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A ghost disturbs Pete and Sian Allport after moving to Garreg Wen near Porthmadog, home of the harpist Dafydd y Garreg Wen (1556991)2 A ghost disturbs Pete and Sian Allport after moving to Garreg Wen near Porthmadog, home of the harpist Dafydd y Garreg Wen (1556991)2

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cymru | cymru | wales | wales | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | nationallibraryofwales | nationallibraryofwales | charlesgeoff19092002 | charlesgeoff19092002 | negyddffilm | negyddffilm | filmnegatives | filmnegatives | hauntedhouse | hauntedhouse | dafyddygarregwen | dafyddygarregwen | ghost | ghost | fright | fright | fear | fear | haunted | haunted

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A ghost disturbs Pete and Sian Allport after moving to Garreg Wen near Porthmadog, home of the harpist Dafydd y Garreg Wen (1556991)1 A ghost disturbs Pete and Sian Allport after moving to Garreg Wen near Porthmadog, home of the harpist Dafydd y Garreg Wen (1556991)1

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cymru | cymru | wales | wales | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | nationallibraryofwales | nationallibraryofwales | charlesgeoff19092002 | charlesgeoff19092002 | negyddffilm | negyddffilm | filmnegatives | filmnegatives | hauntedhouse | hauntedhouse | dafyddygarregwen | dafyddygarregwen | ghost | ghost | fright | fright | fear | fear | haunted | haunted

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A ghost disturbs Pete and Sian Allport after moving to Garreg Wen near Porthmadog, home of the harpist Dafydd y Garreg Wen (1556991) A ghost disturbs Pete and Sian Allport after moving to Garreg Wen near Porthmadog, home of the harpist Dafydd y Garreg Wen (1556991)

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Subjects

cymru | cymru | wales | wales | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | nationallibraryofwales | nationallibraryofwales | charlesgeoff19092002 | charlesgeoff19092002 | negyddffilm | negyddffilm | filmnegatives | filmnegatives | hauntedhouse | hauntedhouse | dafyddygarregwen | dafyddygarregwen | ghost | ghost | fright | fright | fear | fear | haunted | haunted

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W.B. Yeats and the Ghost Club

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Dr Tara Stubbs uses exciting new research findings to discuss the close links between Yeats's attendances at the Ghost Club during the 1910s-1920s, his (sometimes amusing) spiritualist experiments, and his poetic works. The London-based Ghost Club was an esoteric society with many high-profile members. My talk will use exciting new research findings to discuss the close links between Yeats's attendances at the Ghost Club during the 1910s-1920s, his (sometimes amusing) spiritualist experiments, and his poetic works. Dr Tara Stubbs is a University Lecturer in English Literature and Creative Writing. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

literature | yeats | creative writing | feature | openday | english | ghost club | literature | yeats | creative writing | feature | openday | english | ghost club

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips. This class explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. Provides a better understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Explores great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten. Readings will also include selections from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. Writing assignments will range from web-based projects to analytic essays. No previous experience in music is necessary. Projected guest lectures, musical performances, field trips.

Subjects

magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT) 21M.013J The Supernatural in Music, Literature and Culture (MIT)

Description

This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural. This course explores the relationship between music and the supernatural, focusing on the social history and context of supernatural beliefs as reflected in key literary and musical works from 1600 to the present. It provides an understanding of the place of ambiguity and the role of interpretation in culture, science and art. Great works of art by Shakespeare, Verdi, Goethe (in translation), Gounod, Henry James and Benjamin Britten are explored, as well as readings from the most recent scholarship on magic and the supernatural.

