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21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT) 21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT)

Description

Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy). Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy).

Subjects

writing | writing | creative writing | creative writing | fiction | fiction | fiction writing | fiction writing | writing fiction | writing fiction | genre fiction | genre fiction | genre | genre | genres | genres | fantasy | fantasy | fantasy writing | fantasy writing | science fiction | science fiction | mystery | mystery | historical fiction | historical fiction | preternatural romance | preternatural romance | horror | horror | steampunk | steampunk | workshop | workshop | revision | revision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.759 Writing Science Fiction (MIT) 21W.759 Writing Science Fiction (MIT)

Description

This class will focus on the craft of writing genre science fiction. Students write and read science fiction and analyze and discuss stories written for the class. For the first eight weeks, readings in contemporary science fiction accompany lectures and formal writing assignments intended to illuminate various aspects of writing craft as well as the particular problems of writing science fiction. The rest of the term is given to roundtable workshops on student's stories. This class will focus on the craft of writing genre science fiction. Students write and read science fiction and analyze and discuss stories written for the class. For the first eight weeks, readings in contemporary science fiction accompany lectures and formal writing assignments intended to illuminate various aspects of writing craft as well as the particular problems of writing science fiction. The rest of the term is given to roundtable workshops on student's stories.

Subjects

writing | writing | scifi | scifi | sci fi | sci fi | science fiction | science fiction | fantasy | fantasy | fiction | fiction | literature | literature | genre | genre | workshop | workshop | speculative fiction | speculative fiction | subgenre | subgenre | world building | world building | worldbuilding | worldbuilding | protagonist | protagonist | characters | characters | future | future | theme | theme | futurist | futurist | publishing | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT)

Description

Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy).

Subjects

writing | creative writing | fiction | fiction writing | writing fiction | genre fiction | genre | genres | fantasy | fantasy writing | science fiction | mystery | historical fiction | preternatural romance | horror | steampunk | workshop | revision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.758 Genre Fiction Workshop (MIT)

Description

Some argue that genre fiction is only a marketing category, but other critics say that different genres meet specific expectations of readers. This course examines these different agreements of what the reader wants and what the writer provides under the aegis of different genres. We will look at how genres are divided into subgenres, and how they are combined into cross-genre work, always keeping in mind the Reader-Writer Contact that is at the heart of genre writing. We shall also think about the ways in which crossing genres has led to the establishment of new genres (steampunk, preternatural romance) and strongly established subgenres (historical mystery, urban fantasy).

Subjects

writing | creative writing | fiction | fiction writing | writing fiction | genre fiction | genre | genres | fantasy | fantasy writing | science fiction | mystery | historical fiction | preternatural romance | horror | steampunk | workshop | revision

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Old English Then and Now

Description

This final lecture looks briefly at how Old English has been reused by modern writers, but specifically at how the Anglo-Saxons have been portrayed on film, and what film studies can do to help us enjoy Old English poetry.

Subjects

old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | film | genre | #greatwriters | Q321 | Q310 | 1 | ukoer | old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | film | genre | #greatwriters | Q321 | Q310 | 1

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Old English Then and Now

Description

This final lecture looks briefly at how Old English has been reused by modern writers, but specifically at how the Anglo-Saxons have been portrayed on film, and what film studies can do to help us enjoy Old English poetry.

Subjects

old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | film | genre | #greatwriters | Q321 | Q310 | 1 | ukoer | old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | film | genre | #greatwriters | Q321 | Q310 | 1

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Old English Then and Now

Description

This final lecture looks briefly at how Old English has been reused by modern writers, but specifically at how the Anglo-Saxons have been portrayed on film, and what film studies can do to help us enjoy Old English poetry.

