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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT) STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists, This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | computers | history | history | digital | digital | scientific instrument | scientific instrument | applied science | applied science | meteorology | meteorology | nuclear physics | nuclear physics | logic | logic | mathematics | mathematics | cognitive psychology | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | biochemistry | aerospace | aerospace | medicine | medicine | supercomputing | supercomputing | distributed computing | distributed computing | linguistics | linguistics | humanities | humanities | hypertext | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT) 21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium. This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Theory | Practice | Practice | Non-linear | Non-linear | Interactive | Interactive | Narrative | Narrative | Film | Film | Writing | Writing | Games | Games | Web | Web | HTML | HTML | Multilinear | Multilinear | Story | Story | creative writing | creative writing | computers | computers | book-based narratives | book-based narratives | structure | structure | digression | digression | multiple points of view | multiple points of view | storyline | storyline | hypertexts | hypertexts | adventure games | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | eliza | modeling | modeling | computer-based narratives | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.708 Technologies of Humanism (MIT) 21L.708 Technologies of Humanism (MIT)

Description

This course explores the properties of non-sequential, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define ‘non-sequentiality/multi-linearity’, ‘interactivity’, ‘narrative&# This course explores the properties of non-sequential, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define ‘non-sequentiality/multi-linearity’, ‘interactivity’, ‘narrative&#

Subjects

interactive media | interactive media | digital media | digital media | narrative | narrative | non-linear narrative | non-linear narrative | experimental fiction | experimental fiction | point of view | point of view | hypertext | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT) 21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT)

Description

What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory. What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory.

Subjects

popular reading | popular reading | highbrow culture | highbrow culture | lowbrow culture | lowbrow culture | gender | gender | taste | taste | theory and practice of reading | theory and practice of reading | fanfiction | fanfiction | fandom | fandom | Oprah | Oprah | comics | comics | hypertext | hypertext | mass-market romance fiction | mass-market romance fiction | mega-chain bookstore | mega-chain bookstore | reader response theory | reader response theory | Harry Potter | Harry Potter | sociology and history of reading | sociology and history of reading | resistance | resistance | rare books | rare books | fads | fads | social engineering | social engineering | bestseller | bestseller

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.772 Digital Poetry (MIT) 21W.772 Digital Poetry (MIT)

Description

This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis. This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis.

Subjects

Digital | Digital | poetry | poetry | theory | theory | practice | practice | new media | new media | workshop | workshop | soundscapes | soundscapes | hypertext poetry | hypertext poetry | animation | animation | code poems | code poems | interactive games | interactive games | location-based poems | location-based poems | handheld devices | handheld devices | digital video | digital video | wikis | wikis | essays | essays | experimental art | experimental art

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT) 21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium. This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Theory | Practice | Practice | Non-linear | Non-linear | Interactive | Interactive | Narrative | Narrative | Film | Film | Writing | Writing | Games | Games | Web | Web | HTML | HTML | Multilinear | Multilinear | Story | Story | creative writing | creative writing | computers | computers | book-based narratives | book-based narratives | structure | structure | digression | digression | multiple points of view | multiple points of view | storyline | storyline | hypertexts | hypertexts | adventure games | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | eliza | modeling | modeling | computer-based narratives | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21W.765 | 21L.489 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.708 Technologies of Humanism (MIT) 21L.708 Technologies of Humanism (MIT)

Description

This course explores the properties of non-sequential, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define ‘non-sequentiality/multi-linearity’, ‘interactivity’, ‘narrative&# This course explores the properties of non-sequential, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define ‘non-sequentiality/multi-linearity’, ‘interactivity’, ‘narrative&#

Subjects

interactive media | interactive media | digital media | digital media | narrative | narrative | non-linear narrative | non-linear narrative | experimental fiction | experimental fiction | point of view | point of view | hypertext | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Practice | Non-linear | Interactive | Narrative | Film | Writing | Games | Web | HTML | Multilinear | Story | creative writing | computers | book-based narratives | structure | digression | multiple points of view | storyline | hypertexts | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | modeling | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Attribution

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21W.772 Digital Poetry (MIT)

Description

This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis.

Subjects

Digital | poetry | theory | practice | new media | workshop | soundscapes | hypertext poetry | animation | code poems | interactive games | location-based poems | handheld devices | digital video | wikis | essays | experimental art

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.708 Technologies of Humanism (MIT)

Description

This course explores the properties of non-sequential, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define ‘non-sequentiality/multi-linearity’, ‘interactivity’, ‘narrative&#

Subjects

interactive media | digital media | narrative | non-linear narrative | experimental fiction | point of view | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Attribution

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Practice | Non-linear | Interactive | Narrative | Film | Writing | Games | Web | HTML | Multilinear | Story | creative writing | computers | book-based narratives | structure | digression | multiple points of view | storyline | hypertexts | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | modeling | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21L.715 Media in Cultural Context: Popular Readerships (MIT)

Description

What is the history of popular reading in the Western world? How does widespread access to print relate to distinctions between highbrow and lowbrow culture, between good taste and bad judgment, and between men and women readers? This course will introduce students to the broad history of popular reading and to controversies about taste and gender that have characterized its development. Our grounding in historical material will help make sense of our main focus: recent developments in the theory and practice of reading, including fan-fiction, Oprah's book club, comics, hypertext, mass-market romance fiction, mega-chain bookstores, and reader response theory.

