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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT) 21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert. This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | writing | science | science | technology | technology | communications | communications | medicine | medicine | public | public | public interest | public interest | science in the public interest | science in the public interest | education | education | literacy | literacy | science literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature | nature writing | nature writing | craft | craft | process | process | scientists | scientists | news | news | article | article | essay | essay | write | write | read | read | composition | composition | revise | revise | revision | revision | rewrite | rewrite | archive | archive | archival | archival | history | history | history of science | history of science | history of technology | history of technology | history of medicine | history of medicine | history of nature | history of nature | nature of history | nature of history | nature of technology | nature of technology | technological history | technological history | medical history | medical history | science of history | science of history | writing history | writing history | history of writing | history of writing | writing history of history of science | writing history of history of science | interview | interview | interviewing | interviewing | publish | publish | publishing | publishing | teaching writing | teaching writing | writing teaching | writing teaching | book | book | book review | book review | writing book review | writing book review | discussion | discussion | draft | draft | drafting | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history. This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework | agrarian history | agrarian history | historical demography | historical demography | European history | European history | American history | American history | Asian history | Asian history | maps | maps | African history | African history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies? This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies?

Subjects

history | history | methodology | methodology | historian | historian | analysis | analysis | oral history | oral history | comparative history | comparative history | memory | memory | narrative | narrative | language | language | sources | sources | methods | methods | organization | organization | framing | framing | and style | and style | historical writing | historical writing | political history | political history | social history | social history | cultural history | cultural history | demographics | demographics | biographical writing | biographical writing | biography | biography | auto-biography | auto-biography | historical films | historical films | fiction | fiction | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | approach | approach | style | style | evidence | evidence | methodologies | methodologies | historical accounts | historical accounts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches.

Subjects

history | history | theory | theory | method | method | contemporary | contemporary | twentieth century | twentieth century | social history | social history | economics | economics | primary source | primary source | narrative | narrative | analysis | analysis | cultural history | cultural history | 20th century | 20th century | Annales school | Annales school | agrarian history | agrarian history | class | class | race | race | gender | gender | historical categories | historical categories | historical demography | historical demography | new economic history | new economic history | military history | military history | environmental history | environmental history | film | film | Europe | Europe | America | America | Asia | Asia | primary sources | primary sources | 21H.991 | 21H.991 | STS.210 | STS.210

License

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | science in the public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature writing | craft | process | scientists | news | article | essay | write | read | composition | revise | revision | rewrite | archive | archival | history | history of science | history of technology | history of medicine | history of nature | nature of history | nature of technology | technological history | medical history | science of history | writing history | history of writing | writing history of history of science | interview | interviewing | publish | publishing | teaching writing | writing teaching | book | book review | writing book review | discussion | draft | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.035 Science Writing and New Media: Elements of Science Writing for the Public (MIT)

Description

This class is an introduction to writing about science–including nature, medicine, and technology–for general readers. In our reading and writing we explore the craft of making scientific concepts, and the work of scientists, accessible to the public through news articles and essays. The chief work of the class is students' writing. As part of our exploration of the craft of science writing, we will read essays and articles by writers such as David Quammen, Atul Gawande, Michael Pollan, and Elizabeth Kolbert.

Subjects

writing | science | technology | communications | medicine | public | public interest | science in the public interest | education | literacy | science literacy | scientific literacy | nature | nature writing | craft | process | scientists | news | article | essay | write | read | composition | revise | revision | rewrite | archive | archival | history | history of science | history of technology | history of medicine | history of nature | nature of history | nature of technology | technological history | medical history | science of history | writing history | history of writing | writing history of history of science | interview | interviewing | publish | publishing | teaching writing | writing teaching | book | book review | writing book review | discussion | draft | drafting

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT) STS.025J Making the Modern World: The Industrial Revolution in Global Perspective (MIT)

Description

This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper. This class is a global survey of the great transformation in history known as the "Industrial Revolution." Topics include origins of mechanized production, the factory system, steam propulsion, electrification, mass communications, mass production and automation. Emphasis on the transfer of technology and its many adaptations around the world. Countries treated include Great Britain, France, Germany, the US, Sweden, Russia, Japan, China, and India. Includes brief reflection papers and a final paper.

