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7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT) 7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT)

Description

In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f

Subjects

cell | cell | genetic material | genetic material | cell death | cell death | tumorigenesis | tumorigenesis | mutations | mutations | genes | genes | DNA replication | DNA replication | cell cycle | cell cycle | damaged DNA | damaged DNA | genome | genome | tumor formation | tumor formation | anti-cancer drugs | anti-cancer drugs | viruses | viruses | cellular controls | cellular controls

License

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT) 7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials. Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | nucleic acids | DNA | DNA | RNA | RNA | genetics | genetics | genes | genes | genetic material | genetic material | double helix | double helix | molecular biology | molecular biology | biotechnology | biotechnology | structure | structure | function | function | heredity | heredity | complementarity | complementarity | biological materials | biological materials | genetic code | genetic code | oligonucleotides | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | polyribosome | tRNA | tRNA | reverse transcription | reverse transcription | central dogma | central dogma | transcription | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Down's syndrome

Description

This topic describes the main features of Down's syndrome and is accompanied by photographs highlighting dysmorphic features. Graphical and tabular information illustrate the intellectual capacity, life expectancy, functional ability and social independence, and medical checks of those with Down's syndrome.

Subjects

chromosome 21 | trisomy 21 | 47 chromosomes | extra genetic material | slant eyes | large tongue | ukoer | ooer | medev | Medicine and Dentistry | Biological Sciences | Subjects allied to Medicine | SAFETY | Learning | Teaching | Institutions | Students | UK EL07 = SCQF 7 | Higher Certificate | NICAT 4 | CQFW 4 | NVQ 4 | Advanced Higher | SVQ 4 | HN Certificate | dentistry | A000

License

Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.340 Avoiding Genomic Instability: DNA Replication, the Cell Cycle, and Cancer (MIT)

Description

In this class we will learn about how the process of DNA replication is regulated throughout the cell cycle and what happens when DNA replication goes awry. How does the cell know when and where to begin replicating its DNA? How does a cell prevent its DNA from being replicated more than once? How does damaged DNA cause the cell to arrest DNA replication until that damage has been repaired? And how is the duplication of the genome coordinated with other essential processes? We will examine both classical and current papers from the scientific literature to provide answers to these questions and to gain insights into how biologists have approached such problems. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored f

Subjects

cell | genetic material | cell death | tumorigenesis | mutations | genes | DNA replication | cell cycle | damaged DNA | genome | tumor formation | anti-cancer drugs | viruses | cellular controls

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.A12 Freshman Seminar: Structural Basis of Genetic Material: Nucleic Acids (MIT)

Description

Since the discovery of the structure of the DNA double helix in 1953 by Watson and Crick, the information on detailed molecular structures of DNA and RNA, namely, the foundation of genetic material, has expanded rapidly. This discovery is the beginning of the "Big Bang" of molecular biology and biotechnology. In this seminar, students discuss, from a historical perspective and current developments, the importance of pursuing the detailed structural basis of genetic materials.

Subjects

nucleic acids | DNA | RNA | genetics | genes | genetic material | double helix | molecular biology | biotechnology | structure | function | heredity | complementarity | biological materials | genetic code | oligonucleotides | supercoiled DNA | polyribosome | tRNA | reverse transcription | central dogma | transcription

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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