Searching for hobbes : 29 results found | RSS Feed for this search

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7.1 Free Will, Determinism and Choice

Description

Part 7.1. Explores the problem of free will and the ideas of moral responsibility, determinism and choice; the need for a concept of freedom to allow free choice, the problems associated with this and asking whether we really have freedom of choice. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

freedom | philosophy | hobbes | free will | determinism | frankfurt | hume | freedom | philosophy | hobbes | free will | determinism | frankfurt | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.2 Different Concepts of Freedom

Description

Part 7.2. Looks at Hobbes' and Hume's views of free will and the three concepts of freedom, and considers the idea of moral responsibility as dependent on free will. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

moral responsibility | libertarianism | philosophy | choice | compatibalism | hobbes | free will | ethics | freedom determinism | hume | moral responsibility | libertarianism | philosophy | choice | compatibalism | hobbes | free will | ethics | freedom determinism | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2.2 Thomas Hobbes: The Monster of Malmesbury

Description

Part 2.2. A brief introduction to Thomas Hobbes, 'The Monster of Malmsbury', his views on a mechanistic universe, his strong ideas on determinism and his pessimistic view of human nature: 'The life of man is solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

causation | philosophy | civil war | leviathan | hobbes | materialism | causation | philosophy | civil war | leviathan | hobbes | materialism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.1 Free Will, Determinism and Choice

Description

Part 7.1. Explores the problem of free will and the ideas of moral responsibility, determinism and choice; the need for a concept of freedom to allow free choice, the problems associated with this and asking whether we really have freedom of choice. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

freedom | philosophy | hobbes | free will | determinism | frankfurt | hume | freedom | philosophy | hobbes | free will | determinism | frankfurt | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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http://mediapub.it.ox.ac.uk/feeds/129131/video.xml

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7.2 Different Concepts of Freedom

Description

Part 7.2. Looks at Hobbes' and Hume's views of free will and the three concepts of freedom, and considers the idea of moral responsibility as dependent on free will. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

moral responsibility | libertarianism | philosophy | choice | compatibalism | hobbes | free will | ethics | freedom determinism | hume | moral responsibility | libertarianism | philosophy | choice | compatibalism | hobbes | free will | ethics | freedom determinism | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The Idea of the State: a Genealogy

Description

Quentin Skinner gives a genealogy of the modern state, arguing that we should not understand the state simply as the government, but rather as a fictional person, enabling us to explain such things as shared responsibility for debt over generations. Quentin Skinner is the Barber Beaumont Professor of the Humanities at Queen Mary, University of London and he is the previous Regius professor of modern history at Cambridge. His most recent book is Hobbes and Republican Liberty (2008). Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

government | philosophy | liberty | state | hobbes | politics | debt | crisis | government | philosophy | liberty | state | hobbes | politics | debt | crisis | 2010-04-29

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.2 Thomas Hobbes: The Monster of Malmesbury

Description

Part 2.2. A brief introduction to Thomas Hobbes, 'The Monster of Malmsbury', his views on a mechanistic universe, his strong ideas on determinism and his pessimistic view of human nature: 'The life of man is solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short'.

Subjects

causation | philosophy | civil war | leviathan | hobbes | materialism | causation | philosophy | civil war | leviathan | hobbes | materialism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the history and historiography of science from ancient Greece to the present. It is designed to serve as an introduction for those who have no prior background in the field and to deepen the knowledge of those who already do. We will consider how the history of science has responded to its encounters with philosophy, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Our readings and discussions will focus on determining what makes particular works effective, understanding major contemporary trends and debates in the history of science, and establishing resources for further research. This course offers an introduction to the history and historiography of science from ancient Greece to the present. It is designed to serve as an introduction for those who have no prior background in the field and to deepen the knowledge of those who already do. We will consider how the history of science has responded to its encounters with philosophy, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Our readings and discussions will focus on determining what makes particular works effective, understanding major contemporary trends and debates in the history of science, and establishing resources for further research.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.450 Literature and Ethical Values (MIT) 21L.450 Literature and Ethical Values (MIT)

Description

The aim of this subject is to acquaint the student with some important works of systematic ethical philosophy and to bring to bear the viewpoint of those works on the study of classic works of literature. This subject will trace the history of ethical speculation in systematic philosophy by identifying four major positions: two from the ancient world and the two most important traditions of ethical philosophy since the renaissance. The two ancient positions will be represented by Plato and Aristotle, the two modern positions by Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. We will try to understand these four positions as engaged in a rivalry with one another, and we will also engage with the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes, which offers a bridge between ancient and modern conceptions and provides The aim of this subject is to acquaint the student with some important works of systematic ethical philosophy and to bring to bear the viewpoint of those works on the study of classic works of literature. This subject will trace the history of ethical speculation in systematic philosophy by identifying four major positions: two from the ancient world and the two most important traditions of ethical philosophy since the renaissance. The two ancient positions will be represented by Plato and Aristotle, the two modern positions by Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. We will try to understand these four positions as engaged in a rivalry with one another, and we will also engage with the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes, which offers a bridge between ancient and modern conceptions and provides

