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7.341 Brightening up Life: Harnessing the Power of Fluorescence Imaging to Observe Biology in Action (MIT) 7.341 Brightening up Life: Harnessing the Power of Fluorescence Imaging to Observe Biology in Action (MIT)

Description

One summer in the 1960s a young Japanese researcher, with the help of a few high school students, chopped up ten thousand jellyfish. As a by-product of this harvest, they isolated a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Since then, GFP has triggered a revolution in our understanding of gene expression and signaling in live cells. In this seminar, we will examine how this small protein generates fluorescence, i.e. absorbs light of one wavelength and emits light of a longer wavelength. We will discuss how the color palette has been extended from green to blue, red and many other colors, based on protein engineering of GFP and the study of vividly colorful coral reefs. We will then investigate how these fluorescent proteins can be used to track the motion of DNA, RNA and protein in living cells, a One summer in the 1960s a young Japanese researcher, with the help of a few high school students, chopped up ten thousand jellyfish. As a by-product of this harvest, they isolated a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Since then, GFP has triggered a revolution in our understanding of gene expression and signaling in live cells. In this seminar, we will examine how this small protein generates fluorescence, i.e. absorbs light of one wavelength and emits light of a longer wavelength. We will discuss how the color palette has been extended from green to blue, red and many other colors, based on protein engineering of GFP and the study of vividly colorful coral reefs. We will then investigate how these fluorescent proteins can be used to track the motion of DNA, RNA and protein in living cells, a

Subjects

Green Fluorescent Protein | Green Fluorescent Protein | Fluorescent protein engineering | Fluorescent protein engineering | Photoconversion | Photoconversion | fluorescent protein variants | fluorescent protein variants | fluorescent microscopy facility | fluorescent microscopy facility | Quantitative fluorescent imaging | Quantitative fluorescent imaging | ultra-sensitive fluorescent imaging | ultra-sensitive fluorescent imaging | high-throughput analysis | high-throughput analysis | Fluorescent imaging in living organisms | Fluorescent imaging in living organisms | phycoerythrin | phycoerythrin | phytochrome | phytochrome | jellyfish | jellyfish | red fluorescent protein | red fluorescent protein | photoactivation | photoactivation | chromophore | chromophore | protonation | protonation | lysosomes | lysosomes | recombinant protein molecules | recombinant protein molecules

License

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Development of chemical probes

Description

Professor Stefan Knapp tells us how the development of chemical probes helps us to find new drugs. The role of proteins in cellular signalling and disease is best studied through the development of highly specific chemical inhibitors, which can serve as a tool molecule for functional studies. Professor Stefan Knapp works to determine the structure of protein molecules to understand their regulation and to aid the design of selective inhibitors that can be developed further into efficient drugs Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

drug discovery | high-throughput | cancer | drug discovery | high-throughput | cancer

License

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Membrane proteins and drug development

Description

Dr Liz Carpenter talks about her research on membrane proteins and drug development. Membrane proteins are the gateways to our cells - with nutrients, waste products, and even DNA and proteins entering and leaving cells via these tightly controlled proteins. Drugs often target membrane proteins; therefore, understanding their molecular structure helps us design better drugs. Dr Liz Carpenter uses X-ray crystallography to solve membrane protein structures. This information is then used to improve treatments for heart disease and neurological diseases. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

membrane proteins | protein structure | high-throughput | drug discovery | ion channel | x-ray crystallography | membrane proteins | protein structure | high-throughput | drug discovery | ion channel | x-ray crystallography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.342 Sweet Discoveries: Unraveling the Complex World of Sugars in Health and Disease (MIT) 7.342 Sweet Discoveries: Unraveling the Complex World of Sugars in Health and Disease (MIT)

Description

Glycans, which are complex assemblies of sugars, are the most prevalent class of macromolecules, surpassing nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Glycans are essential for life, as they are a required energy source, provide protection against cellular stresses and shape cellular structure. During this course, we will explore the many roles glycans play in human health and disease. For example, we will learn about the healthy glycosylation patterns of many mammalian proteins and the dynamic changes that glycan structures undergo during early development and cancer metastasis, the influence of dietary carbohydrates on glycan metabolism, and the role of densely glycosylated proteins involved in HIV infectivity. Concurrently, we will learn about the chemical and biological techniques used to det Glycans, which are complex assemblies of sugars, are the most prevalent class of macromolecules, surpassing nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Glycans are essential for life, as they are a required energy source, provide protection against cellular stresses and shape cellular structure. During this course, we will explore the many roles glycans play in human health and disease. For example, we will learn about the healthy glycosylation patterns of many mammalian proteins and the dynamic changes that glycan structures undergo during early development and cancer metastasis, the influence of dietary carbohydrates on glycan metabolism, and the role of densely glycosylated proteins involved in HIV infectivity. Concurrently, we will learn about the chemical and biological techniques used to det

