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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | culture studies | culture studies | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | gender identity | gender identity | religious identity | religious identity | racial identity | racial identity | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social movements | social movements | identity politics | identity politics | indigenous rights movements | indigenous rights movements | transnational institutions | transnational institutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Techno-identity: Who we are and how we perceive ourselves and others (MIT) MAS.963 Techno-identity: Who we are and how we perceive ourselves and others (MIT)

Description

Subjects

human identity | human identity | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | religious beliefs | religious beliefs | social mores | social mores | philosophical theories | philosophical theories | mediated identity | mediated identity | sensing identity | sensing identity | privacy | privacy | Post-human identity | Post-human identity | what does it mean to be human | what does it mean to be human

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT) 17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT)

Description

This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling. This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling.

Subjects

measurement | measurement | ethnic diversity | ethnic diversity | fluidity | fluidity | identity | identity | social identity theory | social identity theory | mechanisms of group comparison | mechanisms of group comparison | memory | memory | death | death | stigma | stigma | prejudice | prejudice | contact hypothesis | contact hypothesis | cascade models | cascade models | identity simulation | identity simulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | ethnicity | national identity | nationalism | history | nation-state | conflict | social movement | indigenous rights | politics | globalization | migration | transnational institution | gender | religion | race | ideology | culture studies | cross-cultural | ethnic identity | gender identity | religious identity | racial identity | ethnic conflict | social movements | identity politics | indigenous rights movements | transnational institutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT) 21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course is a workshop for advanced students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or other's, in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate. This course is a workshop for advanced students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or other's, in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate.

Subjects

workshop | workshop | advanced students | advanced students | writing | writing | essays | essays | nonfiction | nonfiction | prose | prose | identities | identities | gender | gender | race | race | class | class | nationality | nationality | sexuality | sexuality | identity | identity | expository | expository | exploratory | exploratory | investigative | investigative | persuasive | persuasive | lyrical | lyrical | incantatory | incantatory | determinants of identity | determinants of identity | intersect | intersect | compete | compete | cooperate | cooperate | SP.576 | SP.576

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT) 11.949 Cities in Conflict: Theory and Practice (MIT)

Description

This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons This course's aims are two-fold: to offer students the theoretical and practical tools to understand how and why cities become torn by ethnic, religious, racial, nationalist, and/or other forms of identity that end up leading to conflict, violence, inequality, and social injustice; and to use this knowledge and insight in the search for solutions As preparation, students will be required to become familiar with social and political theories of the city and the nation and their relationship to each other. They also will focus on the ways that racial, ethnic, religious, nationalist or other identities grow and manifest themselves in cities or other territorial levels of determination (including the regional or transnational). In the search for remedies, students will be encouraged to cons

Subjects

why cities become torn | why cities become torn | ethnic | ethnic | religious | religious | racial | racial | nationalist | nationalist | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | forms of identity that end up leading to conflict | violence | violence | inequality | inequality | social injustice | social injustice | solutions | solutions | social and political theories of the city and the nation | social and political theories of the city and the nation | territorial levels of determination | territorial levels of determination | regional or transnational | regional or transnational | policymaking | policymaking | democratic participation | democratic participation | citizenship | citizenship | spatial | spatial | infrastructural | infrastructural | technological interventions | technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | spatial | infrastructural | and technological interventions | democracy | democracy | democratic | democratic | territory | territory | territorial | territorial | participation | participation | policy | policy | theoretical | theoretical | practical | practical | identity | identity | conflict | conflict | social | social | political | political | theories | theories | regional | regional | transnational | transnational | levels of determination | levels of determination | institutional | institutional | technological | technological | interventions | interventions | city | city | difference | difference | diversity | diversity | equality | equality | class | class | cities | cities | nations | nations | legal | legal | jurisdiction | jurisdiction | peace | peace | cosmopolitan | cosmopolitan

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity. In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21H.153 | 21G.069 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | Asian American feminisms | feminism | feminism | ethnic nationalism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | class and labor issues | domestic violence | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603J | SP.603 | SP.603

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | life narrative | revision | writing | self | society | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | life narrative | revision | writing | self | society | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT) 21W.745 Advanced Essay Workshop (MIT)

Description

This course is a workshop for students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or others', in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate. This course is a workshop for students with some experience in writing essays, nonfiction prose. Our focus will be negotiating and representing identities grounded in gender, race, class, nationality, sexuality, and other categories of identity, either our own or others', in prose that is expository, exploratory, investigative, persuasive, lyrical, or incantatory. We will read nonfiction prose works by a wide array of writers who have used language to negotiate and represent aspects of identity and the ways the different determinants of identity intersect, compete, and cooperate.