Subjects

old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | film | genre | ukoer | old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | film | genre

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT) 21L.000J Writing About Literature (MIT)

Description

Students, scholars, bloggers, reviewers, fans, and book-group members write about literature, but so do authors themselves. Through the ways they engage with their own texts and those of other artists, sampling, remixing, and rethinking texts and genres, writers reflect on and inspire questions about the creative process. We will examine Mary Shelley's reshaping of Milton's Paradise Lost, German fairy tales, tales of scientific discovery, and her husband's poems to make Frankenstein (1818, 1831); Melville's redesign of a travel narrative into a Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856); and Alison Bechdel's rewriting of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) in her graphic novel Fun Home (2006). Showings of film versions of some of these works will allow us to project forw Students, scholars, bloggers, reviewers, fans, and book-group members write about literature, but so do authors themselves. Through the ways they engage with their own texts and those of other artists, sampling, remixing, and rethinking texts and genres, writers reflect on and inspire questions about the creative process. We will examine Mary Shelley's reshaping of Milton's Paradise Lost, German fairy tales, tales of scientific discovery, and her husband's poems to make Frankenstein (1818, 1831); Melville's redesign of a travel narrative into a Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856); and Alison Bechdel's rewriting of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) in her graphic novel Fun Home (2006). Showings of film versions of some of these works will allow us to project forw

Subjects

21L.000 | 21L.000 | 21W.734 | 21W.734 | Rethinking texts and genres | Rethinking texts and genres | Mary Shelley’s rewrite of Milton’s Paradise Lost | Mary Shelley’s rewrite of Milton’s Paradise Lost | German fairy tales | German fairy tales | Scientific discovery tales | Scientific discovery tales | Frankenstein (1831) | Frankenstein (1831) | Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856) | Gothic novella in Benito Cereno (1856) | Alison Bechdel’s rewriting of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) | Alison Bechdel’s rewriting of The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) | Fun Home (2006). | Fun Home (2006).

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT) 21L.004 Reading Poetry (MIT)

Description

"Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion, "Reading Poetry" has several aims: primarily, to increase the ways you can become more engaged and curious readers of poetry; to increase your confidence as writers thinking about literary texts; and to provide you with the language for literary description. The course is not designed as a historical survey course but rather as an introductory approach to poetry from various directions – as public or private utterances; as arranged imaginative shapes; and as psychological worlds, for example. One perspective offered is that poetry offers intellectual, moral and linguistic pleasures as well as difficulties to our private lives as readers and to our public lives as writers. Expect to hear and read poems aloud and to memorize lines; the class format will be group discussion,

Subjects

Literature | Literature | poetry | poetry | poets | poets | English | English | Renaissance | Renaissance | modern | modern | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | sonnets | sonnets | stanza-form | stanza-form | figurative language | figurative language | metaphor | metaphor | metonymy | metonymy | meter | meter | accent | accent | duration | duration | apostrophe | apostrophe | assonance | assonance | enjambment | enjambment | chiasmus | chiasmus | hyperbole | hyperbole | litotes | litotes | Donne | Donne | metaphysical | metaphysical | literary art | literary art | language | language | aethetic | aethetic | meaning | meaning | poetic drama | poetic drama | hymns | hymns | lyrics | lyrics | history | history | rhetoric | rhetoric | song | song | drama | drama | comedy | comedy | verse | verse | form | form | rhyme | rhyme | prose | prose | musical | musical | ambiguity | ambiguity | symbolism | symbolism | world | world | irony | irony | style | style | stylistic | stylistic | poetic diction | poetic diction | simile | simile | connections | connections | cultures | cultures | genres | genres | elements of poetry | elements of poetry | lines | lines | stanzas | stanzas | English love sonnets | English love sonnets | sound | sound | figuration | figuration | literary tradition | literary tradition

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT) 21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

