Array ( [:term] => genetic engineering [:results] => 24 [:ip] => 54.166.130.22 [:time] => 1493284807 ) Search results

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20.020 Introduction to Biological Engineering Design (MIT) 20.020 Introduction to Biological Engineering Design (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This class is a project-based introduction to the engineering of synthetic biological systems. Throughout the term, students develop projects that are responsive to real-world problems of their choosing, and whose solutions depend on biological technologies. Lectures, discussions, and studio exercises will introduce (1) components and control of prokaryotic and eukaryotic behavior, (2) DNA synthesis, standards, and abstraction in biological engineering, and (3) issues of human practice, including biological safety; security; ownership, sharing, and innovation; and ethics. Enrollment preference is given to freshmen. This subject was originally developed and first taught in Spring 2008 by Drew Endy and Natalie Kuldell. Many of Drew's Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This class is a project-based introduction to the engineering of synthetic biological systems. Throughout the term, students develop projects that are responsive to real-world problems of their choosing, and whose solutions depend on biological technologies. Lectures, discussions, and studio exercises will introduce (1) components and control of prokaryotic and eukaryotic behavior, (2) DNA synthesis, standards, and abstraction in biological engineering, and (3) issues of human practice, including biological safety; security; ownership, sharing, and innovation; and ethics. Enrollment preference is given to freshmen. This subject was originally developed and first taught in Spring 2008 by Drew Endy and Natalie Kuldell. Many of Drew's

Subjects

biology | biology | chemistry | chemistry | synthetic biology | synthetic biology | project | project | biotech | biotech | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | GMO | GMO | ethics | ethics | biomedical ethics | biomedical ethics | genetics | genetics | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | DNA | DNA | gene sequencing | gene sequencing | gene synthesis | gene synthesis | biohacking | biohacking | computational biology | computational biology | iGEM | iGEM | BioBrick | BioBrick | systems biology | systems biology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT) STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. We will explore the changing political choices and ethical dilemmas of American scientists from the atomic scientists of World War II to biologists in the present wrestling with the questions raised by cloning and other biotechnologies. As well as asking how we would behave if confronted with the same choices, we will try to understand the choices scientists have made by seeing them in their historical and political contexts. Some of the topics covered include: the original development of nuclear weapons and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the effects of the Cold War on American science; the space shuttle disasters; debates on the use of nuclear power, wind power, and biofuels; abuse of human subjects in psychological and othe Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. We will explore the changing political choices and ethical dilemmas of American scientists from the atomic scientists of World War II to biologists in the present wrestling with the questions raised by cloning and other biotechnologies. As well as asking how we would behave if confronted with the same choices, we will try to understand the choices scientists have made by seeing them in their historical and political contexts. Some of the topics covered include: the original development of nuclear weapons and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the effects of the Cold War on American science; the space shuttle disasters; debates on the use of nuclear power, wind power, and biofuels; abuse of human subjects in psychological and othe

Subjects

risk | risk | science | science | society | society | ethics | ethics | politics | politics | technology | technology | history | history | controversy | controversy | atomic | atomic | whistleblowing | whistleblowing | GMO | GMO | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | nuclear | nuclear | space exploration | space exploration | energy | energy | policy | policy | debate | debate | museum | museum | archeology | archeology | war | war | terrorism | terrorism | tradeoff | tradeoff | decision making | decision making | medicine | medicine | health care policy | health care policy | biotechnology | biotechnology | climate change | climate change | global warming | global warming | human subjects | human subjects

License

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24.06J Bioethics (MIT) 24.06J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers. This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

Subjects

24.06 | 24.06 | STS.006 | STS.006 | medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | life support | life support | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | enhancing or cheating | enhancing or cheating | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