Subjects

Workshop | Workshop | advanced students | advanced students | writing | writing | essays | essays | nonfiction | nonfiction | prose | prose | identities | identities | gender | gender | race | race | class | class | nationality | nationality | sexuality | sexuality | identity | identity | expository | expository | exploratory | exploratory | investigative | investigative | persuasive | persuasive | lyrical | lyrical | incantatory | incantatory | determinants of identity | determinants of identity | intersect | intersect | compete | compete | cooperate | cooperate

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-4 Writing and Experience (MIT) 21W.731-4 Writing and Experience (MIT)

Description

MIT students bring rich cultural backgrounds to their college experience. This course explores the splits, costs, confusions, insights, and opportunities of living in two traditions, perhaps without feeling completely at home in either. Course readings include accounts of growing up Asian-American, Hispanic, Native American, and South-East Asian-American, and of mixed race. The texts include selections from Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior, Kesaya E. Noda's "Growing Up Asian in America," Sandra Cisneros's Woman Hollering Creek, Gary Soto's "Like Mexicans," Sherman Alexie's The Toughest Indian in the World, Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies, the movies Smoke Signals and Mississippi Masala, Danzy Senna's Caucasia, and others. We will also use students MIT students bring rich cultural backgrounds to their college experience. This course explores the splits, costs, confusions, insights, and opportunities of living in two traditions, perhaps without feeling completely at home in either. Course readings include accounts of growing up Asian-American, Hispanic, Native American, and South-East Asian-American, and of mixed race. The texts include selections from Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior, Kesaya E. Noda's "Growing Up Asian in America," Sandra Cisneros's Woman Hollering Creek, Gary Soto's "Like Mexicans," Sherman Alexie's The Toughest Indian in the World, Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies, the movies Smoke Signals and Mississippi Masala, Danzy Senna's Caucasia, and others. We will also use students

Subjects

identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | ntercultural experience | ntercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Techno-identity: Who we are and how we perceive ourselves and others (MIT)

Description

The nature of human identity - how we think of ourselves, how we perceive others - is a mutable concept, changing with the rise and fall of religious beliefs, social mores, philosophical theories. Today, we live in a world in which science and technology are among the most powerful forces reshaping our culture - and thus our definitions and perceptions of identity. In this seminar, we will examine the impact of science and technology on identity. The instructor's course page may be viewed at http://smg.media.mit.edu/classes/IdentitySeminar/

Subjects

human identity | artificial intelligence | religious beliefs | social mores | philosophical theories | mediated identity | sensing identity | privacy | Post-human identity | what does it mean to be human

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | life narrative | revision | writing | self | society | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | life narrative | revision | writing | self | society | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT)

Description

This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling.

Subjects

measurement | ethnic diversity | fluidity | identity | social identity theory | mechanisms of group comparison | memory | death | stigma | prejudice | contact hypothesis | cascade models | identity simulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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The citizenship market: trading identities in East Africa and the Great Lakes

Description

Public Seminar Series, Michaelmas term 2012. Seminar by Dr Katy Long (London School of Economics and Political Science) recorded on 24 October 2012 at the Oxford Department of International Development, University of Oxford. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

citizenship | kampala | Africa | migration | Uganda | asylum | refugees | identity | citizenship | kampala | Africa | migration | Uganda | asylum | refugees | identity | 2012-10-24

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Description

This podcast was recorded at the Refugee Studies Centre's last Wednesday Public Seminar of Michaelmas Term 2011. This podcast was recorded at the Refugee Studies Centre on Wednesday 30 November 2011. The lecture was given by Dr Jelka Zorn, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

conflicts | Slovenia | documentation | integration | identity | conflicts | Slovenia | documentation | integration | identity

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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in the UK?

