frog, fish) and invertebrate (fly, worm) models are covered. Specific topics include formation of early body plan, cell type determination, organogenesis, morphogenesis, stem cells, cloning, and issues in human development. This graduate and advanced undergraduate level lecture and literature discussion course covers the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate animal development. Evolutionary mechanisms are emphasized as well as the discussion of relevant diseases. Vertebrate (mouse, chick, frog, fish) and invertebrate (fly, worm) models are covered. Specific topics include formation of early body plan, cell type determination, organogenesis, morphogenesis, stem cells, cloning, and issues in human development.

Subjects

animal development | animal development | developmental biology | developmental biology | evolution | evolution | formation of early body plan | formation of early body plan | cell type determination | cell type determination | organogenesis | organogenesis | morphogenesis | morphogenesis | stem cells | stem cells | cloning | cloning | human development | human development

License

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7.342 Cancer Biology: From Basic Research to the Clinic (MIT) 7.342 Cancer Biology: From Basic Research to the Clinic (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In 1971, President Nixon declared the "War on Cancer," but after three decades the war is still raging. How much progress have we made toward winning the war and what are we doing to improve the fight? Understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis is crucial to the development of innovative therapy for cancer patients. Insights into these processes have been gleaned through basic research using biochemical, molecular, and genetic ana This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. In 1971, President Nixon declared the "War on Cancer," but after three decades the war is still raging. How much progress have we made toward winning the war and what are we doing to improve the fight? Understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis is crucial to the development of innovative therapy for cancer patients. Insights into these processes have been gleaned through basic research using biochemical, molecular, and genetic ana

Subjects

cancer | cancer | tumor | tumor | metastasis | metastasis | genetic analysis | genetic analysis | cancer biology | cancer biology | model organisms | model organisms | genetic pathways | genetic pathways | uncontrolled growth | uncontrolled growth | tumor suppressor genes | tumor suppressor genes | oncogenes | oncogenes | tumor initiation | tumor initiation | cell cycle | cell cycle | chromosomal aberration | chromosomal aberration | apoptosis | apoptosis | cell death | cell death | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | proto-oncogene | proto-oncogene | mutation | mutation | DNA mismatch repair | DNA mismatch repair | telomeres | telomeres | mouse models | mouse models | tissue specificity | tissue specificity | malignancy | malignancy | stem cells | stem cells | therapeutic resistance | therapeutic resistance | differentiation | differentiation | caner research | caner research | cancer therapeutics | cancer therapeutics | chemotherapy | chemotherapy

License

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7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT) 7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT)

Description

Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology. Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology.

Subjects

microbiology | microbiology | genetics | genetics | rhodococcus | rhodococcus | bacteria | bacteria | genes | genes | plasmid manipulation | plasmid manipulation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | PCR | PCR | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | enzyme assays | enzyme assays | gene expression | gene expression | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | Gram-positive | Gram-positive | gram-negative | gram-negative | bioconversion processes | bioconversion processes | synthesis | synthesis | precursors | precursors | metabolites | metabolites | genetic complementation | genetic complementation | laboratory | laboratory | lab | lab

License

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9.14 Brain Structure and its Origins (MIT) 9.14 Brain Structure and its Origins (MIT)

Description

This course covers major CNS structures with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include basic patterns of connections in CNS, embryogenesis, PNS anatomy and development, process outgrowth and synaptogenesis, growth factors and cell survival, spinal and hindbrain anatomy, and development of regional specificity with an introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution. A review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture) is also covered as well as the trigeminal system, retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration, neocortex anatomy and development, the olfactory system, corpus striatum, brain transplants, the limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity. This course covers major CNS structures with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include basic patterns of connections in CNS, embryogenesis, PNS anatomy and development, process outgrowth and synaptogenesis, growth factors and cell survival, spinal and hindbrain anatomy, and development of regional specificity with an introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution. A review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture) is also covered as well as the trigeminal system, retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration, neocortex anatomy and development, the olfactory system, corpus striatum, brain transplants, the limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.

Subjects

CNS structures | CNS structures | development | development | plasticity | plasticity | anatomy | anatomy | tissue culture | tissue culture | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | synaptogenesis | growth factors | growth factors | cell survival | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | olfactory system | corpus striatum | corpus striatum | brain transplants | brain transplants | limbic system | limbic system | Development | Development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT) 7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT)

Description

Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology. Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology.