Subjects

STS.025 | STS.025 | 21H.913 | 21H.913 | world history | world history | British history | British history | European history | European history | Asian history | Asian history | South American history | South American history | American history | American history | 18th century | 18th century | 19th century | 19th century | 20th century | 20th century | transportation | transportation | warfare | warfare | capitalism | capitalism | electrification | electrification | factories | factories | mass communication | mass communication | industrialization | industrialization

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT) 21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches. We will doggedly ask two questions in this class: "What is history?" and "How do you do it in 2010?" In pursuit of the answers, we will survey a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the last several decades. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytical discussion of their topic, and the advantages and limitations of their approaches.

Subjects

primary sources | primary sources | women's studies | women's studies | gender history | gender history | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution | media studies | media studies | visual culture | visual culture | environmental history | environmental history | postmodernism | postmodernism | microhistory | microhistory | digital humanities | digital humanities | national history | national history | borders | borders | frontier | frontier | global history | global history | imperialism | imperialism | historiography | historiography | analytical framework | analytical framework

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT) 21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT)

Description

This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Milton and Ford. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. The primary theme of the class is to explore how England in the mid-seventeenth century became "a world turned upside down" by the new ideas and upheavals in religion, politics, and philosophy, ideas that would shape our modern world. Paying special

Subjects

history | history | art and science | art and science | art vs. science | art vs. science | history of science | history of science | religion | religion | natural philosophy | natural philosophy | mathematics | mathematics | literature | literature | church | church | cosmology | cosmology | physics | physics | philosphy | philosphy | astronomy | astronomy | alchemy | alchemy | chemistry | chemistry | plays | plays | theater history | theater history | cultural studies | cultural studies | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Ford | Ford | Tate | Tate | Behn | Behn | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | Burton | Burton | Hobbes | Hobbes | Boyle | Boyle | 17th century | 17th century | England | England | Scotland | Scotland | english history | english history | scottish history | scottish history | Britain | Britain | Charles I | Charles I | Charles II | Charles II | Cromwell | Cromwell | Jacobean era | Jacobean era | Caroline era | Caroline era | English Restoration | English Restoration | House of Stuart | House of Stuart | English Civil War | English Civil War | Early Modern English | Early Modern English

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991 Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

This subject examines some of the many ways that contemporary historians interpret the past, as well as the multiple types of sources on which they rely for evidence. It is by no means an exhaustive survey, but the topics and readings have been chosen to give a sense of the diversity of work that is encompassed in the discipline of history.

Subjects

primary sources | gender history | Industrial Revolution | media studies | visual culture | environmental history | postmodernism | microhistory | digital humanities | national history | borders | frontier | global history | imperialism | historiography | analytical framework | agrarian history | historical demography | European history | American history | Asian history | maps | African history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe from the 17th to the Early 19th Centuries (MIT) 21H.433 The Age of Reason: Europe from the 17th to the Early 19th Centuries (MIT)

Description

This course asks students to consider the ways in which social theorists, institutional reformers, and political revolutionaries in the 17th through 19th centuries seized upon insights developed in the natural sciences and mathematics to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Students study trials, art, literature and music to understand developments in Europe and its colonies in these two centuries. Covers works by Newton, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Marx, and Darwin. This course asks students to consider the ways in which social theorists, institutional reformers, and political revolutionaries in the 17th through 19th centuries seized upon insights developed in the natural sciences and mathematics to change themselves and the society in which they lived. Students study trials, art, literature and music to understand developments in Europe and its colonies in these two centuries. Covers works by Newton, Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Marx, and Darwin.