Subjects

popular reading | highbrow culture | lowbrow culture | gender | taste | theory and practice of reading | fanfiction | fandom | Oprah | comics | hypertext | mass-market romance fiction | mega-chain bookstore | reader response theory | Harry Potter | sociology and history of reading | resistance | rare books | fads | social engineering | bestseller

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Attribution

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21L.708 Technologies of Humanism (MIT)

Description

This course explores the properties of non-sequential, multi-linear, and interactive forms of narratives as they have evolved from print to digital media. Works covered in this course range from the Talmud, classics of non-linear novels, experimental literature, early sound and film experiments to recent multi-linear and interactive films and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and of storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, properties of digital media and hypertext. Questions that will be addressed in this course include: How can we define ‘non-sequentiality/multi-linearity’, ‘interactivity’, ‘narrative&#

Subjects

interactive media | digital media | narrative | non-linear narrative | experimental fiction | point of view | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.765J Theory and Practice of Non-linear and Interactive Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class covers a range of topics including hypertext, interactive cinema, games, installation art, and soundscapes. It examines the potential for dynamic narrative in traditional media like novels and films and as well as in computer-based stories and games. The course focuses on the creation of electronic stories and games using simple authoring systems and multimedia software tools. Students present and constructively critique one another's work in progress in a workshop setting aimed at expanding the representational powers of a new creative medium.

Subjects

Theory | Practice | Non-linear | Interactive | Narrative | Film | Writing | Games | Web | HTML | Multilinear | Story | creative writing | computers | book-based narratives | structure | digression | multiple points of view | storyline | hypertexts | adventure games | artificial intelligence programs | eliza | modeling | computer-based narratives | 21W.765 | 21L.489

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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STS.035 The History of Computing (MIT)

Description

This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants’ memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists,

Subjects

computers | history | digital | scientific instrument | applied science | meteorology | nuclear physics | logic | mathematics | cognitive psychology | biochemistry | aerospace | medicine | supercomputing | distributed computing | linguistics | humanities | hypertext

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Web Design and Objects - Introduction

Description

This reading material forms part of the "Introduction" topic in the Web Design and Objects module.

Subjects

ukoer | hypertext application types reading material | web design and objects introduction | web design and objects | web | web design | web object | web objects | web design and objects introduction reading material | web design and objects reading material | web reading material | web design reading material | web object reading material | web objects reading material | g530 | g530 reading material | Computer science | I100

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21W.772 Digital Poetry (MIT)

Description

This class investigates theory and practice of digital or new media poetry with emphasis on workshop review of digital poetry created by students. Each week students examine published examples of digital poetry in a variety of forms including but not limited to soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, location-based poems using handheld devices, digital video and wikis.

Subjects

Digital | poetry | theory | practice | new media | workshop | soundscapes | hypertext poetry | animation | code poems | interactive games | location-based poems | handheld devices | digital video | wikis | essays | experimental art

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Readme file for Web Design and Objects

Description

This readme file contains details of links to all the Web Design and Objects module's material held on Jorum and information about the module as well.

Subjects

ukoer | data oriented dynamic design methods article | data oriented dynamic design methods reading material | data oriented dynamic design methods | data oriented dynamic web design method article | data oriented dynamic web design method reading material | data oriented dynamic web design method | design method article | design method lecture | design method reading material | design method | design methods article | design methods lecture | design methods reading material | design methods | dynamic design method article | dynamic design method lecture | dynamic design methods reading material | dynamic design methods | hypermedia design methods reading material | hypermedia design reading material | hypermedia systems reading material | hypertext application types reading material | live projects reading material | modelling framework reading material | object oriented dynamic design methods and consensus | object oriented dynamic web design method lecture | object oriented dynamic web design method reading material | object oriented dynamic web design method | process/event oriented dynamic design methods lecture | process/event oriented dynamic design methods | robustness diagrams reading material | simple web method website | static web method reading material | static web method task guide | static web method website | static web method | static web methods reading material | static web methods task guide | static web methods website | static web methods | structured detail website | structured overview lecture | structured techniques external website | structured techniques lecture | structured techniques reading material | structured techniques | swm analysis website | swm design detail | systems analysis and design practical | systems analysis and design reading material | systems analysis and design task guide | systems analysis and design website | systems analysis and design | systems analysis reading material | systems analysis task guide | uml lecture | uml reading material | web article | web design and objects article | web design and objects external website | web design and objects introduction lecture | web design and objects introduction reading material | web design and objects introduction task guide | web design and objects introduction website | web design and objects introduction | web design and objects lecture | web design and objects reading material | web design and objects task guide | web design and objects website | web design and objects | web design article | web design external website | web design lecture | web design practical | web design reading material | web design task guide | web design website | web design | web engineering reading material | web external website | web lecture | web method reading material | web method task guide | web method website | web method | web methods reading material | web methods task guide | web methods website | web methods | web object article | web object external website | web object lecture | web object practical | web object reading material | web object task guide | web object website | web object | web objects article | web objects external website | web objects lecture | web objects practical | web objects reading material | web objects task guide | web objects website | web objects | web practical | web reading material | web task guide | web website | web | webml lecture | webml reading material | webml website | webratio website | g530 article | g530 external website | g530 lecture | g530 practical | g530 reading material | g530 task guide | g530 website | g530 | web design and objects practical | web modeling language external website | web modeling language lecture | web modeling language reading material | web modeling language | web modelling language external website | web modelling language lecture | web modelling language reading material | web modelling language | webml external website | webml | Computer science | I100

License

Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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