Subjects

microbiology | microbiology | genetics | genetics | rhodococcus | rhodococcus | bacteria | bacteria | genes | genes | plasmid manipulation | plasmid manipulation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | PCR | PCR | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | enzyme assays | enzyme assays | gene expression | gene expression | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | Gram-positive | Gram-positive | gram-negative | gram-negative | bioconversion processes | bioconversion processes | synthesis | synthesis | precursors | precursors | metabolites | metabolites | genetic complementation | genetic complementation | laboratory | laboratory | lab | lab

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Development of the Mammalian Brain (MIT) Development of the Mammalian Brain (MIT)

Description

Lectures plus guided readings and discussion with project reports, covering major CNS structures, with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include: basic patterns of connections in CNS; review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture); embryogenesis; PNS anatomy and development; process outgrowth and synaptogenesis; growth factors and cell survival; spinal and hindbrain anatomy; development of regional specificity with introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution; trigeminal system; retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration; neocortex anatomy and development; olfactory system; corpus striatum; brain transplants; limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.Technical RequirementsMedia play Lectures plus guided readings and discussion with project reports, covering major CNS structures, with emphasis on systems being used as models for experimental studies of development and plasticity. Topics include: basic patterns of connections in CNS; review of lab techniques (anatomy, tissue culture); embryogenesis; PNS anatomy and development; process outgrowth and synaptogenesis; growth factors and cell survival; spinal and hindbrain anatomy; development of regional specificity with introduction to comparative anatomy and CNS evolution; trigeminal system; retinotectal system development, plasticity, regeneration; neocortex anatomy and development; olfactory system; corpus striatum; brain transplants; limbic system and hippocampal anatomy and plasticity.Technical RequirementsMedia play

Subjects

CNS structures | CNS structures | development | development | plasticity | plasticity | anatomy | anatomy | tissue culture | tissue culture | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | synaptogenesis | growth factors | growth factors | cell survival | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | olfactory system | corpus striatum | corpus striatum | brain transplants | brain transplants | limbic system | limbic system | Mammals -- Physiology | Mammals -- Physiology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Communication (MIT) Communication (MIT)

Description

This introductory biology laboratory course covers the application of experimental techniques in microbiology, biochemistry, cell and developmental biology. Emphasis is placed on the integration of factual knowledge with understanding of the design of the experiments and data analysis in order to prepare the students for future research projects. Development of skills critical for writing about scientific findings in modern biology is also covered in the Scientific Communications portion of the curriculum, 7.02CI. Additional Faculty Dr. Katherine Bacon Schneider Dr. Jean-Francois Hamel Ms. Deborah Kruzel Dr. Megan Rokop This introductory biology laboratory course covers the application of experimental techniques in microbiology, biochemistry, cell and developmental biology. Emphasis is placed on the integration of factual knowledge with understanding of the design of the experiments and data analysis in order to prepare the students for future research projects. Development of skills critical for writing about scientific findings in modern biology is also covered in the Scientific Communications portion of the curriculum, 7.02CI. Additional Faculty Dr. Katherine Bacon Schneider Dr. Jean-Francois Hamel Ms. Deborah Kruzel Dr. Megan Rokop

Subjects

experimental biology | experimental biology | microbial genetics | microbial genetics | protein biochemistry | protein biochemistry | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | development | development | zebrafish | zebrafish | phase contrast microscopy | phase contrast microscopy | teratogenesis | teratogenesis | rna isolation | rna isolation | northern blot | northern blot | gene expression | gene expression | western blot | western blot | PCR | PCR | polymerase chain reaction | polymerase chain reaction | RNA gel | RNA gel | RNA fixation | RNA fixation | probe labeling | probe labeling | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | transposon | transposon | column chromatography | column chromatography | size-exclusion chromatography | size-exclusion chromatography | anion exchange chromatography | anion exchange chromatography | SDS-Page gel | SDS-Page gel | enzyme kinetics | enzyme kinetics | transformation | transformation | primers | primers

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.14 Brain Structure and Its Origins (MIT) 9.14 Brain Structure and Its Origins (MIT)