Subjects

history | history | history of intellectualism | history of intellectualism | reason | reason | enlightenment | enlightenment | french revolution | french revolution | history of science | history of science | isaac newton | isaac newton | decartes | decartes | art history | art history

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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4.696 A Global History of Architecture Writing Seminar (MIT) 4.696 A Global History of Architecture Writing Seminar (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course will study the question of Global Architecture from the point of view of producing a set of lectures on that subject. The course will be run in the form of a writing seminar, except that students will be asked to prepare for the final class an hour-long lecture for an undergraduate survey course. During the semester, students will study the debates about where to locate "the global" and do some comparative analysis of various textbooks. The topic of the final lecture will be worked on during the semester. For that lecture, students will be asked to identify the themes of the survey course, and hand in the bibliography and reading list for their lecture. Includes audio/video content: AV special element video. This course will study the question of Global Architecture from the point of view of producing a set of lectures on that subject. The course will be run in the form of a writing seminar, except that students will be asked to prepare for the final class an hour-long lecture for an undergraduate survey course. During the semester, students will study the debates about where to locate "the global" and do some comparative analysis of various textbooks. The topic of the final lecture will be worked on during the semester. For that lecture, students will be asked to identify the themes of the survey course, and hand in the bibliography and reading list for their lecture.

Subjects

global architectures | global architectures | survey course | survey course | the global | the global | comparative analysis | comparative analysis | researching history | researching history | global perspective | global perspective | architectural history | architectural history | comparative globality | comparative globality | art history | art history | eurocentrism | eurocentrism | ethnocentrism | ethnocentrism | mark kurlansky | mark kurlansky | salt a world history | salt a world history | jared diamond | jared diamond | collapse | collapse | how societies choose to fail or succeed | how societies choose to fail or succeed

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT) CMS.801 Media in Transition (MIT)

Description

This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods. This course centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were radically transformed. It includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of modern mass media, and the "digital revolution," among other case studies of media transformation and cultural change. Readings cover cultural and social history and historiographic methods.

Subjects

Media | Media | mass media | mass media | history | history | Gutenberg | Gutenberg | cultural change | cultural change | cultural history | cultural history | social history | social history | historiographic method | historiographic method | books | books | medieval history | medieval history | codex book | codex book | writing | writing | printing | printing | printing press | printing press | stage | stage | theater | theater | renaissance | renaissance | romanticism | romanticism | modernity | modernity | inventions | inventions | photography | photography | nineteenth century | nineteenth century | image | image | telegraph | telegraph | electrification | electrification | communication | communication | Morse | Morse | Daguerreotype | Daguerreotype | Fox Talbot | Fox Talbot | phonograph | phonograph | sound recording | sound recording | radio | radio | broadcasting | broadcasting | film | film | video | video | cinema | cinema | publishing | publishing

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT) STS.003 The Rise of Modern Science (MIT)

Description

This subject introduces the history of science from antiquity to the present. Students consider the impact of philosophy, art, magic, social structure, and folk knowledge on the development of what has come to be called "science" in the Western tradition, including those fields today designated as physics, biology, chemistry, medicine, astronomy and the mind sciences. Topics include concepts of matter, nature, motion, body, heavens, and mind as these have been shaped over the course of history. Students read original works by Aristotle, Vesalius, Newton, Lavoisier, Darwin, Freud, and Einstein, among others. This subject introduces the history of science from antiquity to the present. Students consider the impact of philosophy, art, magic, social structure, and folk knowledge on the development of what has come to be called "science" in the Western tradition, including those fields today designated as physics, biology, chemistry, medicine, astronomy and the mind sciences. Topics include concepts of matter, nature, motion, body, heavens, and mind as these have been shaped over the course of history. Students read original works by Aristotle, Vesalius, Newton, Lavoisier, Darwin, Freud, and Einstein, among others.