Subjects

ethics | ethics | values | values | literature | literature | morality | morality | justice | justice | virtue | virtue | literary theory | literary theory | responsibility | responsibility | politics | politics | plato | plato | aristotle | aristotle | machiavelli | machiavelli | hobbes | hobbes | sophocles | sophocles | euripides | euripides | shapkespeare | shapkespeare | swift | swift | ibsen | ibsen | shaw | shaw | dostoyevsky | dostoyevsky | conrad | conrad | bible | bible

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT) STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science. This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | history | science | science | darwin | darwin | galileo | galileo | goethe | goethe | mesmer | mesmer | boyle | boyle | hobbes | hobbes | einstein | einstein | bethe | bethe | oppenheimer | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | scientific revolution | victorian | victorian | philosophy | philosophy | science in cultural context | science in cultural context | imperialism | imperialism | natural history | natural history | institutions | institutions | biomedical research | biomedical research | modern physics | modern physics | post-war physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | scientific advancement | evolution | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.002-2 Foundations of Western Culture II: Renaissance to Modernity (MIT) 21L.002-2 Foundations of Western Culture II: Renaissance to Modernity (MIT)

Description

This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the growth of ideas about the nature of mankind's ethical and political life in the West since the renaissance. It will deal with the change in perspective imposed by scientific ideas, the general loss of a supernatural or religious perspective upon human events, and the effects for good or ill of the increasing authority of an intelligence uninformed by religion as a guide to life. The readings are roughly complementary to the readings in 21L001, and classroom discussion will stress appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the cultural heritage of the modern world. This subject offers a broad survey of texts (both literary and philosophical) drawn from the Western tradition and selected to trace the growth of ideas about the nature of mankind's ethical and political life in the West since the renaissance. It will deal with the change in perspective imposed by scientific ideas, the general loss of a supernatural or religious perspective upon human events, and the effects for good or ill of the increasing authority of an intelligence uninformed by religion as a guide to life. The readings are roughly complementary to the readings in 21L001, and classroom discussion will stress appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the cultural heritage of the modern world.

Subjects

literature | literature | culture | culture | philosophy | philosophy | ethics | ethics | theory | theory | society | society | politics | politics | religion | religion | science | science | west | west | machiavelli | machiavelli | more | more | swift | swift | hobbes | hobbes | shakespeare | shakespeare | rousseau | rousseau | wordsworth | wordsworth | kant | kant | austen | austen | nietzsche | nietzsche | balzac | balzac | shaw | shaw

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT) 17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville. This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville.

Subjects

political theory | political theory | social order | social order | history | history | justice | justice | democracy | democracy | state | state | philosophy | philosophy | plato | plato | aristotle | aristotle | machiavelli | machiavelli | hobbes | hobbes | locke | locke | rousseau | rousseau | marx | marx | de tocqueville | de tocqueville | individual | individual | political science | political science | political philosophy | political philosophy | politics | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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2.2 Thomas Hobbes: The Monster of Malmesbury

Description

Part 2.2. A brief introduction to Thomas Hobbes, 'The Monster of Malmsbury', his views on a mechanistic universe, his strong ideas on determinism and his pessimistic view of human nature: 'The life of man is solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short'. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

causation | philosophy | civil war | leviathan | hobbes | materialism | causation | philosophy | civil war | leviathan | hobbes | materialism

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This seminar explores recent historiographical approaches within the history of science. Students will read a wide variety of studies covering topics from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries, from the physical sciences to natural history and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on: deciphering different theoretical approaches; the pros and cons of different research questions, subjects, and sources of evidence; and what makes for good and interesting history of science.

Subjects

history | science | darwin | galileo | goethe | mesmer | boyle | hobbes | einstein | bethe | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | victorian | philosophy | science in cultural context | imperialism | natural history | institutions | biomedical research | modern physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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General Philosophy

Description

A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise the 8-week General Philosophy course and were delivered in late 2009.

Subjects

simple-podcasting | tpi3 | philosophy | millican | slides | powerpoint | checked1 | identity | locke | hume | mind | body | waismann | parfit | reid | memory | ancestral relations | sorites argument | leibniz | free will | determinism | sentimentalism | freedom | moral responsibility | libertarianism | necessity | causal | freedom determinism | choice | hobbes | compatibalism | ethics | frankfurt | perception | realism | idealism | phenomenalism | austin | strawson | berkeley | knowledge | boyle | ayer | peception | dualism | descartes | scepticism | skepticism | truth | ryle | meditations | induction | experience | reason | reichenbach | mellor | primary qualities | secondary qualities | ideas | epistemology | belief | putnam | gettier | moore | infinite regress | logic | external world | kant | immanuel kant | history | david hume | malebranche | god | causation | empiricism | rationalism | human understanding | treatise | government | corpuscularian | corpuscles | mathematics | atoms | science | newton | gravity | physics | civil war | leviathan | materialism | aristotle | renaissance | astronomy | society | religion | christianity | galileo | plato | stoics | epicureans | middle ages | aquinas | ontology | he - historical and philosophical studies | v500 | v380 | v511 | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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2.2 Thomas Hobbes: The Monster of Malmesbury

Description

Part 2.2. A brief introduction to Thomas Hobbes, 'The Monster of Malmsbury', his views on a mechanistic universe, his strong ideas on determinism and his pessimistic view of human nature: 'The life of man is solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short'.