Subjects

Glycans | Glycans | glycobiology | glycobiology | glycosylation patterns | glycosylation patterns | glycoproteins | glycoproteins | glycan metabolism | glycan metabolism | glycosylated proteins | glycosylated proteins | protein-glycan interactions | protein-glycan interactions | high-throughput glycan arrays | high-throughput glycan arrays | O-glycans | O-glycans | N-linked glycosylation | N-linked glycosylation | glycosyl-amino acids | glycosyl-amino acids | Metabolic glycan labeling | Metabolic glycan labeling | synthetic antigens | synthetic antigens

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 An RNA Safari: Exploring the Surprising Diversity of Mammalian Transcriptomes (MIT) 7.343 An RNA Safari: Exploring the Surprising Diversity of Mammalian Transcriptomes (MIT)

Description

The aim of this class is to introduce the exciting and often under appreciated discoveries in RNA biology by exploring the diversity of RNAs—encompassing classical molecules such as ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) as well as newer species, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), and circular RNAs (circRNAs). For each new class of RNA, we will evaluate the evidence for its existence as well as for its proposed function. Students will develop both a deep understanding of the field of RNA biology and the ability to critically assess new papers in this fast-paced field.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in The aim of this class is to introduce the exciting and often under appreciated discoveries in RNA biology by exploring the diversity of RNAs—encompassing classical molecules such as ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) as well as newer species, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), and circular RNAs (circRNAs). For each new class of RNA, we will evaluate the evidence for its existence as well as for its proposed function. Students will develop both a deep understanding of the field of RNA biology and the ability to critically assess new papers in this fast-paced field.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in

Subjects

RNA | RNA | ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) | ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) | transfer RNAs (tRNAs) | transfer RNAs (tRNAs) | messenger RNAs (mRNAs) | messenger RNAs (mRNAs) | microRNAs (miRNAs) | microRNAs (miRNAs) | long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) | long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) | circular RNAs (circRNAs) | circular RNAs (circRNAs) | high-throughput sequencing | high-throughput sequencing | snRNAs | snRNAs | pre-mRNA splicing | pre-mRNA splicing | snoRNAs | snoRNAs | regulatory molecules | regulatory molecules | siRNA | siRNA | piRNAs | piRNAs | CRISPR-associated RNAs | CRISPR-associated RNAs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.347 Epigenetic Regulation of Stem Cells (MIT) 7.347 Epigenetic Regulation of Stem Cells (MIT)

Description

During development a single totipotent cell gives rise to the vast array of cell types present in the adult human body, yet each cell has essentially the same DNA sequence. As cells differentiate, distinct sets of genes must be coordinately activated and repressed, ultimately leading to a cell-type specific pattern of gene expression and a particular cell fate. In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged in a complex protein super structure known as chromatin. Modification and reorganization of chromatin play a critical role in coordinating the cell-type specific gene expression programs that are required as a cell transitions from a pluripotent stem cell to a fully differentiated cell type. Epigenetics refers to such heritable changes that occur in chromatin without altering the primary DNA During development a single totipotent cell gives rise to the vast array of cell types present in the adult human body, yet each cell has essentially the same DNA sequence. As cells differentiate, distinct sets of genes must be coordinately activated and repressed, ultimately leading to a cell-type specific pattern of gene expression and a particular cell fate. In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged in a complex protein super structure known as chromatin. Modification and reorganization of chromatin play a critical role in coordinating the cell-type specific gene expression programs that are required as a cell transitions from a pluripotent stem cell to a fully differentiated cell type. Epigenetics refers to such heritable changes that occur in chromatin without altering the primary DNA

