Searching for humanism : 25 results found | RSS Feed for this search

1

21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT) 21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form. This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form.

Subjects

Western culture | Western culture | foundations | foundations | modernism | modernism | texts | texts | literary | literary | philosophical | philosophical | sociological | sociological | secular humanism | secular humanism | human events | human events | individual | individual | social | social | communal purpose | communal purpose | common | common | cultural | cultural | possession | possession | ancient | ancient | modern world | modern world | discussion | discussion | action | action | characters | characters | voice | voice | form | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT) 21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact. This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | renaissance | revolution | revolution | Europe | Europe | Italy | Italy | French Revolution | French Revolution | theology | theology | magic | magic | science | science | England | England | censorship | censorship | Rene Descartes | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Copernicus | Constantine | Constantine | printing | printing | rare books | rare books | paper-making | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | The Paraclesis | free will | free will | Luther | Luther | German Peasants War | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | radical reform movements | religion | religion | Menocchio | Menocchio | skepticism | skepticism | the occult | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | astrology | Cardano | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Newtonianism | Principia | Principia | The Encyclopedie | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | Diderot | d'Alembert | d'Alembert | metric system | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses-21H.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT) 21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature appreciation | literature analysis | literature analysis | political theory | political theory | oratory | oratory | autobiography | autobiography | poetry | poetry | science fiction | science fiction | war | war | Renaissance | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Cort?s | Sahag?n | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Voltaire | Blake | Blake | Williams | Williams | Civil War | Civil War | abolition | abolition | Stowe | Stowe | Whitman | Whitman | Lincoln | Lincoln | Lowell | Lowell | Walcott | Walcott | Ondaatje | Ondaatje | O.S. Card | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

http://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Cultural and Literary Expression in the English Renaissance

Description

At the outset of the 16th century, Europeans tended to dismiss English literature as inferior to continental literary traditions; the educated Englishman was obliged to travel to the continent and speak in other languages in order to “culture” himself. By the end of the Renaissance, however, some of the greatest works in the English language—from Shakespeare’s dramas to Thomas More’s Utopia—had been written. In this course, the student will read and examine these works, situating them within their socio-historical and literary contexts, while attempting to determine how the art of English language and letters came into its own during this dynamic period. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (English

Subjects

renaissance | humanism | utopianism | literacy | reformation | religion | elizabethan england | prose | polemical | more | lyly | euphuism | foxe | protestantism | raleigh | poetry | sonnet | metaphysical | lyrical | theater | masque | marlowe | shakespeare | related subjects | R000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature analysis | political theory | oratory | autobiography | poetry | science fiction | war | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Blake | Williams | Civil War | abolition | Stowe | Whitman | Lincoln | Lowell | Walcott | Ondaatje | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-alltraditionalchinesecourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Early Globalizations: East Meets West (1200s-1600s)

Description

This course will introduce the student to the history of the world’s major civilizations from medieval times to the early modern era. The student will learn about the pivotal political, economic, and social changes that took place in Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Europe during this period. By the end of the course, the student will understand how many different civilizations evolved from isolated societies into expansive, interconnected empires capable of exerting global influence. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (History 221)

Subjects

globalization | byzantine | orthodox christianity | middle ages | europe | americas | aztecs | incas | china | golden age | mongol empire | pastoral-nomadic | economy | trade | exchange | renaissance | humanism | reformation | scientific revolution | new spain | ottoman empire | safavids | mughals | slave trade | diaspora | ming china | japan | buddhism | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture: The Making of the Modern World (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice and form.

Subjects

Western culture | foundations | modernism | texts | literary | philosophical | sociological | secular humanism | human events | individual | social | communal purpose | common | cultural | possession | ancient | modern world | discussion | action | characters | voice | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

History of Europe, 1000 to 1800

Description

This course will introduce the student to the history of Europe from the medieval period to the Age of Revolutions in the eighteenth century. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place in Europe during this 800-year period including the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, European expansion overseas, and the French Revolution. By the end of the course, the student will understand how Europe had transformed from a fragmented and volatile network of medieval polities into a series of independent nation-states by 1800. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (History 201)

Subjects

middle ages | medieval | culture | religion | renaissance | humanism | new world | reformation | martin luther | religious wars | absolutism | constitutionalism | europe | scientific | enlightenment | agricultural | atlantic economy | revolution | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Medieval Europe

Description

This course will introduce the student to the history of the European Middle Ages and Renaissance. The student will learn about the major political, economic, and social changes that took place between the fourth century and 1500. By the end of the course, the student will understand how Europe transformed from a collection of barbarian kingdoms into a continent with a sophisticated cultural and economic life that would later come to dominate the globe. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (History 302)

