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Lecture 12: Knowing Your Players Lecture 12: Knowing Your Players

Description

Description: Today's reading analyzes user motivation along two axes: interest in the world vs. fellow players, gaining knowledge vs. proficiency. Students discuss the utility of this taxonomy, how games encourage these interactions, and come up with their own frames. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: strategy, competition, cooperation, feedback loop, playtesting, target audience, strategy, decision tree, randomness, roleplaying, achievements, worldbuilding, virtual economy, learning curve, determinism, griefing, game theoryTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Today's reading analyzes user motivation along two axes: interest in the world vs. fellow players, gaining knowledge vs. proficiency. Students discuss the utility of this taxonomy, how games encourage these interactions, and come up with their own frames. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: strategy, competition, cooperation, feedback loop, playtesting, target audience, strategy, decision tree, randomness, roleplaying, achievements, worldbuilding, virtual economy, learning curve, determinism, griefing, game theoryTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

strategy | strategy | competition | competition | cooperation | cooperation | feedback loop | feedback loop | playtesting | playtesting | target audience | target audience | decision tree | decision tree | randomness | randomness | roleplaying | roleplaying | achievements | achievements | worldbuilding | worldbuilding | virtual economy | virtual economy | learning curve | learning curve | determinism | determinism | griefing | griefing | game theory | game theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 33: Ethics in Games Lecture 33: Ethics in Games

Description

Description: Mia Consalvo asks students for examples illustrating how game designers construct ethical systems, how users act within those systems, and the role of community norms. How do players connect behavioral standards inside and outside the game world? Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Mia Consalvo (Comparative Media Studies)Keywords: ethical systems, violence, simulation, obscenity, morals, virtual economy, griefing, abstraction, censorship, geopolitics, community standards, social commentary, relativismTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA) Description: Mia Consalvo asks students for examples illustrating how game designers construct ethical systems, how users act within those systems, and the role of community norms. How do players connect behavioral standards inside and outside the game world? Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Mia Consalvo (Comparative Media Studies)Keywords: ethical systems, violence, simulation, obscenity, morals, virtual economy, griefing, abstraction, censorship, geopolitics, community standards, social commentary, relativismTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

ethical systems | ethical systems | violence | violence | simulation | simulation | obscenity | obscenity | morals | morals | virtual economy | virtual economy | griefing | griefing | abstraction | abstraction | censorship | censorship | geopolitics | geopolitics | community standards | community standards | social commentary | social commentary | relativism | relativism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT) CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | hacking | trolling | trolling | hacker | hacker | troll | troll | mass-murder | mass-murder | bully | bully | deviance | deviance | deviant | deviant | new media | new media | old media | old media | middle-aged media | middle-aged media | media | media | technology | technology | behavior | behavior | otaku | otaku | artifact | artifact | politics | politics | society | society | outsiders | outsiders | marihuana | marihuana | control | control | moral | moral | panic | panic | writing | writing | print | print | plato | plato | phaedrus | phaedrus | jowett | jowett | conciousness | conciousness | orality | orality | literacy | literacy | anxieties | anxieties | anxiety | anxiety | modernity | modernity | penny | penny | dreadful | dreadful | juvenile | juvenile | crime | crime | delinquency | delinquency | delinquent | delinquent | children | children | television | television | chip | chip | regulation | regulation | seduction | seduction | innocence | innocence | innocent | innocent | movies | movies | film | film | Marx | Marx | Engles | Engles | Jenkins | Jenkins | ruling | ruling | lass | lass | gender | gender | youth | youth | sex | sex | violence | violence | digital | digital | threat | threat | treat | treat | affect | affect | virus | virus | body | body | stupid | stupid | facebook | facebook | bookface | bookface | google | google | internet | internet | book | book | identity | identity | deception | deception | virtual | virtual | community | community | flesh | flesh | reddit | reddit | vigilante | vigilante | weirdness | weirdness | crackdown | crackdown | Sterling | Sterling | Doctorow | Doctorow | pornography | pornography | predator | predator | porn | porn | terror | terror | terrorism | terrorism | grief | grief | resistance | resistance | drama | drama | teen | teen | gossip | gossip | network | network | public | public | private | private | video | video | game | game | videogame | videogame | columbine | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | trolling | hacker | troll | mass-murder | bully | deviance | deviant | new media | old media | middle-aged media | media | technology | behavior | otaku | artifact | politics | society | outsiders | marihuana | control | moral | panic | writing | print | plato | phaedrus | jowett | conciousness | orality | literacy | anxieties | anxiety | modernity | penny | dreadful | juvenile | crime | delinquency | delinquent | children | television | chip | regulation | seduction | innocence | innocent | movies | film | Marx | Engles | Jenkins | ruling | lass | gender | youth | sex | violence | digital | threat | treat | affect | virus | body | stupid | facebook | bookface | google | internet | book | identity | deception | virtual | community | flesh | reddit | vigilante | weirdness | crackdown | Sterling | Doctorow | pornography | predator | porn | terror | terrorism | grief | resistance | drama | teen | gossip | network | public | private | video | game | videogame | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 12: Knowing Your Players