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HST.508 Genomics and Computational Biology (MIT) HST.508 Genomics and Computational Biology (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course will assess the relationships among sequence, structure, and function in complex biological networks as well as progress in realistic modeling of quantitative, comprehensive, functional genomics analyses. Exercises will include algorithmic, statistical, database, and simulation approaches and practical applications to medicine, biotechnology, drug discovery, and genetic engineering. Future opportunities and current limitations will be critically addressed. In addition to the regular lecture sessions, supplementary sections are scheduled to address issues related to Perl, Mathematica and biology. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course will assess the relationships among sequence, structure, and function in complex biological networks as well as progress in realistic modeling of quantitative, comprehensive, functional genomics analyses. Exercises will include algorithmic, statistical, database, and simulation approaches and practical applications to medicine, biotechnology, drug discovery, and genetic engineering. Future opportunities and current limitations will be critically addressed. In addition to the regular lecture sessions, supplementary sections are scheduled to address issues related to Perl, Mathematica and biology.

Subjects

sequence | sequence | structure | structure | function | function | complex biological networks | complex biological networks | quantative modeling | quantative modeling | functional genomics analyses | functional genomics analyses | algorithms | algorithms | statistics | statistics | database | database | simulation | simulation | applied medicine | applied medicine | biotechnology | biotechnology | drug discovery | drug discovery | computational biology | computational biology | genetic engineering | genetic engineering

License

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STS.006J Bioethics (MIT) STS.006J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai

Subjects

medical ethics | medical ethics | ethics | ethics | genetics | genetics | stem cell | stem cell | GM | GM | genetically modified | genetically modified | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | risk | risk | biomedical | biomedical | medicine | medicine | cloning | cloning | euthanasia | euthanasia | abortion | abortion | eugenics | eugenics | slippery slope | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ transplant | organ donor | organ donor | disease | disease | public health | public health | health care | health care

License

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9.530 Cellular and Molecular Computation (MIT) 9.530 Cellular and Molecular Computation (MIT)

Description

Life as an emergent property of networks of chemical reactions involving proteins and nucleic acids. Mathematical theories of metabolism, gene regulation, signal transduction, chemotaxis, excitability, motility, mitosis, development, and immunity. Applications to directed molecular evolution, DNA computing, and metabolic and genetic engineering. Life as an emergent property of networks of chemical reactions involving proteins and nucleic acids. Mathematical theories of metabolism, gene regulation, signal transduction, chemotaxis, excitability, motility, mitosis, development, and immunity. Applications to directed molecular evolution, DNA computing, and metabolic and genetic engineering.

Subjects

emergent | emergent | network | network | chemical reactions | chemical reactions | proteins | proteins | nucleic acids | nucleic acids | metabolism | metabolism | gene regulation | gene regulation | signal transduction | signal transduction | chemotaxis | chemotaxis | excitability | excitability | motility | motility | mitosis | mitosis | development | development | immunity | immunity | molecular evolution | molecular evolution | DNA computing | DNA computing | metabolic | metabolic | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | Neural networks | Neural networks

License

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21A.240 Race and Science (MIT) 21A.240 Race and Science (MIT)

Description

This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene

Subjects

race | race | eugenics | eugenics | scientific racism | scientific racism | racial hygiene | racial hygiene | racial economy | racial economy | human biodiversity | human biodiversity | apartheid | apartheid | race and gender | race and gender | monogenist | monogenist | polygenist | polygenist | alchemy of race | alchemy of race | nazi medicine | nazi medicine | nazi racism | nazi racism | sociology of science | sociology of science | race and culture | race and culture | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | raciology. | raciology.

License

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21G.711 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition (MIT) 21G.711 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition (MIT)

Description

En este curso el estudiante perfeccionará su comunicación oral y escrita mediante el estudio y la discusión de temas relacionados al impacto social y cultural de la ciencia y la tecnología en ciertas sociedades hispanas. Algunos de los temas a tratar son los efectos de los cambios tecnológicos en la estructura familiar y comunitaria, en las relaciones entre los sexos, en la identidad personal y cultural, en el mundo natural y en los sistemas de valores, la religión, la educación y el trabajo. También se examinan y discuten diversas actitudes hacia la innovación tecnológica y científica así como las ramificaciones éticas de las decisiones tecnológicas. En este curso el estudiante perfeccionará su comunicación oral y escrita mediante el estudio y la discusión de temas relacionados al impacto social y cultural de la ciencia y la tecnología en ciertas sociedades hispanas. Algunos de los temas a tratar son los efectos de los cambios tecnológicos en la estructura familiar y comunitaria, en las relaciones entre los sexos, en la identidad personal y cultural, en el mundo natural y en los sistemas de valores, la religión, la educación y el trabajo. También se examinan y discuten diversas actitudes hacia la innovación tecnológica y científica así como las ramificaciones éticas de las decisiones tecnológicas.