Subjects

history | medieval | europe | roman empire | byzantium | roman church | latin west | crusades | middle ages | renaissance | christianity | science | technology | culture | literature | theater | society | humanism | philosophical studies | V000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Natural Philosophy into Science: from the fall of the Roman Empire to the 17th Century

Description

Authors:  Emeritus Professor David Wolfe by David Wolfe, Emeritus Professor, University of New Mexico, visiting lecturer, Physics Department, University of Cape Town Clicked 29 times. Last clicked 10/20/2014 - 09:54. Teaching & Learning Context:  For anyone interested in learning more about the origins of modern science.

Subjects

Centre for Higher Education Development | Centre for Open Learning | Audio | Audio Lectures | English | Post-secondary | Abelard | Aristotle | Buridan | David Wolfe | Duns Scotus | humanism | Natural Philosophy | Oresme | Plato | Plotinus | Renaissance | Roman Empire | scholasticism | Science | Summer School | Swineshead

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/za/

Site sourced from

http://opencontent.uct.ac.za/recent-posts/feed.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Humanizem in renesansa - križanka Humanism and Renaissance - crosswords

Description

Križanka sestavljena iz besed povezanih s humanizmom in renesanso. Crossword puzzle build of terms regarding the humanism and renaissance.

Subjects

zgodovina | history | humanizem | humanism | renesansa | renaissance | križanka | crossword

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/

Site sourced from

http://atlas.fri.uni-lj.si/oai/index.php?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc&set=uciteljska

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Humanizem in renesansa - Slovenci - križanka Humanism and Renaissance in Slovenia - crosswords

Description

Križanka sestavljena iz besed povezanih s humanizmom in renesanso na Slovenskem. Crossword puzzle build of terms regarding the humanism and renaissance in Slovenia.

Subjects

zgodovina | history | humanizem | humanism | renesansa | renaissance | trubar | slovenija | slovenia | križanka | crossword

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/

Site sourced from

http://atlas.fri.uni-lj.si/oai/index.php?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc&set=uciteljska

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002 Foundations of Western Culture II (MIT)

Description

Complementary to 21L.001. A broad survey of texts - literary, philosophical, and sociological - studied to trace the growth of secular humanism, the loss of a supernatural perspective upon human events, and changing conceptions of individual, social, and communal purpose. Stresses appreciation and analysis of texts that came to represent the common cultural possession of our time. Enrollment limited. HASS-D, CI. Readings this semester ranging from political theory and oratory to autobiography, poetry, and science fiction reflect on war, motives for war, reconciliation and memory. The readings are largely organized around three historical moments: the Renaissance and first contacts between Europe and America (Machiavelli, Cortés, Sahagún); the European age of revolutions (Volt

Subjects

secular humanism | literature appreciation | literature analysis | political theory | oratory | autobiography | poetry | science fiction | war | Renaissance | Machiavelli | Cort?s | Sahag?n | European age of revolutions | Voltaire | Blake | Williams | Civil War | abolition | Stowe | Whitman | Lincoln | Lowell | Walcott | Ondaatje | O.S. Card

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Humanizem in renesansa - anagram Humanism and renaissance - anagram

Description

Anagrami iz besed povezanih z humanizmom in renesanso. Anagrams of terms related to the humanism and renaissance.

Subjects

filozofija | philosophy | zgodovina | history | humanizem | humanism | renesansa | renaissance | primož trubar | anagram

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/

Site sourced from

http://atlas.fri.uni-lj.si/oai/index.php?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc&set=uciteljska

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Humanisti in književniki - osmica Humanists and writers - word search puzzle

Description

Iskanje besed povezanih z vzponom meščanstva v renesansi v črkovni mreži. Finding the words related to the first citizens in renaissance in the character mesh.

Subjects

zgodovina | history | humanizem | humanism | trubar | književnost | literature | renesansa | renaissance | osmica | word search puzzle

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/

Site sourced from

http://atlas.fri.uni-lj.si/oai/index.php?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc&set=uciteljska

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Humanisti in književniki - anagram Humanists and writers - anagram

Description

Anagrami iz besed povezanih z književniki v renesanci. Anagrams related to the writers in renaissance.