Description

Outline of mammalian functional neuroanatomy, aided by studies of comparative neuroanatomy and evolution, and of brain development. Topics include early steps to a central nervous system, basic patterns of brain and spinal cord connections, regional development and differentiation, regeneration, motor and sensory pathways and structures, systems underlying motivations, innate action patterns, formation of habits, and various cognitive functions. Lab techniques reviewed. Optional brain dissections. Outline of mammalian functional neuroanatomy, aided by studies of comparative neuroanatomy and evolution, and of brain development. Topics include early steps to a central nervous system, basic patterns of brain and spinal cord connections, regional development and differentiation, regeneration, motor and sensory pathways and structures, systems underlying motivations, innate action patterns, formation of habits, and various cognitive functions. Lab techniques reviewed. Optional brain dissections.

Subjects

CNS structures | CNS structures | development | development | plasticity | plasticity | anatomy | anatomy | tissue culture | tissue culture | embryogenesis | embryogenesis | PNS anatomy and development | PNS anatomy and development | process outgrowth | process outgrowth | synaptogenesis | synaptogenesis | growth factors | growth factors | cell survival | cell survival | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | spinal and hindbrain anatomy | comparative anatomy | comparative anatomy | CNS evolution | CNS evolution | trigeminal system | trigeminal system | retinotectal system | retinotectal system | regeneration | regeneration | neocortex anatomy | neocortex anatomy | olfactory system | olfactory system | corpus striatum | corpus striatum | brain transplants | brain transplants | limbic system | limbic system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.525J Tumor Pathophysiology and Transport Phenomena (MIT) HST.525J Tumor Pathophysiology and Transport Phenomena (MIT)

Description

Tumor pathophysiology plays a central role in the growth, invasion, metastasis and treatment of solid tumors. This class applies principles of transport phenomena to develop a systems-level, quantitative understanding of angiogenesis, blood flow and microcirculation, metabolism and microenvironment, transport and binding of small and large molecules, movement of cancer and immune cells, metastatic process, and treatment response. Additional Faculty Dr. Pat D'Amore Dr. Dan Duda Dr. Robert Langer Prof. Robert Weinberg Dr. Marsha Moses Dr. Raghu Kalluri Dr. Lance Munn Tumor pathophysiology plays a central role in the growth, invasion, metastasis and treatment of solid tumors. This class applies principles of transport phenomena to develop a systems-level, quantitative understanding of angiogenesis, blood flow and microcirculation, metabolism and microenvironment, transport and binding of small and large molecules, movement of cancer and immune cells, metastatic process, and treatment response. Additional Faculty Dr. Pat D'Amore Dr. Dan Duda Dr. Robert Langer Prof. Robert Weinberg Dr. Marsha Moses Dr. Raghu Kalluri Dr. Lance Munn

Subjects

HST.525 | HST.525 | 10.548 | 10.548 | tumor | tumor | cancer | cancer | tumor vasculature | tumor vasculature | antiangiogenesis | antiangiogenesis | bone marrow-derived stem cells | bone marrow-derived stem cells | BMDC | BMDC | stem cell research | stem cell research | experimental cancer therapy | experimental cancer therapy | cancer research | cancer research | tumor-host interactions | tumor-host interactions | vascular normalization | vascular normalization | vascular transport | vascular transport | interstitial transport | interstitial transport | lymphatic transport | lymphatic transport | microcirculation | microcirculation | molecular therapeutics | molecular therapeutics | blood vessels | blood vessels | angiogenesis | angiogenesis | drug delivery | drug delivery | intravital microscopy | intravital microscopy

License

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7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT) 7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT)

Description

In this class, students engage in independent research projects to probe various aspects of the physiology of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, an opportunistic pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Students use molecular genetics to examine survival in stationary phase, antibiotic resistance, phase variation, toxin production, and secondary metabolite production. Projects aim to discover the molecular basis for these processes using both classical and cutting-edge techniques. These include plasmid manipulation, genetic complementation, mutagenesis, PCR, DNA sequencing, enzyme assays, and gene expression studies. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are also emphasized. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials In this class, students engage in independent research projects to probe various aspects of the physiology of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, an opportunistic pathogen isolated from the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Students use molecular genetics to examine survival in stationary phase, antibiotic resistance, phase variation, toxin production, and secondary metabolite production. Projects aim to discover the molecular basis for these processes using both classical and cutting-edge techniques. These include plasmid manipulation, genetic complementation, mutagenesis, PCR, DNA sequencing, enzyme assays, and gene expression studies. Instruction and practice in written and oral communication are also emphasized. WARNING NOTICE The experiments described in these materials