Subjects

21M.013 | 21M.013 | 21A.113 | 21A.113 | 21L.013 | 21L.013 | Macbeth | Macbeth | Dido and Aeneas | Dido and Aeneas | Faust | Faust | Liszt | Liszt | Berlioz | Berlioz | Murnau | Murnau | Turn of the Screw | Turn of the Screw | magic | magic | witches | witches | witchcraft | witchcraft | belief | belief | superstition | superstition | sorcery | sorcery | ghost | ghost | spirit | spirit | heaven | heaven | hell | hell | devil | devil | angel | angel | occult | occult | paranormal | paranormal | religion | religion | allegory | allegory | Bible | Bible | God | God | sin | sin | alchemy | alchemy | astrology | astrology | mystic | mystic | mysticism | mysticism | Europe | Europe | European history | European history | medieval | medieval | Renaissance | Renaissance | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Goethe | Goethe | Henry James | Henry James | 19th century America | 19th century America | metaphysics | metaphysics | pragmatism | pragmatism | death | death | afterlife | afterlife | soul | soul | phantom | phantom | myth | myth | spell | spell | wizard | wizard | wisdom | wisdom

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Mary Shelley - Journal of Sorrow

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Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. In the months immediately following Shelley's death Mary lived at Albaro on the outskirts of Genoa. Her only regular companions were her young son, Percy Florence, and the journal she began on 2 October 1822. To this 'Journal of Sorrow' she confided her innermost thoughts: 'White paper - wilt thou be my confident? I will trust thee fully, for none shall see what I write.' To be sure, Mary would not have shared the entries she wrote immediately after Shelley's death, in which her remorse and despair sometimes approached hysteria. But she left no instructions for the 'Journal of Sorrow' to be destroyed after her death, and was perhaps reconciled to the idea that this, and her other journals, would eventually be seen by other eyes. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Percy Bysshe Shelley | poetry | literature | s ghost | mary shelley | william godwin | s ghost | mary shelley | william godwin | 2010-10-18

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William Godwin- Letter to Mary Shelley

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Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. This is the letter Godwin wrote to Mary after hearing of Shelley's death. Initially he seems more sorry for himself than for his daughter, complaining of her failure to write to him, but he then talks hopefully of their reconciliation. He and Mary had not seen each other for nearly four years, and for some time Shelley had intercepted Godwin's letters to Mary because, he said, their dismal contents distressed her. Now Godwin anticipates the removal of the obstacles between himself and Mary: she was no longer married to a member of the landed gentry, 'one of the daughters of prosperity', and was back on the same social level as himself, 'an unfortunate old man and a beggar'; he will be able to help with her affairs, and perhaps act as her lawye Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Percy Bysshe Shelley | poetry | literature | s ghost | mary shelley | william godwin | s ghost | mary shelley | william godwin | 2010-10-18

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Percy Bysshe Shelley - Letter to Mary Shelley

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Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. 'Everybody is in despair and every thing in confusion' writes Shelley in his last letter to Mary. He was in Pisa to discuss a new journal, The Liberal, with Leigh Hunt and Lord Byron. Shelley had been delayed there by Hunt's personal situation (his wife Marianne had been told she did not have long to live) and by Byron's complicated affairs. He hints that Edward Williams might sail back to the Villa Magni ahead of him. Hurriedly concluding the letter, Shelley hopes that Mary was reconciled to staying at the Villa Magni, where he had never been happier, but where she had been ill and wretchedly depressed. In a PS he tells her that he has found the manuscript of his translation Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Percy Bysshe Shelley | s ghost | mary shelley | literature | poetry | s ghost | mary shelley | literature | poetry | 2010-10-18

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Percy Bysshe Shelley - Adonais. An Elegy on the Death of John Keats

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Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. This great elegy was prompted by the news of the death of John Keats in Rome, and by Shelley's belief that Keats's illness was caused by the hostile notices his work had been given in the Quarterly Review. Shelley had the poem printed in Pisa under his own supervision, thereby ensuring its speedy appearance and its textual accuracy. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Percy Bysshe Shelley | poetry | literature | s ghost | elegy | mary shelley | John Keats | s ghost | elegy | mary shelley | John Keats | 2010-10-18