Subjects

zgodovina | history | humanizem | humanism | renesansa | renaissance | književnost | literature | anagram

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/si/

Site sourced from

http://atlas.fri.uni-lj.si/oai/index.php?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc&set=uciteljska

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21L.002-3 Foundations of Western Culture II: Modernism (MIT)

Description

This course comprises a broad survey of texts, literary and philosophical, which trace the development of the modern world from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Intrinsic to this development is the growth of individualism in a world no longer understood to be at the center of the universe. The texts chosen for study exemplify the emergence of a new humanism, at once troubled and dynamic in comparison to the old. The leading theme of this course is thus the question of the difference between the ancient and the modern world. Students who have taken Foundations of Western Culture I will obviously have an advantage in dealing with this question. Classroom discussion approaches this question mainly through consideration of action and characters, voice an

Subjects

Western culture | foundations | modernism | texts | literary | philosophical | sociological | secular humanism | human events | individual | social | communal purpose | common | cultural | possession | ancient | modern world | discussion | action | characters | voice | form

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allarchivedcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Psychotherapy

Description

Psychotherapy refers to the practices clinical psychologists use to treat mental disorders. While “therapy” can denote any intervention undertaken with the goal of healing someone (including medicinal treatments for physical problems), psychotherapy is specific in that it uses certain cognitive, behavioral, and emotional regulation techniques. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Psychology 404)

Subjects

psychotherapy | psychoanalysis | behaviorism | freud | erikson | determinism | existentialism | humanism | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Theories of Personality

Description

Personality psychology is the study of the development of personality, the effects of personality on important outcomes, and maladaptive personality characteristics. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Psychology 405)

Subjects

personality | consciousness | perception | adaptation | psychodynamic | humanism | evolution | genetics | Social studies | L000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

The Italian Proto-Renaissance To Mannerism

Description

The student will focus on becoming “literate” in the art of the Italian Renaissance, on identifying the effects that the Renaissance had on the arts of Italy, and discovering the ways in which specific historical developments impacted those arts from the end of the thirteenth century to the end of the sixteenth century. This free course may be completed online at any time. See course site for detailed overview and learning outcomes. (Art History 206)

Subjects

renaissance | italy | black death | art | gothic | transformations | florence | architecture | sculpture | siena | humanism | painting | venice | reformation | da vinci | michelangelo | raphael | venetian masters | mannerism | design | W000

License

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Theories of Literacy Learning

Description

In this lesson, we will discuss key theories of learning that impact on current pedagogy and evaluate key theories in light of your own practice. We will also identify how you draw on learning theories when you engage in subject pedagogy. Finally, we will show how you can demonstrate awareness of theoretical perspectives when planning and teaching literacy lessons.

Subjects

humanism | cognitive strategies | zone of proximal development | implications for literacy teaching and learning | behaviourism | cognitivism | social interaction | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

Theory in Practice in Your Area

Description

In this lesson, we will examine theories and principles of learning and communication in relation to teaching and learning in a specialist area. We will also reflect on your own attitude to integrating theory and practice and consider the selection and use of teaching and learning strategies to achieve inclusive learning. Finally, we will examine using theory to apply up-to-date knowledge, skills and understanding within your own specialist area.

Subjects

modelling approach | communities of practice | humanism | blooms taxonomy | EDUCATION / TRAINING / TEACHING | G

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Site sourced from

http://dspace.jorum.ac.uk/oai/request?verb=ListRecords&metadataPrefix=oai_dc

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata

21H.141 Renaissance To Revolution: Europe, 1300-1800 (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to major political, social, cultural and intellectual changes in Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance in Italy around 1300 to the outbreak of the French Revolution at the end of the 1700s. It focuses on the porous boundaries between categories of theology, magic and science, as well as print. It examines how developments in these areas altered European political institutions, social structures, and cultural practices. It also studies men and women, nobles and commoners, as well as Europeans and some non-Europeans with whom they came into contact.

Subjects

renaissance | revolution | Europe | Italy | French Revolution | theology | magic | science | England | censorship | Rene Descartes | Italian humanism | Copernicus | Constantine | printing | rare books | paper-making | Erasmus of Rotterdam | The Paraclesis | free will | Luther | German Peasants War | The Cheese and the Worms | Protestant revolution | Catholic renewal | radical reform movements | religion | Menocchio | skepticism | the occult | Michel de Montaigne | astrology | Cardano | Cartesian Method | Discourse on Method | English Civil War | interregnum | Putney debates | Wallington's World | The Mad Hatter | Isaac Newton | Newtonianism | Principia | The Encyclopedie | Diderot | d'Alembert | metric system

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

Site sourced from

https://ocw.mit.edu/rss/all/mit-allcourses.xml

Attribution

Click to get HTML | Click to get attribution | Click to get URL

All metadata

See all metadata