This is a course focused on the literary genre of the essay, that wide-ranging, elastic, and currently very popular form that attracts not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers, poets, scientists, physicians, and others to write in the form, and readers of every stripe to read it. Some say we are living in era in which the essay is enjoying a renaissance; certainly essays, both short and long, are at present easier to get published than are short stories or novels, and essays are featured regularly and prominently in the mainstream press (both magazines and newspapers) and on the New York Times bestseller books list. But the essay has a history, too, a long one, which goes back at least to the sixteenth-century French writer Montaigne, generally considered the progenitor of the This is a course focused on the literary genre of the essay, that wide-ranging, elastic, and currently very popular form that attracts not only nonfiction writers but also fiction writers, poets, scientists, physicians, and others to write in the form, and readers of every stripe to read it. Some say we are living in era in which the essay is enjoying a renaissance; certainly essays, both short and long, are at present easier to get published than are short stories or novels, and essays are featured regularly and prominently in the mainstream press (both magazines and newspapers) and on the New York Times bestseller books list. But the essay has a history, too, a long one, which goes back at least to the sixteenth-century French writer Montaigne, generally considered the progenitor of the

Subjects

Writing | Writing | reading | reading | essay | essay | iterary genre | iterary genre | nonfiction writers | nonfiction writers | fiction writers | fiction writers | poets | poets | scientists | scientists | physicians | physicians | Didion | Didion | Bacon | Bacon | White | White | E.B. | E.B. | Walker | Walker | Oates | Oates | Orwell | Orwell | Gould | Gould | Wolfe | Wolfe | Woolf | Woolf | Eiseley | Eiseley | White | E.B. | White | E.B.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

In this class, you will read, think about, and (I hope) enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today, if not the most popular: the novel. Some of the questions we will consider are: Why did so many novels appear in the eighteenth century? Why were they—and are they—called novels? Who wrote them? Who read them? Who narrates them? What are they likely to be about? Do they have distinctive characteristics? What is their relationship to the time and place in which they appeared? How have they changed over the years? And, most of all, why do we like to read them so much? In this class, you will read, think about, and (I hope) enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today, if not the most popular: the novel. Some of the questions we will consider are: Why did so many novels appear in the eighteenth century? Why were they—and are they—called novels? Who wrote them? Who read them? Who narrates them? What are they likely to be about? Do they have distinctive characteristics? What is their relationship to the time and place in which they appeared? How have they changed over the years? And, most of all, why do we like to read them so much?

Subjects

novel | novel | literary genre | literary genre | narrator | narrator | daniel defoe | daniel defoe | moll flanders | moll flanders | frances burney | frances burney | evelina | evelina | jane austen | jane austen | pride and prejudice | pride and prejudice | elizabeth gaskell | elizabeth gaskell | mary barton | mary barton | george eliot | george eliot | adam bede | adam bede | mary elizabeth braddon | mary elizabeth braddon | lady audley's secret | lady audley's secret | thomas hardy | thomas hardy | tess of the d'urbervilles | tess of the d'urbervilles | virginia woolf | virginia woolf | mrs. dalloway | mrs. dalloway | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT) 21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web. As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web.

Subjects

reading | reading | writing | writing | essay | essay | literary | literary | rhetorical | rhetorical | tradition | tradition | genre | genre | prose | prose | antiquity | antiquity | modern | modern | popular | popular | form | form | print | print | media | media | web | web | functions | functions | commentary | commentary | others | others | textual | textual | numerical | numerical | data | data | discovery | discovery | meaning | meaning | personal experience | personal experience | narration | narration | specialized | specialized | knowledge | knowledge | general | general | audience. | audience.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction and Drama (MIT) 21G.044 Traditional Chinese Literature: Poetry, Fiction and Drama (MIT)

Description

Introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works to be read include: Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Margin, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature to be read in translation. Conducted in English. Introduction to some of the major genres of traditional Chinese poetry, fiction, and drama. Intended to give students a basic understanding of the central features of traditional Chinese literary genres, as well as to introduce students to the classic works of the Chinese literary tradition. Works to be read include: Journey to the West, Outlaws of the Margin, Dream of the Red Chamber, and the poetry of the major Tang dynasty poets. Literature to be read in translation. Conducted in English.