Subjects

conversation | conversation | composition | composition | Spanish | Spanish | foreign language | foreign language | technology | technology | culture | culture | Español | Español | conversación | conversación | composición | composición | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | Internet addiction | Internet addiction | GMO | GMO

License

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7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology (MIT) 7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality. Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality.

Subjects

amino acids | amino acids | carboxyl group | carboxyl group | amino group | amino group | side chains | side chains | polar | polar | hydrophobic | hydrophobic | primary structure | primary structure | secondary structure | secondary structure | tertiary structure | tertiary structure | quaternary structure | quaternary structure | x-ray crystallography | x-ray crystallography | alpha helix | alpha helix | beta sheet | beta sheet | ionic bond | ionic bond | non-polar bond | non-polar bond | van der Waals interactions | van der Waals interactions | proton gradient | proton gradient | cyclic photophosphorylation | cyclic photophosphorylation | sunlight | sunlight | ATP | ATP | chlorophyll | chlorophyll | chlorophyll a | chlorophyll a | electrons | electrons | hydrogen sulfide | hydrogen sulfide | biosynthesis | biosynthesis | non-cyclic photophosphorylation | non-cyclic photophosphorylation | photosystem II | photosystem II | photosystem I | photosystem I | cyanobacteria | cyanobacteria | chloroplast | chloroplast | stroma | stroma | thylakoid membrane | thylakoid membrane | Genetics | Genetics | Mendel | Mendel | Mendel's Laws | Mendel's Laws | cloning | cloning | restriction enzymes | restriction enzymes | vector | vector | insert DNA | insert DNA | ligase | ligase | library | library | E.Coli | E.Coli | phosphatase | phosphatase | yeast | yeast | transformation | transformation | ARG1 gene | ARG1 gene | ARG1 mutant yeast | ARG1 mutant yeast | yeast wild-type | yeast wild-type | cloning by complementation | cloning by complementation | Human Beta Globin gene | Human Beta Globin gene | protein tetramer | protein tetramer | vectors | vectors | antibodies | antibodies | human promoter | human promoter | splicing | splicing | mRNA | mRNA | cDNA | cDNA | reverse transcriptase | reverse transcriptase | plasmid | plasmid | electrophoresis | electrophoresis | DNA sequencing | DNA sequencing | primer | primer | template | template | capillary tube | capillary tube | laser detector | laser detector | human genome project | human genome project | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | clone | clone | primer walking | primer walking | subcloning | subcloning | computer assembly | computer assembly | shotgun sequencing | shotgun sequencing | open reading frame | open reading frame | databases | databases | polymerase chain reaction (PCR) | polymerase chain reaction (PCR) | polymerase | polymerase | nucleotides | nucleotides | Thermus aquaticus | Thermus aquaticus | Taq polymerase | Taq polymerase | thermocycler | thermocycler | resequencing | resequencing | in vitro fertilization | in vitro fertilization | pre-implantation diagnostics | pre-implantation diagnostics | forensics | forensics | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | DNA sequences | DNA sequences | therapeutic proteins | therapeutic proteins | E. coli | E. coli | disease-causing mutations | disease-causing mutations | cleavage of DNA | cleavage of DNA | bacterial transformation | bacterial transformation | recombinant DNA revolution | recombinant DNA revolution | biotechnology industry | biotechnology industry | Robert Swanson | Robert Swanson | toxin gene | toxin gene | pathogenic bacterium | pathogenic bacterium | biomedical research | biomedical research | S. Pyogenes | S. Pyogenes | origin of replication | origin of replication