Subjects

history of science | history of science | philosophy | philosophy | ancient history | ancient history | medieval history | medieval history | industrial revolution | industrial revolution | natural history | natural history | cosmology | cosmology | psychology | psychology | relativity | relativity

License

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STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT) STS.464 Technology and the Literary Imagination (MIT)

Description

Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology, Our linked subjects are (1) the historical process by which the meaning of technology has been constructed, and (2) the concurrent transformation of the environment. To explain the emergence of technology as a pivotal word (and concept) in contemporary public discourse, we will examine responses — chiefly political and literary — to the development of the mechanic arts, and to the linked social, cultural, and ecological transformation of 19th- and 20th-century American society, culture, and landscape. Note: In the interests of freshness and topicality we regard the STS.464 syllabus as sufficiently flexible to permit some — mostly minor — variations from year to year. One example of a different STS.464 syllabus can be found in STS.464 Cultural History of Technology,

Subjects

history | history | technology | technology | science | science | techne | techne | industry | industry | intellectual history | intellectual history | cultural history | cultural history | management | management | engineering | engineering | industrial arts | industrial arts | mechanism | mechanism | mechanical arts | mechanical arts | technological determinism | technological determinism | manufacturing | manufacturing | manufactures | manufactures | factory | factory | capitalism | capitalism | entrepreneurship | entrepreneurship | innovation | innovation | ecology | ecology | environmentalism | environmentalism | pollution | pollution | literature | literature | American history | American history | the Enlightenment | the Enlightenment | industrialization | industrialization | Industrial Revolution | Industrial Revolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT) 21L.016 Learning from the Past: Drama, Science, Performance (MIT)

Description

This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Moliere. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing. This class explores the creation (and creativity) of the modern scientific and cultural world through study of western Europe in the 17th century, the age of Descartes and Newton, Shakespeare, Rembrandt and Moliere. It compares period thinking to present-day debates about the scientific method, art, religion, and society. This team-taught, interdisciplinary subject draws on a wide range of literary, dramatic, historical, and scientific texts and images, and involves theatrical experimentation as well as reading, writing, researching and conversing.

Subjects

history | history | art and science | art and science | art vs. science | art vs. science | history of science | history of science | religion | religion | natural philosophy | natural philosophy | mathematics | mathematics | literature | literature | cosmology | cosmology | physics | physics | astronomy | astronomy | alchemy | alchemy | chemistry | chemistry | plays | plays | theater history | theater history | cultural studies | cultural studies | Shakespeare | Shakespeare | Ford | Ford | Tate | Tate | Behn | Behn | Francis Bacon | Francis Bacon | Burton | Burton | Hobbes | Hobbes | Boyle | Boyle | 17th century | 17th century | England | England | english history | english history | Charles I | Charles I | Charles II | Charles II | Cromwell | Cromwell

License

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STS.050 The History of MIT (MIT) STS.050 The History of MIT (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course examines the history of MIT through the lens of the broader history of science and technology, and vice versa. The course covers the founding of MIT in 1861 and goes through the present, including such topics as William Barton Rogers, educational philosophy, biographies of MIT students and professors, intellectual and organizational development, the role of science, changing laboratories and practices, and MIT's relationship with Boston, the federal government, and industry. Assignments include short papers, presentations, and final paper. A number of classes are concurrent with the MIT150 Symposia. Includes audio/video content: AV lectures. This course examines the history of MIT through the lens of the broader history of science and technology, and vice versa. The course covers the founding of MIT in 1861 and goes through the present, including such topics as William Barton Rogers, educational philosophy, biographies of MIT students and professors, intellectual and organizational development, the role of science, changing laboratories and practices, and MIT's relationship with Boston, the federal government, and industry. Assignments include short papers, presentations, and final paper. A number of classes are concurrent with the MIT150 Symposia.