Subjects

hobbes | civil war | leviathan | causation | philosophy | materialism | v500 | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.1 Free Will, Determinism and Choice

Description

Part 7.1. Explores the problem of free will and the ideas of moral responsibility, determinism and choice; the need for a concept of freedom to allow free choice, the problems associated with this and asking whether we really have freedom of choice.

Subjects

philosophy | free will | freedom | determinism | hume | hobbes | frankfurt | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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7.2 Different Concepts of Freedom

Description

Part 7.2. Looks at Hobbes' and Hume's views of free will and the three concepts of freedom, and considers the idea of moral responsibility as dependent on free will.

Subjects

philosophy | free will | freedom determinism | choice | hobbes | compatibalism | ethics | libertarianism | hume | moral responsibility | ukoer | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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STS.310 History of Science (MIT)

Description

This course offers an introduction to the history and historiography of science from ancient Greece to the present. It is designed to serve as an introduction for those who have no prior background in the field and to deepen the knowledge of those who already do. We will consider how the history of science has responded to its encounters with philosophy, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Our readings and discussions will focus on determining what makes particular works effective, understanding major contemporary trends and debates in the history of science, and establishing resources for further research.

Subjects

history | science | darwin | galileo | goethe | mesmer | boyle | hobbes | einstein | bethe | oppenheimer | scientific revolution | victorian | philosophy | science in cultural context | imperialism | natural history | institutions | biomedical research | modern physics | post-war physics | scientific advancement | evolution

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville.

Subjects

political theory | social order | history | justice | democracy | state | philosophy | plato | aristotle | machiavelli | hobbes | locke | rousseau | marx | de tocqueville | individual | political science | political philosophy | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.03 Introduction to Political Thought (MIT)

Description

This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and the questions they raise about the design of the political and social order. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader conversation about human goods and needs, justice, democracy, and the proper relationship of the individual to the state. One aim will be to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various regimes and philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own. Thinkers include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville.

Subjects

political theory | social order | history | justice | democracy | state | philosophy | plato | aristotle | machiavelli | hobbes | locke | rousseau | marx | de tocqueville | individual | political science | political philosophy | politics

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.450 Literature and Ethical Values (MIT)

Description

The aim of this subject is to acquaint the student with some important works of systematic ethical philosophy and to bring to bear the viewpoint of those works on the study of classic works of literature. This subject will trace the history of ethical speculation in systematic philosophy by identifying four major positions: two from the ancient world and the two most important traditions of ethical philosophy since the renaissance. The two ancient positions will be represented by Plato and Aristotle, the two modern positions by Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. We will try to understand these four positions as engaged in a rivalry with one another, and we will also engage with the philosophy of Thomas Hobbes, which offers a bridge between ancient and modern conceptions and provides

Subjects

ethics | values | literature | morality | justice | virtue | literary theory | responsibility | politics | plato | aristotle | machiavelli | hobbes | sophocles | euripides | shapkespeare | swift | ibsen | shaw | dostoyevsky | conrad | bible

License

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General Philosophy

Description

A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise the 8-week General Philosophy course and were delivered in late 2009.

Subjects

simple-podcasting | tpi3 | philosophy | identity | locke | hume | mind | body | waismann | parfit | checked1 | reid | memory | ancestral relations | sorites argument | leibniz | millican | slides | powerpoint | free will | determinism | sentimentalism | freedom | moral responsibility | libertarianism | necessity | causal | freedom determinism | choice | hobbes | compatibalism | ethics | frankfurt | perception | realism | idealism | phenomenalism | austin | strawson | berkeley | knowledge | boyle | ayer | peception | dualism | descartes | scepticism | skepticism | truth | meditations | induction | experience | reason | reichenbach | mellor | primary qualities | secondary qualities | ideas | epistemology | belief | putnam | gettier | moore | infinite regress | ryle | kant | immanuel kant | history | david hume | 1 | malebranche | god | causation | empiricism | rationalism | human understanding | treatise | government | corpuscularian | corpuscles | mathematics | atoms | science | newton | gravity | physics | civil war | leviathan | materialism | aristotle | renaissance | astronomy | society | religion | christianity | galileo | plato | stoics | epicureans | middle ages | aquinas | ontology | logic | external world | vertical scepticism | horizontal scepticism | he - historical and philosophical studies | v500 | v380 | v511 | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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