License

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2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design (MIT) 2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design (MIT)

Description

This is an advanced course on modeling, design, integration and best practices for use of machine elements such as bearings, springs, gears, cams and mechanisms. Modeling and analysis of these elements is based upon extensive application of physics, mathematics and core mechanical engineering principles (solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, manufacturing, estimation, computer simulation, etc.). These principles are reinforced via (1) hands-on laboratory experiences wherein students conduct experiments and disassemble machines and (2) a substantial design project wherein students model, design, fabricate and characterize a mechanical system that is relevant to a real world application. Students master the materials via problems sets that are directly related to, and coordinated with, the deliv This is an advanced course on modeling, design, integration and best practices for use of machine elements such as bearings, springs, gears, cams and mechanisms. Modeling and analysis of these elements is based upon extensive application of physics, mathematics and core mechanical engineering principles (solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, manufacturing, estimation, computer simulation, etc.). These principles are reinforced via (1) hands-on laboratory experiences wherein students conduct experiments and disassemble machines and (2) a substantial design project wherein students model, design, fabricate and characterize a mechanical system that is relevant to a real world application. Students master the materials via problems sets that are directly related to, and coordinated with, the deliv

Subjects

biology | biology | chemistry | chemistry | synthetic biology | synthetic biology | project | project | biotech | biotech | genetic engineering | genetic engineering | GMO | GMO | ethics | ethics | biomedical ethics | biomedical ethics | genetics | genetics | recombinant DNA | recombinant DNA | DNA | DNA | gene sequencing | gene sequencing | gene synthesis | gene synthesis | biohacking | biohacking | computational biology | computational biology | iGEM | iGEM | BioBrick | BioBrick | systems biology | systems biology | machine design | machine design | hardware | hardware | machine element | machine element | design process | design process | design layout | design layout | prototype | prototype | mechanism | mechanism | engineering | engineering | fabrication | fabrication | lathe | lathe | precision engineering | precision engineering | group project | group project | project management | project management | CAD | CAD | fatigue | fatigue | Gantt chart | Gantt chart

License

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7.341 Harnessing the Biosphere: Natural Products and Biotechnology (MIT) 7.341 Harnessing the Biosphere: Natural Products and Biotechnology (MIT)

Description

What do the organisms of the biosphere, specifically microorganisms, have to offer to biotechnological endeavors? In this course we will focus on the production of biomolecules using microbial systems. We will discuss potential growth substrates (such as agricultural waste and carbon dioxide) that can be used and learn about both established and cutting-edge manipulation techniques in the field of synthetic biology. We will also cover the production of biofuels, bioplastics, amino acids (e.g. lysine), food additives (e.g. monosodium glutamate, MSG), specialty chemicals (e.g. succinate), and biopharmaceuticals (e.g. plasmids for gene therapy). This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an What do the organisms of the biosphere, specifically microorganisms, have to offer to biotechnological endeavors? In this course we will focus on the production of biomolecules using microbial systems. We will discuss potential growth substrates (such as agricultural waste and carbon dioxide) that can be used and learn about both established and cutting-edge manipulation techniques in the field of synthetic biology. We will also cover the production of biofuels, bioplastics, amino acids (e.g. lysine), food additives (e.g. monosodium glutamate, MSG), specialty chemicals (e.g. succinate), and biopharmaceuticals (e.g. plasmids for gene therapy). This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an

Subjects

microorganisms | microorganisms | biomolecules | biomolecules | microbial systems | microbial systems | synthetic biology | synthetic biology | biofuels | biofuels | bioplastics | bioplastics | amino acids | amino acids | lysine | lysine | food additives | food additives | monosodium glutamate (MSG) | monosodium glutamate (MSG) | specialty chemicals | specialty chemicals | succinate | succinate | biopharmaceuticals | biopharmaceuticals | enzymes | enzymes | antibiotics and biocompatible materials | antibiotics and biocompatible materials | microbial biotechnology | microbial biotechnology | genetic engineering | genetic engineering

License

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2.72 Elements of Mechanical Design (MIT)