Subjects

microbiology | microbiology | genetics | genetics | pseudomonas | pseudomonas | bacteria | bacteria | genes | genes | pathogen | pathogen | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | PCR | PCR | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | enzyme assays | enzyme assays | gene expression | gene expression | molecular genetics | molecular genetics | plasmid manipulation | plasmid manipulation | genetic complementation | genetic complementation | laboratory | laboratory | protocol | protocol | vector | vector | mutant | mutant | cystic fibrosis | cystic fibrosis

License

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7.343 When Development Goes Awry: How Cancer Co-opts Mechanisms of Embryogensis (MIT)

Description

During this course, we will study the similarities between cancer and normal development to understand how tumors co-opt normal developmental processes to facilitate cancer initiation, maintenance and progression. We will examine critical signaling pathways that govern these processes and, importantly, how some of these pathways hold promise as therapeutic targets for cancer treatment. We will discuss how future treatments might be personalized to target cancer cells in specific patients. We will also consider examples of newly-approved drugs that have dramatically helped patients combat this devastating disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary res

Subjects

cancer | embryogenesis | sonic hedgehog | tumor | signaling | proto-oncogene | Kras | apoptosis | self-renewal | regeneration | angiogenesis | VEGF | tumorigenesis | metastasis | microRNA

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT) 7.344 Directed Evolution: Engineering Biocatalysts (MIT)

Description

Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current Directed evolution has been used to produce enzymes with many unique properties. The technique of directed evolution comprises two essential steps: mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme to produce a library of variants, and selection of a particular variant based on its desirable catalytic properties. In this course we will examine what kinds of enzymes are worth evolving and the strategies used for library generation and enzyme selection. We will focus on those enzymes that are used in the synthesis of drugs and in biotechnological applications. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current

Subjects

evolution | evolution | biocatalyst | biocatalyst | mutation | mutation | library | library | recombination | recombination | directed evolution | directed evolution | enzyme | enzyme | point mutation | point mutation | mutagenesis | mutagenesis | DNA | DNA | gene | gene | complementation | complementation | affinity | affinity | phage | phage | ribosome display | ribosome display | yeast surface display | yeast surface display | bacterial cell surface display | bacterial cell surface display | IVC | IVC | FACS | FACS | active site | active site

License

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7.343 Sophisticated Survival Skills of Simple Microorganisms (MIT) 7.343 Sophisticated Survival Skills of Simple Microorganisms (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will discuss the microbial physiology and genetics of stress responses in aquatic ecosystems, astrobiology, bacterial pathogenesis and other environments. We will learn about classical and novel methods utilized by researchers to uncover bacterial mechanisms induced under both general and environment-specific stresses. Finally, we will compare and contrast models for bacterial stress responses to gain an understanding of distinct mechanisms of survival and of why there are differences among bacterial genera. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly In this course, we will discuss the microbial physiology and genetics of stress responses in aquatic ecosystems, astrobiology, bacterial pathogenesis and other environments. We will learn about classical and novel methods utilized by researchers to uncover bacterial mechanisms induced under both general and environment-specific stresses. Finally, we will compare and contrast models for bacterial stress responses to gain an understanding of distinct mechanisms of survival and of why there are differences among bacterial genera. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly

Subjects

microbial physiology | microbial physiology | genetics | genetics | stress | stress | astrobiology | astrobiology | pathogenesis | pathogenesis | Escherichia coli | Escherichia coli | cyanobacteria | cyanobacteria | bleaching | bleaching | deprivation | deprivation | chlorosis | chlorosis | pollutants | pollutants | methylobacteria | methylobacteria | pathogen | pathogen | reactive oxygen species | reactive oxygen species | infection | infection | superoxides | superoxides | phage | phage | Deinococcus | Deinococcus | Raman spectroscopy | Raman spectroscopy