Subjects

genre | genre | tradition | tradition | Chinese poetry | Chinese poetry | Chinese fiction | Chinese fiction | Chinese drama | Chinese drama | Journey to the West | Journey to the West | Outlaws of the Margin | Outlaws of the Margin | Dream of the Red Chamber | Dream of the Red Chamber | Tang dynasty poets | Tang dynasty poets

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.421 Comedy (MIT) 21L.421 Comedy (MIT)

Description

This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molière, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays. This course looks at comedy in drama, novels, and films from Classical Greece to the twentieth century. Focusing on examples from Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Molière, Wilde, Chaplin, and Billy Wilder, along with theoretical contexts, the class examines comedy as a transgressive mode with revolutionary social and political implications. This is a Communications Intensive (CI) class with emphasis on discussion, and frequent, short essays.

Subjects

humor | humor | drama | drama | narrative | narrative | genre | genre | literary history | literary history | irony | irony | comic | comic | slapstick | slapstick | satire | satire | wit | wit | trickster | trickster | allegory | allegory | transgression | transgression | social commentary | social commentary | political commentary | political commentary | William Shakespeare | William Shakespeare | Aristophanes | Aristophanes | Moliere | Moliere | Aphra Behn | Aphra Behn | Jane Austen | Jane Austen | Mark Twain | Mark Twain | Oscar Wilde | Oscar Wilde | Italo Calvino | Italo Calvino | Alison Bechdel | Alison Bechdel

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT) 21L.715 Media in Cultural Context (MIT)

Description

This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets. This course explores the international trade in television text, considering the ways in which 'foreign' programs find places within 'domestic' schedules. Looking at the life television texts maintain outside of their home market, this course examines questions of globalization and national cultures of production and reception. Students will be introduced to a range of positions about the nature of international textual trade, including economic arguments about the structuring of international markets and ethnographic studies about the role imported content plays in the formation of hybrid national identities. Students will be encouraged to consider the role American content is made to play in non-American markets.

Subjects

television | television | world markets | world markets | globalization | globalization | national cultures of production and reception | national cultures of production and reception | international cultural exchange | international cultural exchange | format trading | format trading | creativity of translation | creativity of translation | international circulation of light entertainment | international circulation of light entertainment | identity formation | identity formation | domestic content regulation strategies | domestic content regulation strategies | cultural imports | cultural imports | media imperialism | media imperialism | production industires | production industires | economics | economics | cultural translation | cultural translation | universal texts | universal texts | trade flows | trade flows | adaptation | adaptation | subtitling | subtitling | genre | genre | transparency | transparency | diasporic media | diasporic media | American culture | American culture | local reception | local reception | response | response

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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George Eliot 2. Genre and Justice

Description

The second lecture in the series on George Eliot considers how narrative justice operates in relation to the genres of comedy and tragedy, particularly in 'Adam Bede' and 'Daniel Deronda'. The lecture identifies the disproportionate amount of suffering experienced by the women in Eliot's fiction in comparison to the men; an issue which has long been a bone of contention for feminist critics. Dr Catherine Brown discusses Eliot's belief that one's happiness and contentment should always be qualified by the knowledge that, at any given moment, others are experiencing misery. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | adam bede | justice | George Eliot | daniel deronda | george elliot | genre | #greatwriters | literature | adam bede | justice | George Eliot | daniel deronda | george elliot | genre | #greatwriters | 2011-11-10

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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CMS.603 American Soap Operas (MIT) CMS.603 American Soap Operas (MIT)

Description

The television landscape has changed drastically in the past few years; nowhere is this more prevalent than in the American daytime serial drama, one of the oldest forms of television content. This class examines the history of these "soap operas" and their audiences by focusing on the production, consumption, and media texts of soaps. The class will include discussions of what makes soap operas a unique form, the history of the genre, current experimentation with transmedia storytelling, the online fan community, and comparisons between daytime dramas and primetime serials from 24 to Friday Night Lights, through a study of Procter & Gamble's As the World Turns. The television landscape has changed drastically in the past few years; nowhere is this more prevalent than in the American daytime serial drama, one of the oldest forms of television content. This class examines the history of these "soap operas" and their audiences by focusing on the production, consumption, and media texts of soaps. The class will include discussions of what makes soap operas a unique form, the history of the genre, current experimentation with transmedia storytelling, the online fan community, and comparisons between daytime dramas and primetime serials from 24 to Friday Night Lights, through a study of Procter & Gamble's As the World Turns.