Description

Podcast on what migration means for 'White Working Class' in the UK, Ben Rogaly and Becky Taylor present their research findings. Politicians from a wide variety of political perspectives have invoked 'the white working class' in immigration debates, while evidence shows that many who fit this category are now out-performed on many indices of deprivation and educational attainment by ethnic minorities from migrant backgrounds. But what is the actual evidence for the impact of migration on "white working class" communities? What are the policy implications of the evidence? And how helpful are the terms of the debate in the first place? This briefing will be presented by Dr Ben Rogaly, Senior Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Sussex and a member of the Sussex Centre for Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

Subjects

migrants | human geography | migration | identity | politics | working class | class | ethnicity | migrants | human geography | migration | identity | politics | working class | class | ethnicity | 2011-04-01

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Who do you think you are? Managing Personhood in a Neurobiological Age

Description

Nikolas Rose (BIOS Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science) gives a keynote speech for the Neurosociety conference

Subjects

neuroscience | society | said business school | neurosociety | identity | neurobiology | 2010-12-07 | ukoer | neuroscience | society | said business school | neurosociety | identity | neurobiology | 2010-12-07

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21G.027J Visualizing Cultures (MIT) 21G.027J Visualizing Cultures (MIT)

Description

In this new course, students will study how images have been used to shape the identity of peoples and cultures. A prototype digital project looking at American and Japanese graphics depicting the opening of Japan to the outside world in the 1850s will be used as a case study to introduce the conceptual and practical issues involved in "visualizing cultures". The major course requirement will be creation and presentation of a project involving visualized cultures. In this new course, students will study how images have been used to shape the identity of peoples and cultures. A prototype digital project looking at American and Japanese graphics depicting the opening of Japan to the outside world in the 1850s will be used as a case study to introduce the conceptual and practical issues involved in "visualizing cultures". The major course requirement will be creation and presentation of a project involving visualized cultures.

Subjects

cultural perception | cultural perception | imagery | imagery | cultural identity | cultural identity | 21F.027J | 21F.027J | 21F.027 | 21F.027 | 21H.917 | 21H.917

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights. An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | language | language | sexuality | sexuality | feminist analysis | feminist analysis

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT) 24.09 Minds and Machines (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation? This course is an introduction to many of the central issues in a branch of philosophy called philosophy of mind. Some of the questions we will discuss include the following. Can computers think? Is the mind an immaterial thing? Or is the mind the brain? Or does the mind stand to the brain as a computer program stands to the hardware? How can creatures like ourselves think thoughts that are "about" things? (For example, we can all think that Aristotle is a philosopher, and in that sense think "about" Aristotle, but what is the explanation of this quite remarkable ability?) Can I know whether your experiences and my experiences when we look at raspberries, fire trucks and stop lights are the same? Can consciousness be given a scientific explanation?

Subjects

Searle; AI | Searle; AI | dualism | dualism | behaviorism | behaviorism | identity theory | identity theory | functionalism | functionalism | intentionality | intentionality | externalism | externalism | self-knowledge | self-knowledge | knowledge argument | knowledge argument | chalmer | chalmer | panprotopsychism | panprotopsychism | mysterianism | mysterianism | conciousness | conciousness | rene descartes | rene descartes | mind | mind | brain | brain | causal theory | causal theory | pain | pain | relief | relief | meaning | meaning | individualism | individualism | qualia | qualia | mind-body problem | mind-body problem

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT) 17.418 Field Seminar: International Relations Theory (MIT)

Description

This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations. This seminar provides an overview of the field of international relations. Each week, a different approach to explaining international relations will be examined. By surveying major concepts and theories in the field, the seminar will also assist graduate students in preparing for the comprehensive examination and further study in the department's more specialized offerings in international relations.

Subjects

international relations | international relations | security | security | anarchy | anarchy | power | power | identity | identity | domestic policy | domestic policy | war | war | conflict | conflict | military | military | peace | peace | cooperation | cooperation | compliance | compliance | democracy | democracy | politics | politics | unipolarity | unipolarity

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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