Description

This is an advanced course on modeling, design, integration and best practices for use of machine elements such as bearings, springs, gears, cams and mechanisms. Modeling and analysis of these elements is based upon extensive application of physics, mathematics and core mechanical engineering principles (solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, manufacturing, estimation, computer simulation, etc.). These principles are reinforced via (1) hands-on laboratory experiences wherein students conduct experiments and disassemble machines and (2) a substantial design project wherein students model, design, fabricate and characterize a mechanical system that is relevant to a real world application. Students master the materials via problems sets that are directly related to, and coordinated with, the deliv

Subjects

biology | chemistry | synthetic biology | project | biotech | genetic engineering | GMO | ethics | biomedical ethics | genetics | recombinant DNA | DNA | gene sequencing | gene synthesis | biohacking | computational biology | iGEM | BioBrick | systems biology | machine design | hardware | machine element | design process | design layout | prototype | mechanism | engineering | fabrication | lathe | precision engineering | group project | project management | CAD | fatigue | Gantt chart

License

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Uehiro Special Double Seminar: Enhancement

Description

Associate Professor Rob Sparrow (Monash) and PhD student Chris Gyngell (ANU) present talks on the topic of human enhancement. Rob Sparrow on 'Enhancement and Obsolescence: Avoiding An "Enhanced Rat Race"': A claim about continuing technological progress plays an essential, if unacknowledged, role in the philosophical literature on "human enhancement". Advocates for enhancement typically point to the rapid progress being made in the development of biotechnologies, information technology, and nanotechnology as evidence that we will soon be able to achieve significant improvements on normal human capacities through applications of these technologies. In this paper, I will argue that - should it eventuate - continuous improvement in enhancement technologies may prove more bane than bene Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

human enhancement; bioethics; biotechnologies; genetic engineering

License

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21G.711 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition (MIT)

Description

En este curso el estudiante perfeccionar su comunicacin oral y escrita mediante el estudio y la discusin de temas relacionados al impacto social y cultural de la ciencia y la tecnologa en ciertas sociedades hispanas. Algunos de los temas a tratar son los efectos de los cambios tecnolgicos en la estructura familiar y comunitaria, en las relaciones entre los sexos, en la identidad personal y cultural, en el mundo natural y en los sistemas de valores, la religin, la educacin y el trabajo. Tambin se examinan y discuten diversas actitudes hacia la innovacin tecnolgica y cientfica as como las ramificaciones ticas de las decisiones tecnolgicas.

Subjects

conversation | composition | Spanish | foreign language | technology | culture | ol | n | genetic engineering | Internet addiction | GMO

License

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24.06J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

This course does not seek to provide answers to ethical questions. Instead, the course hopes to teach students two things. First, how do you recognize ethical or moral problems in science and medicine? When something does not feel right (whether cloning, or failing to clone) — what exactly is the nature of the discomfort? What kind of tensions and conflicts exist within biomedicine? Second, how can you think productively about ethical and moral problems? What processes create them? Why do people disagree about them? How can an understanding of philosophy or history help resolve them? By the end of the course students will hopefully have sophisticated and nuanced ideas about problems in bioethics, even if they do not have comfortable answers.

Subjects

24.06 | STS.006 | medical ethics | ethics | genetics | life support | stem cell | GM | genetically modified | genetic engineering | risk | biomedical | medicine | cloning | euthanasia | enhancing or cheating | abortion | eugenics | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ donor | disease | public health | health care

License

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STS.011 American Science: Ethical Conflicts and Political Choices (MIT)

Description

We will explore the changing political choices and ethical dilemmas of American scientists from the atomic scientists of World War II to biologists in the present wrestling with the questions raised by cloning and other biotechnologies. As well as asking how we would behave if confronted with the same choices, we will try to understand the choices scientists have made by seeing them in their historical and political contexts. Some of the topics covered include: the original development of nuclear weapons and the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; the effects of the Cold War on American science; the space shuttle disasters; debates on the use of nuclear power, wind power, and biofuels; abuse of human subjects in psychological and other experiments; deliberations on genetically modified food