Description

Description: Today's reading analyzes user motivation along two axes: interest in the world vs. fellow players, gaining knowledge vs. proficiency. Students discuss the utility of this taxonomy, how games encourage these interactions, and come up with their own frames. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: strategy, competition, cooperation, feedback loop, playtesting, target audience, strategy, decision tree, randomness, roleplaying, achievements, worldbuilding, virtual economy, learning curve, determinism, griefing, game theoryTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

strategy | competition | cooperation | feedback loop | playtesting | target audience | decision tree | randomness | roleplaying | achievements | worldbuilding | virtual economy | learning curve | determinism | griefing | game theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies-writing/cms-608-game-design-fall-2010/audio-lectures/rss.xml

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Lecture 33: Ethics in Games

Description

Description: Mia Consalvo asks students for examples illustrating how game designers construct ethical systems, how users act within those systems, and the role of community norms. How do players connect behavioral standards inside and outside the game world? Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Mia Consalvo (Comparative Media Studies)Keywords: ethical systems, violence, simulation, obscenity, morals, virtual economy, griefing, abstraction, censorship, geopolitics, community standards, social commentary, relativismTranscript: PDFSubtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

ethical systems | violence | simulation | obscenity | morals | virtual economy | griefing | abstraction | censorship | geopolitics | community standards | social commentary | relativism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Lecture 12: Knowing Your Players

Description

Description: Today's reading analyzes user motivation along two axes: interest in the world vs. fellow players, gaining knowledge vs. proficiency. Students discuss the utility of this taxonomy, how games encourage these interactions, and come up with their own frames. Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason BegyKeywords: strategy, competition, cooperation, feedback loop, playtesting, target audience, strategy, decision tree, randomness, roleplaying, achievements, worldbuilding, virtual economy, learning curve, determinism, griefing, game theoryTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

strategy | competition | cooperation | feedback loop | playtesting | target audience | decision tree | randomness | roleplaying | achievements | worldbuilding | virtual economy | learning curve | determinism | griefing | game theory

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/comparative-media-studies/cms-608-game-design-fall-2010/audio-lectures/rss.xml

Attribution

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Lecture 33: Ethics in Games

Description

Description: Mia Consalvo asks students for examples illustrating how game designers construct ethical systems, how users act within those systems, and the role of community norms. How do players connect behavioral standards inside and outside the game world? Instructors/speakers: Philip Tan, Jason Begy, Mia Consalvo (Comparative Media Studies)Keywords: ethical systems, violence, simulation, obscenity, morals, virtual economy, griefing, abstraction, censorship, geopolitics, community standards, social commentary, relativismTranscript: PDF (English - US)Subtitles: SRTAudio - download: Internet Archive (MP3)Audio - download: iTunes U (MP3)(CC BY-NC-SA)

Subjects

ethical systems | violence | simulation | obscenity | morals | virtual economy | griefing | abstraction | censorship | geopolitics | community standards | social commentary | relativism

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

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CMS.S60 Technopanics: Moral Panics about Technology (MIT)

Description

Hacking and trolling; mass murders and bullying. What do these have in common? One theory holds that these are all "deviant" social behaviors, occurring both online and off, which have purportedly been brought about or exacerbated by our new media environment. Such aberrant behaviors seemingly give us ample reason to fear digital and social media. But is technology to blame? We will grapple with this question as we investigate how our understanding of new technologies and media is socially shaped and, in turn, how new media might influence our social behavior. We will begin by studying how similar panics about "old" media (books, film, television and even the written word itself) set historical precedents for these current fears. Along the way we will establish and exp

Subjects

hacking | trolling | hacker | troll | mass-murder | bully | deviance | deviant | new media | old media | middle-aged media | media | technology | behavior | otaku | artifact | politics | society | outsiders | marihuana | control | moral | panic | writing | print | plato | phaedrus | jowett | conciousness | orality | literacy | anxieties | anxiety | modernity | penny | dreadful | juvenile | crime | delinquency | delinquent | children | television | chip | regulation | seduction | innocence | innocent | movies | film | Marx | Engles | Jenkins | ruling | lass | gender | youth | sex | violence | digital | threat | treat | affect | virus | body | stupid | facebook | bookface | google | internet | book | identity | deception | virtual | community | flesh | reddit | vigilante | weirdness | crackdown | Sterling | Doctorow | pornography | predator | porn | terror | terrorism | grief | resistance | drama | teen | gossip | network | public | private | video | game | videogame | columbine

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Health and Social care - Death and medicine

Description

This resource asks the reader to consider the experience of grief and bereavement and in particular the extent to which grieving people need professional help. The unit considers the evidence for the effects of grief and the extent to which current ways of responding are helpful.

Subjects

grief | bereavement | counselling | professional help | coventry university | cele | dentistry | A000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Death and medicine: postponement and promise

Description

This unit asks the reader to consider the experience of grief and bereavement and in particular the extent to which grieving people need professional help. The unit considers the evidence for the effects of grief and the extent to which current ways of responding are helpful.

Subjects

health and lifestyle | bereavement | death | dying | grief | medicalisation | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The medicalised context of bereavement

Description

This unit helps you to explore the extent to which death and dying in western societies are medical events and what aspects of death and dying might be neglected as a consequence. The unit covers the way that such things as medicine provide the context of the experiences associated with the end of life.

Subjects

health and lifestyle | antidepressant | bereavement | counselling | grief | Education | X000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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