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Renal Disease

Description

Professor Chris Pugh tells us about the links between genetics, renal disease and oxygen sensing. The kidney plays a central role in our metabolism, by controlling various physiological balances. Genetics plays an important role in renal disease since gene defects lead to all sorts of malfunctions. Prof. Chris Pugh is working on the oxygen sensing functions of the body; whilst these were discovered in the context of erythropoietin production the underlying system controls about 1000 genes. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

tumour | oxygen | ischaemia and angiogenesis | hydroxylase | HIF | Physiology | tumour | oxygen | ischaemia and angiogenesis | hydroxylase | HIF | Physiology

License

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7.13 Experimental Microbial Genetics (MIT)

Description

Also referred to as the Microbial Genetics Project Lab, this is a hands-on research course designed to introduce the student to the strategies and challenges associated with microbiology research. Students take on independent and original research projects that are designed to be instructive with the goal of advancing a specific field of research in microbiology.

Subjects

microbiology | genetics | rhodococcus | bacteria | genes | plasmid manipulation | mutagenesis | PCR | DNA sequencing | enzyme assays | gene expression | molecular genetics | Gram-positive | gram-negative | bioconversion processes | synthesis | precursors | metabolites | genetic complementation | laboratory | lab

License

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HST.525J Tumor Pathophysiology and Transport Phenomena (MIT)

Description

Tumor pathophysiology plays a central role in the growth, invasion, metastasis and treatment of solid tumors. This class applies principles of transport phenomena to develop a systems-level, quantitative understanding of angiogenesis, blood flow and microcirculation, metabolism and microenvironment, transport and binding of small and large molecules, movement of cancer and immune cells, metastatic process, and treatment response. Additional Faculty Dr. Pat D'Amore Dr. Dan Duda Dr. Robert Langer Prof. Robert Weinberg Dr. Marsha Moses Dr. Raghu Kalluri Dr. Lance Munn

Subjects

HST.525 | 10.548 | tumor | cancer | tumor vasculature | antiangiogenesis | bone marrow-derived stem cells | BMDC | stem cell research | experimental cancer therapy | cancer research | tumor-host interactions | vascular normalization | vascular transport | interstitial transport | lymphatic transport | microcirculation | molecular therapeutics | blood vessels | angiogenesis | drug delivery | intravital microscopy

License

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7.27 Principles of Human Disease (MIT) 7.27 Principles of Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course covers current understanding of, and modern approaches to human disease, emphasizing the molecular and cellular basis of both genetic disease and cancer. Topics include: The Genetics of Simple and Complex Traits; Karyotypic Analysis and Positional Cloning; Genetic Diagnosis; The Roles of Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors in Tumor Initiation, Progression, and Treatment; The Interaction between Genetics and Environment; Animal Models of Human Disease; Cancer; and Conventional and Gene Therapy Treatment Strategies. This course covers current understanding of, and modern approaches to human disease, emphasizing the molecular and cellular basis of both genetic disease and cancer. Topics include: The Genetics of Simple and Complex Traits; Karyotypic Analysis and Positional Cloning; Genetic Diagnosis; The Roles of Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressors in Tumor Initiation, Progression, and Treatment; The Interaction between Genetics and Environment; Animal Models of Human Disease; Cancer; and Conventional and Gene Therapy Treatment Strategies.

Subjects

human disease | human disease | molecular basis of genetic disease | molecular basis of genetic disease | molecular basis of cancer | molecular basis of cancer | cellular basis of genetic disease | cellular basis of genetic disease | cellular basis of cancer | cellular basis of cancer | genetics of simple and complex traits | genetics of simple and complex traits | karyotypic analysis | karyotypic analysis | positional cloning | positional cloning | genetic diagnosis | genetic diagnosis | roles of oncogenes | roles of oncogenes | tumor suppressors | tumor suppressors | tumor initiation | tumor initiation | tumor progression | tumor progression | tumor treatment | tumor treatment | interaction between genetics and environment | interaction between genetics and environment | animal models of human disease | animal models of human disease | cancer | cancer | conventional treatment strategies | conventional treatment strategies | gene therapy treatment strategies | gene therapy treatment strategies

License

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT) 7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials. Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | nucleic acids | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | genetics | genetics | genes | genes | genetic material | genetic material | double helix | double helix | molecular biology | molecular biology | biotechnology | biotechnology | structure | structure | function | function | heredity | heredity | complementarity | complementarity | biological materials | biological materials | genetic code | genetic code | oligonucleotides | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | polyribosome | tRNA | tRNA | reverse transcription | reverse transcription | central dogma | central dogma | transcription | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.322J Genetic Neurobiology (MIT) 9.322J Genetic Neurobiology (MIT)