Subjects

Stem cells | Stem cells | induced pluripotency | induced pluripotency | Epigenetics | Epigenetics | chromatin | chromatin | histone | histone | epigenome | epigenome | genome-wide analyses | genome-wide analyses | high-throughput sequencing technologies | high-throughput sequencing technologies | Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing | Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing | ncRNAs | ncRNAs | epigenetic regulation | epigenetic regulation | DNA methylation | DNA methylation | post-translational modification of histones | post-translational modification of histones | roles of chromatin-assembly modifying complexes | roles of chromatin-assembly modifying complexes | non-coding RNAs | non-coding RNAs | nuclear organization | nuclear organization | developmental fate | developmental fate | stem cell therapy | stem cell therapy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Development of chemical probes

Description

Professor Stefan Knapp tells us how the development of chemical probes helps us to find new drugs. The role of proteins in cellular signalling and disease is best studied through the development of highly specific chemical inhibitors, which can serve as a tool molecule for functional studies. Professor Stefan Knapp works to determine the structure of protein molecules to understand their regulation and to aid the design of selective inhibitors that can be developed further into efficient drugs Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

drug discovery | high-throughput | cancer | drug discovery | high-throughput | cancer

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129165/video.xml

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Membrane proteins and drug development

Description

Dr Liz Carpenter talks about her research on membrane proteins and drug development. Membrane proteins are the gateways to our cells - with nutrients, waste products, and even DNA and proteins entering and leaving cells via these tightly controlled proteins. Drugs often target membrane proteins; therefore, understanding their molecular structure helps us design better drugs. Dr Liz Carpenter uses X-ray crystallography to solve membrane protein structures. This information is then used to improve treatments for heart disease and neurological diseases. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

membrane proteins | protein structure | high-throughput | drug discovery | ion channel | x-ray crystallography | membrane proteins | protein structure | high-throughput | drug discovery | ion channel | x-ray crystallography

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.343 Network Medicine: Using Systems Biology and Signaling Networks to Create Novel Cancer Therapeutics (MIT) 7.343 Network Medicine: Using Systems Biology and Signaling Networks to Create Novel Cancer Therapeutics (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will survey the primary systems biology literature, particularly as it pertains to understanding and treating various forms of cancer. We will consider various computational and experimental techniques being used in the field of systems biology, focusing on how systems principles have helped advance biological understanding. We will also discuss the application of the principles of systems biology and network biology to drug development, an emerging discipline called "network medicine." This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive sett In this course, we will survey the primary systems biology literature, particularly as it pertains to understanding and treating various forms of cancer. We will consider various computational and experimental techniques being used in the field of systems biology, focusing on how systems principles have helped advance biological understanding. We will also discuss the application of the principles of systems biology and network biology to drug development, an emerging discipline called "network medicine." This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive sett

Subjects

systems biology | systems biology | network medicine | network medicine | cancer | cancer | cancer therapeutics | cancer therapeutics | quantitative high-throughput data acquisition | quantitative high-throughput data acquisition | genomic analysis | genomic analysis | signaling network biology | signaling network biology | statistical/computational modeling | statistical/computational modeling | network biology | network biology | drug development | drug development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 An RNA Safari: Exploring the Surprising Diversity of Mammalian Transcriptomes (MIT)

Description

The aim of this class is to introduce the exciting and often under appreciated discoveries in RNA biology by exploring the diversity of RNAs—encompassing classical molecules such as ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) as well as newer species, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), and circular RNAs (circRNAs). For each new class of RNA, we will evaluate the evidence for its existence as well as for its proposed function. Students will develop both a deep understanding of the field of RNA biology and the ability to critically assess new papers in this fast-paced field.This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in

Subjects

RNA | ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) | transfer RNAs (tRNAs) | messenger RNAs (mRNAs) | microRNAs (miRNAs) | long-noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) | circular RNAs (circRNAs) | high-throughput sequencing | snRNAs | pre-mRNA splicing | snoRNAs | regulatory molecules | siRNA | piRNAs | CRISPR-associated RNAs

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.342 Sweet Discoveries: Unraveling the Complex World of Sugars in Health and Disease (MIT)

Description

Glycans, which are complex assemblies of sugars, are the most prevalent class of macromolecules, surpassing nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. Glycans are essential for life, as they are a required energy source, provide protection against cellular stresses and shape cellular structure. During this course, we will explore the many roles glycans play in human health and disease. For example, we will learn about the healthy glycosylation patterns of many mammalian proteins and the dynamic changes that glycan structures undergo during early development and cancer metastasis, the influence of dietary carbohydrates on glycan metabolism, and the role of densely glycosylated proteins involved in HIV infectivity. Concurrently, we will learn about the chemical and biological techniques used to det