Subjects

risk | science | society | ethics | politics | technology | history | controversy | atomic | whistleblowing | GMO | genetic engineering | nuclear | space exploration | energy | policy | debate | museum | archeology | war | terrorism | tradeoff | decision making | medicine | health care policy | biotechnology | climate change | global warming | human subjects

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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HST.508 Genomics and Computational Biology (MIT)

Description

This course will assess the relationships among sequence, structure, and function in complex biological networks as well as progress in realistic modeling of quantitative, comprehensive, functional genomics analyses. Exercises will include algorithmic, statistical, database, and simulation approaches and practical applications to medicine, biotechnology, drug discovery, and genetic engineering. Future opportunities and current limitations will be critically addressed. In addition to the regular lecture sessions, supplementary sections are scheduled to address issues related to Perl, Mathematica and biology.

Subjects

sequence | structure | function | complex biological networks | quantative modeling | functional genomics analyses | algorithms | statistics | database | simulation | applied medicine | biotechnology | drug discovery | computational biology | genetic engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.341 Harnessing the Biosphere: Natural Products and Biotechnology (MIT)

Description

What do the organisms of the biosphere, specifically microorganisms, have to offer to biotechnological endeavors? In this course we will focus on the production of biomolecules using microbial systems. We will discuss potential growth substrates (such as agricultural waste and carbon dioxide) that can be used and learn about both established and cutting-edge manipulation techniques in the field of synthetic biology. We will also cover the production of biofuels, bioplastics, amino acids (e.g. lysine), food additives (e.g. monosodium glutamate, MSG), specialty chemicals (e.g. succinate), and biopharmaceuticals (e.g. plasmids for gene therapy). This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an

Subjects

microorganisms | biomolecules | microbial systems | synthetic biology | biofuels | bioplastics | amino acids | lysine | food additives | monosodium glutamate (MSG) | specialty chemicals | succinate | biopharmaceuticals | enzymes | antibiotics and biocompatible materials | microbial biotechnology | genetic engineering

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.01SC Fundamentals of Biology (MIT)

Description

Fundamentals of Biology focuses on the basic principles of biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, and recombinant DNA. These principles are necessary to understanding the basic mechanisms of life and anchor the biological knowledge that is required to understand many of the challenges in everyday life, from human health and disease to loss of biodiversity and environmental quality.

Subjects

amino acids | carboxyl group | amino group | side chains | polar | hydrophobic | primary structure | secondary structure | tertiary structure | quaternary structure | x-ray crystallography | alpha helix | beta sheet | ionic bond | non-polar bond | van der Waals interactions | proton gradient | cyclic photophosphorylation | sunlight | ATP | chlorophyll | chlorophyll a | electrons | hydrogen sulfide | biosynthesis | non-cyclic photophosphorylation | photosystem II | photosystem I | cyanobacteria | chloroplast | stroma | thylakoid membrane | Genetics | Mendel | Mendel's Laws | cloning | restriction enzymes | vector | insert DNA | ligase | library | E.Coli | phosphatase | yeast | transformation | ARG1 gene | ARG1 mutant yeast | yeast wild-type | cloning by complementation | Human Beta Globin gene | protein tetramer | vectors | antibodies | human promoter | splicing | mRNA | cDNA | reverse transcriptase | plasmid | electrophoresis | DNA sequencing | primer | template | capillary tube | laser detector | human genome project | recombinant DNA | clone | primer walking | subcloning | computer assembly | shotgun sequencing | open reading frame | databases | polymerase chain reaction (PCR) | polymerase | nucleotides | Thermus aquaticus | Taq polymerase | thermocycler | resequencing | in vitro fertilization | pre-implantation diagnostics | forensics | genetic engineering | DNA sequences | therapeutic proteins | E. coli | disease-causing mutations | cleavage of DNA | bacterial transformation | recombinant DNA revolution | biotechnology industry | Robert Swanson | toxin gene | pathogenic bacterium | biomedical research | S. Pyogenes | origin of replication

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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20.020 Introduction to Biological Engineering Design (MIT)