Subjects

As the World Turns | As the World Turns | gender | gender | television | television | genre conventions | genre conventions | relationships | relationships | drama | drama | student work | student work | advertising | advertising | ratings | ratings | cliffhanger | cliffhanger | fandom | fandom | online interactions | online interactions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.420 Literary Studies: The Legacy of England (MIT) 21L.420 Literary Studies: The Legacy of England (MIT)

Description

Topic: The English sense of humor. This course examines English literature across genre and historical periods. It is designed for students who want to study English literature or writing in some depth, or to know more about English literary culture and history. Students will also learn about the relationships between literary themes, forms, and conventions and the times in which they were produced. Materials include: Medieval tales, riddles, and character sketches; Renaissance lyrics and a play, 18th-century satires in words and images, 19th century irony, modern stories and film. Topic: The English sense of humor. This course examines English literature across genre and historical periods. It is designed for students who want to study English literature or writing in some depth, or to know more about English literary culture and history. Students will also learn about the relationships between literary themes, forms, and conventions and the times in which they were produced. Materials include: Medieval tales, riddles, and character sketches; Renaissance lyrics and a play, 18th-century satires in words and images, 19th century irony, modern stories and film.

Subjects

English literature across genre and historical period | English literature across genre and historical period | writing | writing | relationships between literary themes | forms | and conventions | relationships between literary themes | forms | and conventions | Renaissance lyrics | Enlightenment satire | and modernist short stories | Renaissance lyrics | Enlightenment satire | and modernist short stories

License

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21L.706 Studies in Film (MIT) 21L.706 Studies in Film (MIT)

Description

This course investigates relationships between two media, film and literature, studying works linked across the two media by genre, topic, and style. It aims to sharpen appreciation of major works of cinema and of literary narrative. The course explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political and aesthetic boundaries. It includes some attention to theory of narrative. Films to be studied include works by Akira Kurosawa, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppolla, Clint Eastwood, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and Federico Fellini, among others. Literary works include texts by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Honoré de Balzac, Henry James and F. Scott Fitzgerald. This course investigates relationships between two media, film and literature, studying works linked across the two media by genre, topic, and style. It aims to sharpen appreciation of major works of cinema and of literary narrative. The course explores how artworks challenge and cross cultural, political and aesthetic boundaries. It includes some attention to theory of narrative. Films to be studied include works by Akira Kurosawa, John Ford, Francis Ford Coppolla, Clint Eastwood, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and Federico Fellini, among others. Literary works include texts by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Honoré de Balzac, Henry James and F. Scott Fitzgerald.

Subjects

Media | film | Media | film | literature | literature | genre | genre | topic | topic | style | style | cinema | cinema | literary narrative | literary narrative | cultural | cultural | political | political | aesthetic | aesthetic | boundaries | boundaries | theory of narrative | theory of narrative | Akira Kurosawa | Akira Kurosawa | John Ford | John Ford | Francis Ford Coppolla | Francis Ford Coppolla | Clint Eastwood | Clint Eastwood | Orson Welles | Orson Welles | Billy Wilder | Billy Wilder | Federico Fellini | Federico Fellini | Aeschylus | Aeschylus | Sophocles | Sophocles | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Cervantes | Cervantes | Honor? de Balzac | Honor? de Balzac | Henry James | Henry James | F. Scott Fitzgerald | F. Scott Fitzgerald

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.759 Writing Science Fiction (MIT)

Description

This class will focus on the craft of writing genre science fiction. Students write and read science fiction and analyze and discuss stories written for the class. For the first eight weeks, readings in contemporary science fiction accompany lectures and formal writing assignments intended to illuminate various aspects of writing craft as well as the particular problems of writing science fiction. The rest of the term is given to roundtable workshops on student's stories.