Subjects

Glycans | glycobiology | glycosylation patterns | glycoproteins | glycan metabolism | glycosylated proteins | protein-glycan interactions | high-throughput glycan arrays | O-glycans | N-linked glycosylation | glycosyl-amino acids | Metabolic glycan labeling | synthetic antigens

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.347 Epigenetic Regulation of Stem Cells (MIT)

Description

During development a single totipotent cell gives rise to the vast array of cell types present in the adult human body, yet each cell has essentially the same DNA sequence. As cells differentiate, distinct sets of genes must be coordinately activated and repressed, ultimately leading to a cell-type specific pattern of gene expression and a particular cell fate. In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged in a complex protein super structure known as chromatin. Modification and reorganization of chromatin play a critical role in coordinating the cell-type specific gene expression programs that are required as a cell transitions from a pluripotent stem cell to a fully differentiated cell type. Epigenetics refers to such heritable changes that occur in chromatin without altering the primary DNA

Subjects

Stem cells | induced pluripotency | Epigenetics | chromatin | histone | epigenome | genome-wide analyses | high-throughput sequencing technologies | Chromatin Immunoprecipitation sequencing | ncRNAs | epigenetic regulation | DNA methylation | post-translational modification of histones | roles of chromatin-assembly modifying complexes | non-coding RNAs | nuclear organization | developmental fate | stem cell therapy

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.343 Network Medicine: Using Systems Biology and Signaling Networks to Create Novel Cancer Therapeutics (MIT)

Description

In this course, we will survey the primary systems biology literature, particularly as it pertains to understanding and treating various forms of cancer. We will consider various computational and experimental techniques being used in the field of systems biology, focusing on how systems principles have helped advance biological understanding. We will also discuss the application of the principles of systems biology and network biology to drug development, an emerging discipline called "network medicine." This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive sett

Subjects

systems biology | network medicine | cancer | cancer therapeutics | quantitative high-throughput data acquisition | genomic analysis | signaling network biology | statistical/computational modeling | network biology | drug development

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.341 Brightening up Life: Harnessing the Power of Fluorescence Imaging to Observe Biology in Action (MIT)

Description

One summer in the 1960s a young Japanese researcher, with the help of a few high school students, chopped up ten thousand jellyfish. As a by-product of this harvest, they isolated a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Since then, GFP has triggered a revolution in our understanding of gene expression and signaling in live cells. In this seminar, we will examine how this small protein generates fluorescence, i.e. absorbs light of one wavelength and emits light of a longer wavelength. We will discuss how the color palette has been extended from green to blue, red and many other colors, based on protein engineering of GFP and the study of vividly colorful coral reefs. We will then investigate how these fluorescent proteins can be used to track the motion of DNA, RNA and protein in living cells, a

Subjects

Green Fluorescent Protein | Fluorescent protein engineering | Photoconversion | fluorescent protein variants | fluorescent microscopy facility | Quantitative fluorescent imaging | ultra-sensitive fluorescent imaging | high-throughput analysis | Fluorescent imaging in living organisms | phycoerythrin | phytochrome | jellyfish | red fluorescent protein | photoactivation | chromophore | protonation | lysosomes | recombinant protein molecules

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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7.341 Brightening up Life: Harnessing the Power of Fluorescence Imaging to Observe Biology in Action (MIT)

Description

One summer in the 1960s a young Japanese researcher, with the help of a few high school students, chopped up ten thousand jellyfish. As a by-product of this harvest, they isolated a green fluorescent protein (GFP). Since then, GFP has triggered a revolution in our understanding of gene expression and signaling in live cells. In this seminar, we will examine how this small protein generates fluorescence, i.e. absorbs light of one wavelength and emits light of a longer wavelength. We will discuss how the color palette has been extended from green to blue, red and many other colors, based on protein engineering of GFP and the study of vividly colorful coral reefs. We will then investigate how these fluorescent proteins can be used to track the motion of DNA, RNA and protein in living cells, a

Subjects

Green Fluorescent Protein | Fluorescent protein engineering | Photoconversion | fluorescent protein variants | fluorescent microscopy facility | Quantitative fluorescent imaging | ultra-sensitive fluorescent imaging | high-throughput analysis | Fluorescent imaging in living organisms | phycoerythrin | phytochrome | jellyfish | red fluorescent protein | photoactivation | chromophore | protonation | lysosomes | recombinant protein molecules

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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