Description

Deals with the specific functions of neurons, the interactions of neurons in development, and the organization of neuronal ensembles to produce behavior, by functional analysis of mutations and molecular analysis of their genes. Concentrates on work with nematodes, fruit flies, mice, and humans. Deals with the specific functions of neurons, the interactions of neurons in development, and the organization of neuronal ensembles to produce behavior, by functional analysis of mutations and molecular analysis of their genes. Concentrates on work with nematodes, fruit flies, mice, and humans.

Subjects

functions of neurons | functions of neurons | interactions of neurons | interactions of neurons | development | development | organization | organization | behavior | behavior | functional analysis of mutations | functional analysis of mutations | molecular analysis of genes | molecular analysis of genes | nematodes | nematodes | fruit flies | fruit flies | humans | humans | 9.322 | 9.322

License

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7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT) 7.340 Ubiquitination: The Proteasome and Human Disease (MIT)

Description

This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. This seminar provides a deeper understanding of the post-translational mechanisms evolved by eukaryotic cells to target proteins for degradation. Students learn how proteins are recognized and degraded by specific machinery (the proteasome) through their previous tagging with another small protein, ubiquitin. Additional topics include principles of ubiquitin-proteasome function, its control of the most important cellular pathways, and the implication of this system in different human diseases. Finally, spe

Subjects

ubiquitination | ubiquitination | ubiquitin | ubiquitin | proteasome | proteasome | post-translational mechanisms | post-translational mechanisms | ubiquitin-conjugation system | ubiquitin-conjugation system | neurodegenerative diseases | neurodegenerative diseases | immune response | immune response | cell cycle regulation | cell cycle regulation | apoptosis | apoptosis | signal transduction pathways | signal transduction pathways | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | protein degradation | protein degradation | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation Pathway | ligases | ligases | translocated proteins | translocated proteins | misfolded proteins | misfolded proteins | trafficking membranes | trafficking membranes | cell cycle control | cell cycle control | programmed cell death | programmed cell death | Huntington's Disease | Huntington's Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease | Von Hippel-Lindau Disease

License

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7.341 Of Mice and Men: Humanized Mice in Cancer Research (MIT) 7.341 Of Mice and Men: Humanized Mice in Cancer Research (MIT)

Description

This course will act as an introduction to the latest developments in the fields of cancer biology and immunotherapy. Almost everyone knows someone whose life has been affected by cancer. Why is cancer such a difficult disease to treat? What is the best system to model the development of a human tumor? How can new treatment modalities, especially immune-based therapies that harness the natural ability of immune cells to kill target cells, be developed to treat cancer? These and other questions will be addressed in this course. We will explore the concepts of mouse models for human cancer, humanized cancer mice and cancer immunotherapy by reading recent and classic research articles. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These This course will act as an introduction to the latest developments in the fields of cancer biology and immunotherapy. Almost everyone knows someone whose life has been affected by cancer. Why is cancer such a difficult disease to treat? What is the best system to model the development of a human tumor? How can new treatment modalities, especially immune-based therapies that harness the natural ability of immune cells to kill target cells, be developed to treat cancer? These and other questions will be addressed in this course. We will explore the concepts of mouse models for human cancer, humanized cancer mice and cancer immunotherapy by reading recent and classic research articles. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These

Subjects

cancer | cancer | immunotherapy | immunotherapy | mouse models | mouse models | humanized cancer mice | humanized cancer mice | humice | humice | cancer biology | cancer biology | cancer therapy | cancer therapy | oncogenes | oncogenes | humanization | humanization | personalized mice | personalized mice

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The Role of Genes in Bipolar Disorder: Recent Findings and What They Mean. Monica Fooks Memorial Lecture

Description

Professor Paul Harrison, Head of Translational Neurobiology Research Group, Oxford, gives the 2012 Monica Fooks memorial lecture on recent findings in bipolar disorder. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

genes | genetics | psychology | somerville college | bipolar disorder | psychiatry | manic depression | monica fooks | fooks | genes | genetics | psychology | somerville college | bipolar disorder | psychiatry | manic depression | monica fooks | fooks | 2012-11-16

License

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