Subjects

writing | scifi | sci fi | science fiction | fantasy | fiction | literature | genre | workshop | speculative fiction | subgenre | world building | worldbuilding | protagonist | characters | future | theme | futurist | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT) 21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

Subjects

novel | novel | literary genre | literary genre | narrator | narrator | daniel defoe | daniel defoe | moll flanders | moll flanders | frances burney | frances burney | evelina | evelina | jane austen | jane austen | pride and prejudice | pride and prejudice | elizabeth gaskell | elizabeth gaskell | mary barton | mary barton | george eliot | george eliot | adam bede | adam bede | mary elizabeth braddon | mary elizabeth braddon | lady audley's secret | lady audley's secret | thomas hardy | thomas hardy | tess of the d'urbervilles | tess of the d'urbervilles | virginia woolf | virginia woolf | mrs. dalloway | mrs. dalloway | essay | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Old English Then and Now (slides)

Description

This final lecture looks briefly at how Old English has been reused by modern writers, but specifically at how the Anglo-Saxons have been portrayed on film, and what film studies can do to help us enjoy Old English poetry.

Subjects

old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | film | genre | #greatwriters | Q321 | Q310 | ukoer | old english | runes | middle earth | medieval | anglo-saxon | film | genre | #greatwriters | Q321 | Q310

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21G.067J Cultural Performances of Asia (MIT) 21G.067J Cultural Performances of Asia (MIT)

Description

This course examines cultural performances of Asia, including both traditional and contemporary forms, in a variety of genres. Students will explore the communicative power of performances with attention to the ways performers, media, cultural settings, and audiences interact. The representation of cultural difference is considered and how it is altered through processes of globalization. Performances are viewed live when possible, but the course also relies on video, audio, and online materials as necessary. There are no prerequisites for this course and it is taught in English. This course examines cultural performances of Asia, including both traditional and contemporary forms, in a variety of genres. Students will explore the communicative power of performances with attention to the ways performers, media, cultural settings, and audiences interact. The representation of cultural difference is considered and how it is altered through processes of globalization. Performances are viewed live when possible, but the course also relies on video, audio, and online materials as necessary. There are no prerequisites for this course and it is taught in English.

Subjects

21G.067 | 21G.067 | WGS.608 | WGS.608 | Cultural performances | Cultural performances | Asia | Asia | traditional | traditional | contemporary | contemporary | genres | genres | performers | performers | media | media | cultural settings | cultural settings | audiences | audiences | globalization | globalization | live | live | video | video | audio | audio | online | online | English | English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.735 Writing and Reading the Essay (MIT)

Description

As the course title suggests, this class is meant to acquaint you with the literary and rhetorical tradition of the essay, a genre which has been described by one scholar as "the meeting ground between art and philosophy," and by another as "the place where the self finds a pattern in the world, and the world finds a pattern in the self". Though the essay is part of a tradition of prose which stretches back to antiquity, it is also a thoroughly modern and popular form of writing, found in print media and on the web.

Subjects

reading | writing | essay | literary | rhetorical | tradition | genre | prose | antiquity | modern | popular | form | print | media | web | functions | commentary | others | textual | numerical | data | discovery | meaning | personal experience | narration | specialized | knowledge | general | audience.

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.471 Major English Novels (MIT)

Description

In this class you will read, think about, and hopefully enjoy important examples of what has become one of the most popular literary genres today (if not the most popular): the novel.Recommended CitationFor any use or distribution of these materials, please cite as follows:Ina Lipkowitz, course materials for 21L.471 Major English Novels, Spring 2007. MIT OpenCourseWare (http://ocw.mit.edu/), Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Downloaded on [DD Month YYYY].

Subjects

novel | literary genre | narrator | daniel defoe | moll flanders | frances burney | evelina | jane austen | pride and prejudice | elizabeth gaskell | mary barton | george eliot | adam bede | mary elizabeth braddon | lady audley's secret | thomas hardy | tess of the d'urbervilles | virginia woolf | mrs. dalloway | essay

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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