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Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley worked on 'The Triumph of Life', a dark and visionary poem, while living at the Villa Magni. At the time of his death it was still in a very incomplete state but despite this it is generally considered one of his major poetic achievements. Life is envisioned as a remorseless triumphal procession: a chariot is driven blindly through a madly dancing crowd, taking with it 'a captive multitude ... all those who had grown old in power, Or misery'. 'The Triumph of Life' caused Shelley considerable trouble. Most of the manuscript is heavily revised, and the page shown here is his fourth attempt at the opening lines. He wrote in terza rima, an Italian verse form used by Dante in the Divine Comedy, and by Petrarch in his Trionfi (Triumphs). Bot Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Percy Bysshe Shelley | poetry | triumph of life | literature | s ghost | mary shelley | s ghost | mary shelley | 2010-10-18

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Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley presented this light-hearted poem, copied out in his best hand, with the guitar he gave to Jane Williams in 1822. Taking his cue, perhaps, from the Shakespearean Christian name of the guitar's maker, Ferdinando, he casts himself and the Williamses as characters from The Tempest: they are the lovers Miranda and Ferdinand, he is Ariel, the spirit of fire and air. The wood of the guitar is from a tree that 'Died in sleep, and felt no pain, To live in happier form again'. Only the most skilful hands can release the harmonies of nature preserved in the instrument, and 'It keeps its highest holiest tone / For our beloved Jane alone'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

with a guitar to jane | s ghost | poetry | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | s ghost | poetry | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | 2010-10-18

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Percy Bysshe Shelley - Fair copy of Ode to the West Wind

Description

Part of the Shelly's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley's best-known poem was written in Florence in late 1819. Technically it is a series of four sonnets written in 'terza rima', the verse-form Shelley would use again, with similar fluency, in his final poem, The Triumph of Life. The west wind is an agent of change: with seasonal rejuvenation comes a personal rebirth which will, in turn, inspire the 'unawakened Earth'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

s ghost | Ode to West Wind | poetry | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | s ghost | Ode to West Wind | poetry | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | 2010-10-18

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Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. 'Ozymandias' is the Greek name for Ramses II, who ruled Egypt for sixty-seven years from 1279 to 1213 BC. Ramses II was a military conqueror and a great builder, but Shelley's sonnet describes how the achievements of even the mightiest tyrants are obliterated by time. Only the Pharaoh's arrogant passions, as expressed in the ruined statue, have survived, outliving both the sculptor ('The hand that mocked them') and Ramses himself ('the heart that fed'). His many monuments have reverted to 'The lone and level sands'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Ozymandias | egypt | journal | s ghost | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | Ramses | history | s ghost | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | Ramses | history | 2010-10-18

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Mary Shelley (with Percy Bysshe Shelley) - Draft of Frankenstein

Description

Mary Shelley drafted Frankenstein in two tall notebooks. The first notebook was probably purchased in Geneva, the second several months later in England. They were later disbound, and now exist as single sheets. Shown here is an original opening from the Geneva notebook, containing Mary's draft of the turning-point in the novel: the moment when Frankenstein's Creature comes to life. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

frankenstein | journal | s ghost | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | history | s ghost | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | history | 2010-10-18

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Harriet Shelley - Letter to Eliza Westbrook, Shelley and her parents

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Harriet Shelley drowned herself in December 1816, aged twenty-one. Her body was recovered from the Serpentine on 10 December, and an inquest into the death of one 'Harriet Smith' was held the following day. Although her precise movements in the months leading up to her death are uncertain, it is clear that she was living away from home, that she had taken a lover, and that she was pregnant. This is Harriet's last letter. Muddled and full of self-recrimination, it reveals the nervous exhaustion and profound depression of her final days. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

harriet shelley | s ghost | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | journal | biography | history | s ghost | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | journal | biography | history | 2010-10-18

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Mary Shelley - Letter to Percy Bysshe Shelley