Subjects

history of mit | history of mit | history of technology | history of technology | history of higher education | history of higher education | history | history | MIT | MIT | boston | boston | cambridge | cambridge | mit 150 | mit 150

License

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This course is designed to introduce students to fundamental issues and debates in the writing of history. It will feature innovative historical accounts written in recent years. The class will consider such questions as the words historians use, their language, sources, methods, organization, framing, and style. How does the choice of each of these affect the historian's work? How does the author choose, analyze, and present evidence? How effective are different methodologies?

Subjects

history | methodology | historian | analysis | oral history | comparative history | memory | narrative | language | sources | methods | organization | framing | and style | historical writing | political history | social history | cultural history | demographics | biographical writing | biography | auto-biography | historical films | fiction | memoirs | conventional history | approach | style | evidence | methodologies | historical accounts

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.991J Theories and Methods in the Study of History (MIT)

Description

The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of approaches to the past used by historians writing in the twentieth century. Most of the books on the list constitute, in my view (and others), modern classics, or potential classics, in social and economic history. We will examine how these historians conceive of their object of study, how they use primary sources as a basis for their accounts, how they structure the narrative and analytic discussion of their topic, and what are the advantages and drawbacks of their approaches.

Subjects

history | theory | method | contemporary | twentieth century | social history | economics | primary source | narrative | analysis | cultural history | 20th century | Annales school | agrarian history | class | race | gender | historical categories | historical demography | new economic history | military history | environmental history | film | Europe | America | Asia | primary sources | 21H.991 | STS.210

License

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SP.341 History and Philosophy of Mechanics: Newton's Principia Mathematica (MIT) SP.341 History and Philosophy of Mechanics: Newton's Principia Mathematica (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on an in-depth reading of Principia Mathematica Philosophiae Naturalis by Isaac Newton, as well as several related commentaries and historical philosophical texts. This course focuses on an in-depth reading of Principia Mathematica Philosophiae Naturalis by Isaac Newton, as well as several related commentaries and historical philosophical texts.

Subjects

intellectual history | intellectual history | history of mathematics | history of mathematics | history of science and technology | history of science and technology | Isaac Newton | Isaac Newton | calculus | calculus | laws of motion | laws of motion

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.346 France, 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT) 21H.346 France, 1660-1815: Enlightenment, Revolution, Napoleon (MIT)

Description

This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon. This course covers French politics, culture, and society from Louis XIV to Napoleon Bonaparte. Attention is given to the growth of the central state, the beginnings of a modern consumer society, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, including its origins, and the rise and fall of Napoleon.

Subjects

French Revolution | French Revolution | history | history | french history | french history | european history | european history | napolean boneparte | napolean boneparte | Louis XVI | Louis XVI | the rights of man | the rights of man | Molière | Molière | Voltaire | Voltaire

License

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Japan in war and peace

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Autumn Semester 2009/2010 This module consists of a detailed examination of the critical period in Japanese history from the end of the Pacific War through the U.S. Occupation between 1945 and 1952 and recovery in the 1960s and beyond. The lectures and seminars examine the following topics: Japan’s Road to War The Japanese experience of war and defeat The A-bomb in history and memory The ‘Allied’ Occupation of Japan The changing Japanese family Japan’s economic recovery in the 1950s and 60s The environmental costs of rapid economic development The Asia-Pacific War in Japanese memory and popular culture Suitable for: Undergraduate year one students Dr Susan C. Townsend, School of History. D

Subjects

ukoer | japanese history | social history | war-time occupation | war and peace | the greate east asia co-prosperity sphere | military history | modern history 1920-1949 | modern history 1950-1999 | economic history | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT) 21H.931 Seminar in Historical Methods (MIT)

Description

This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century. This subject is designed to give 21H majors and minors an introduction to the methods that historians use to interpret the past. We will focus on two areas: archives and interpretation. In our work on archives, we will ask what constitutes an archive. We will visit one or two local archives, speak with archivists, and assemble our own archive related to life at MIT in 2003. Once we have a better understanding of the possibilities and limitations of historical archives, we will turn to the task of interpreting archival findings. We will discuss a series of readings organized around the theme of history and national identity in various parts of the world since the end of the eighteenth century.