Description

This class is a project-based introduction to the engineering of synthetic biological systems. Throughout the term, students develop projects that are responsive to real-world problems of their choosing, and whose solutions depend on biological technologies. Lectures, discussions, and studio exercises will introduce (1) components and control of prokaryotic and eukaryotic behavior, (2) DNA synthesis, standards, and abstraction in biological engineering, and (3) issues of human practice, including biological safety; security; ownership, sharing, and innovation; and ethics. Enrollment preference is given to freshmen. This subject was originally developed and first taught in Spring 2008 by Drew Endy and Natalie Kuldell. Many of Drew's materials are used in this Spring 2009 version, and are i

Subjects

biology | chemistry | synthetic biology | project | biotech | genetic engineering | GMO | ethics | biomedical ethics | genetics | recombinant DNA | DNA | gene sequencing | gene synthesis | biohacking | computational biology | iGEM | BioBrick | systems biology

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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9.530 Cellular and Molecular Computation (MIT)

Description

Life as an emergent property of networks of chemical reactions involving proteins and nucleic acids. Mathematical theories of metabolism, gene regulation, signal transduction, chemotaxis, excitability, motility, mitosis, development, and immunity. Applications to directed molecular evolution, DNA computing, and metabolic and genetic engineering.

Subjects

emergent | network | chemical reactions | proteins | nucleic acids | metabolism | gene regulation | signal transduction | chemotaxis | excitability | motility | mitosis | development | immunity | molecular evolution | DNA computing | metabolic | genetic engineering | Neural networks

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21F.711 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition (MIT)

Description

En este curso el estudiante perfeccionar su comunicacin oral y escrita mediante el estudio y la discusin de temas relacionados al impacto social y cultural de la ciencia y la tecnologa en ciertas sociedades hispanas. Algunos de los temas a tratar son los efectos de los cambios tecnolgicos en la estructura familiar y comunitaria, en las relaciones entre los sexos, en la identidad personal y cultural, en el mundo natural y en los sistemas de valores, la religin, la educacin y el trabajo. Tambin se examinan y discuten diversas actitudes hacia la innovacin tecnolgica y cientfica as como las ramificaciones ticas de las decisiones tecnolgicas.

Subjects

conversation | composition | Spanish | foreign language | technology | culture | ol | n | genetic engineering | Internet addiction | GMO

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.240 Race and Science (MIT)

Description

This course examines one of the most enduring and influential forms of identity and experience in the Americas and Europe, and in particular the ways race and racism have been created, justified, or contested in scientific practice and discourse. Drawing on classical and contemporary readings from Du Bois to Gould to Gilroy, we ask whether the logic of race might be changing in the world of genomics and informatics, and with that changed logic, how we can respond today to new configurations of race, science, technology, and inequality. Considered are the rise of evolutionary racism; debates about eugenics in the early twentieth century; Nazi notions of "racial hygiene"; nation-building projects and race in Latin America; and the movement in modern biology from race to populations to gene

Subjects

race | eugenics | scientific racism | racial hygiene | racial economy | human biodiversity | apartheid | race and gender | monogenist | polygenist | alchemy of race | nazi medicine | nazi racism | sociology of science | race and culture | genetic engineering | raciology.

License

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STS.006J Bioethics (MIT)

Description

Many difficult ethical questions have arisen from the explosive growth of biomedical research and the health-care industry since World War II. When and how should doctors be allowed to help patients end their lives? Should embryos be cloned for research and/or reproduction? Should parents be given control over the genetic make-up of their children? What sorts of living things is it appropriate to use as research subjects? How should we distribute scarce and expensive medical resources? While some of these questions are genuinely new, products of rapid changes in biomedical technology, others have been debated for centuries. Drawing on philosophy, history, and anthropology, this course will show students how problems in bioethics can be approached from a variety of perspectives, with the ai

Subjects

medical ethics | ethics | genetics | stem cell | GM | genetically modified | genetic engineering | risk | biomedical | medicine | cloning | euthanasia | abortion | eugenics | slippery slope | organ transplant | organ donor | disease | public health | health care

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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