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley and Mary arrived back in London to face the almost universal disapproval of family and friends, and severe money problems. Shelley was now financially responsible for Mary and Claire as well as Harriet, who was heavily pregnant with their second child. Godwin refused to see him, but drew on his resources. Mary wrote this impassioned letter to Shelley when he was in hiding from his numerous creditors. They could meet only on Sundays, when it was illegal to make arrests for debt. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

journal | s ghost | biography | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | history | s ghost | biography | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | history

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Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley - Joint journal entry

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley and Mary eloped at 4.15 am on 28 July 1814, accompanied by Mary's step-sister Jane Clairmont. They were pursued by Mrs Godwin (Claire's mother), who caught up with them the following day at Calais, but failed to persuade them to return. On 2 August Shelley, Mary and Claire reached Paris, where they purchased this notebook. Shelley wrote up their dramatic flight from England, the stormy crossing (during which he began 'to reason upon death') and their arrival in France. Mary makes her first contribution to the journal by lightly completing a sentence: 'Mary was there. Shelley was also with me.' Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

journal | s ghost | biography | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | history | s ghost | biography | mary shelley. percy bysshe shelley | history | 2010-10-18

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Percy Bysshe Shelley: Letter to William Godwin

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Using false names, Shelley sent copies of The Necessity of the Atheism to 'men of thought and learning', including bishops and clergymen. Here, writing as 'Jennings Stukeley', he sends 'a tract' to William Godwin, expressing his hope that, if correct, it will 'festinate' the impact of Political Justice. This unusual word, meaning to hasten, is typical of the learned pose Shelley adopts. He makes no mention of his youth, and when sending a copy of The Necessity of Atheism to the Rector of Redmarshall he assumed the role of 'Charles Meyton', a well to do elderly clergyman. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

Percy Bysshe Shelley | bodleian | atheism | #greatwriters | s ghost | shelley | godwin | s ghost | shelley | godwin | 2010-10-18

License

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William Godwin: Memoirs of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Godwin's memoir of Mary Wollstonecraft has been called the first modern biography. At the time, however, its frankness and emotional candour provoked general outrage. Godwin did not hesitate to include the most painful and scandalous episodes in Mary's life: her brutal, drunken father; her affair with Gilbert Imlay and the birth of their illegitimate daughter, Fanny; her two suicide attempts; her unconventional religious faith; the ghastly details of her death. The poet Robert Southey joined the chorus of disapproval and condemned Godwin for 'stripping his dead wife naked'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

vindication of rights of women | bodleian | feminism | mary wollstonecraft | #greatwriters | s ghost | biography | shelley | godwin | s ghost | biography | shelley | godwin | 2010-10-18

License

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Mary Wollstonecraft Three notes to William Godwin

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Even after their marriage Godwin and Wollstonecraft preferred to live independently during the day, and communicate by correspondence. They regularly exchanged anything from long, carefully composed letters to short notes dashed off on scraps of paper. Shown here are Mary's last three notes to Godwin, written while she was waiting impatiently for the delivery of her child ('the animal'), and seeking reassurance from the midwife, Mrs Blenkinsop. In her final note, Mary Wollstonecraft half-quotes her mother's last words; 'Have a little patience, and all will be over'. Her own daughter, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin (later Mary Shelley), was born a few hours afterwards. It was a straightforward birth, but Mary Wollstonecraft soon contracted an infec Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

vindication of rights of women | bodleian | mary wollstonecraft | #greatwriters | s ghost | feminism | shelley | godwin | s ghost | feminism | shelley | godwin | 2010-10-18

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Mary Wollstonecraft - A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

Description

Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. In her most famous work Mary Wollstonecraft argued that if women were educated in the same way as men they would perform as well. And that society was wasting its assets by failing to educate them and to offer them the opportunity to work in the same areas as menMen are as much corrupted by being tyrants as women by being subject to them, she pointed out. Women should be trained for the professions and could run businesses and farms. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

vindication of rights of women | bodleian | gender | mary wollstonecraft | #greatwriters | s ghost | shelley | feminism | s ghost | shelley | feminism | 2010-10-18