Subjects

historical writing | historical writing | politics | politics | social | social | culture | culture | demographics | demographics | biography | biography | environment | environment | comparative literature | comparative literature | film | film | fiction | fiction | memoir | memoir | methodology | methodology | political | political | cultural | cultural | demographic | demographic | biographical | biographical | comparative | comparative | historical films | historical films | memoirs | memoirs | conventional history | conventional history | methods | methods | historians | historians | interpretation | interpretation | archives | archives | archivists | archivists | archival findings | archival findings | history | history | national identity | national identity | philosophy of history | philosophy of history

License

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STS.462 Social and Political Implications of Technology (MIT) STS.462 Social and Political Implications of Technology (MIT)

Description

This course is a graduate reading seminar, in which historical and contemporary studies are used to explore the interaction of technology with social and political values. Emphasis is on how technological devices, structures, and systems influence the organization of society and the behavior of its members. Examples are drawn from the technologies of war, transportation, communication, production, and reproduction. This course is a graduate reading seminar, in which historical and contemporary studies are used to explore the interaction of technology with social and political values. Emphasis is on how technological devices, structures, and systems influence the organization of society and the behavior of its members. Examples are drawn from the technologies of war, transportation, communication, production, and reproduction.

Subjects

Design | Design | planning | planning | history | history | American history | American history | electrification | electrification | aviation | aviation | Taylorism | Taylorism | war | war | military history | military history | fire prevention | fire prevention | risk | risk | development | development | business | business | civilization | civilization

License

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8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT) 8.282J Introduction to Astronomy (MIT)

Description

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models. Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the physics of the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

Subjects

solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system; stars; interstellar medium; the Galaxy; the Universe; planets; planet formation; star formation; stellar evolution; supernovae; compact objects; white dwarfs; neutron stars; black holes; plusars | binary X-ray sources; star clusters; globular and open clusters; interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays; distance ladder; | solar system | solar system | stars | stars | interstellar medium | interstellar medium | the Galaxy | the Galaxy | the Universe | the Universe | planets | planets | planet formation | planet formation | star formation | star formation | stellar evolution | stellar evolution | supernovae | supernovae | compact objects | compact objects | white dwarfs | white dwarfs | neutron stars | neutron stars | black holes | black holes | plusars | binary X-ray sources | plusars | binary X-ray sources | star clusters | star clusters | globular and open clusters | globular and open clusters | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | interstellar medium | gas | dust | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | distance ladder | distance ladder | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | jets | gravitational lensing | gravitational lensing | large scaling structure | large scaling structure | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | cosmic microwave background radiation | cosmic microwave background radiation | big-bang nucleosynthesis | big-bang nucleosynthesis | pulsars | pulsars | binary X-ray sources | binary X-ray sources | gas | gas | dust | dust | magnetic fields | magnetic fields | cosmic rays | cosmic rays | galaxy | galaxy | universe | universe | astrophysics | astrophysics | Sun | Sun | supernova | supernova | globular clusters | globular clusters | open clusters | open clusters | jets | jets | Newtonian cosmology | Newtonian cosmology | dynamical expansion | dynamical expansion | thermal history | thermal history | normal galaxies | normal galaxies | active galaxies | active galaxies | Greek astronomy | Greek astronomy | physics | physics | Copernicus | Copernicus | Tycho | Tycho | Kepler | Kepler | Galileo | Galileo | classical mechanics | classical mechanics | circular orbits | circular orbits | full kepler orbit problem | full kepler orbit problem | electromagnetic radiation | electromagnetic radiation | matter | matter | telescopes | telescopes | detectors | detectors | 8.282 | 8.282 | 12.402 | 12.402 | plusars | plusars | galaxies | galaxies | normal and active galaxies | normal and active galaxies | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe | dynamical expansion and thermal history of the Universe

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