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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A ghost disturbs Pete and Sian Allport after moving to Garreg Wen near Porthmadog, home of the harpist Dafydd y Garreg Wen (1556991)4 A ghost disturbs Pete and Sian Allport after moving to Garreg Wen near Porthmadog, home of the harpist Dafydd y Garreg Wen (1556991)4

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Subjects

cymru | cymru | wales | wales | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | nationallibraryofwales | nationallibraryofwales | charlesgeoff19092002 | charlesgeoff19092002 | negyddffilm | negyddffilm | filmnegatives | filmnegatives | ghost | ghost | porthmadog | porthmadog | dafyddygarregwen | dafyddygarregwen | hauntedhouse | hauntedhouse

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A ghost disturbs Pete and Sian Allport after moving to Garreg Wen near Porthmadog, home of the harpist Dafydd y Garreg Wen (1556991)3 A ghost disturbs Pete and Sian Allport after moving to Garreg Wen near Porthmadog, home of the harpist Dafydd y Garreg Wen (1556991)3

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cymru | cymru | wales | wales | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | llyfrgellgenedlaetholcymru | nationallibraryofwales | nationallibraryofwales | charlesgeoff19092002 | charlesgeoff19092002 | negyddffilm | negyddffilm | filmnegatives | filmnegatives | hauntedhouse | hauntedhouse | dafyddygarregwen | dafyddygarregwen | ghost | ghost | fright | fright | fear | fear | haunted | haunted

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A Psychic Apparition

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This mysterious collection of images have been discovered within the photographic collections of Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums. Reference: TWCMS -H13098-73-8 The lantern slides are from a series titled 'Psychic Photography From A New Angle' and feature eerie images of the supposedly paranormal and unknown forces caught on camera. Very little is known of the origins of this collection. The slides were designed to accompany a lecture by a Mr C.P. MacCarthy of 15 Wilkinson Street, Sheffield. Mr MacCarthy produced the images under test conditions in 1934 in front of an invited committee at 76 Clarkehouse Road, Sheffield. He states the intention was to ?demonstrate under test conditions Fake Psychic Photography? to this committee. Mr MacCarthy states his three reasons for this demonstration. 1.To prove the possibility of Fake under test conditions. 2.To show you cannot be too critical of such phenomena. 3.To indicate the increasing scope for fraud with the probability of genuine spirit photography. Mr MacCarthy further guarantees ?in the sum of five pounds, payable to any charitable institution, that no collusion exists, or has existed between myself and any other party in connection with this demonstration.? Little is currently known of the Psychic demonstration. Who sat on the invited committee? Who was Mr MacCarthy? Why was he investigating Psychic Photography? Can you help us with this information? (Copyright) We're happy for you to share these digital images within the spirit of The Commons. Please cite 'Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums' when reusing. Certain restrictions on high quality reproductions and commercial use of the original physical version apply though; if you're unsure please email archives@twmuseums.org.uk

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psychic | photography | paranormal | supernatural | fake | spirit | ghost | ectoplasm | spiritphotography | fraud | experiment | eerie | creepy | weird | odd | lanternslides | blackandwhite | mysterious | unusual | bizarre | anewangle | apparition | unknown | face | forces | captured | lecture | mrcpmaccarthy | testconditions | 1934 | invitedcommittee | 76clarkehouseroadsheffield | critical | genuine | payment | collusion | demonstration | investigation | surreal | scary | man | glasses | cleanshaven | image | reflection | stripes | shirt | tie | suit | coat | blazer | distracted | eyes | ears | nose | hair | mouth | lips | strand | line | blur | mark | blankwall | empty | space | dark | light | shining | makingeyecontact | blankexpression | forehead | wrinkles | grain | wash | surfaces

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Tyne & Wear Archives & Museums | FlickR

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