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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | culture studies | culture studies | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | gender identity | gender identity | religious identity | religious identity | racial identity | racial identity | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social movements | social movements | identity politics | identity politics | indigenous rights movements | indigenous rights movements | transnational institutions | transnational institutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | culture studies | culture studies | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | gender identity | gender identity | religious identity | religious identity | racial identity | racial identity | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social movements | social movements | identity politics | identity politics | indigenous rights movements | indigenous rights movements | transnational institutions | transnational institutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Techno-identity: Who we are and how we perceive ourselves and others (MIT) MAS.963 Techno-identity: Who we are and how we perceive ourselves and others (MIT)

Description

Subjects

human identity | human identity | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | religious beliefs | religious beliefs | social mores | social mores | philosophical theories | philosophical theories | mediated identity | mediated identity | sensing identity | sensing identity | privacy | privacy | Post-human identity | Post-human identity | what does it mean to be human | what does it mean to be human

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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MAS.963 Techno-identity: Who we are and how we perceive ourselves and others (MIT) MAS.963 Techno-identity: Who we are and how we perceive ourselves and others (MIT)

Description

Subjects

human identity | human identity | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | religious beliefs | religious beliefs | social mores | social mores | philosophical theories | philosophical theories | mediated identity | mediated identity | sensing identity | sensing identity | privacy | privacy | Post-human identity | Post-human identity | what does it mean to be human | what does it mean to be human

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT) 21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives. The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna | life narrative | life narrative | revision | revision | writing | writing | self | self | society | society | fiction | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT) 17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT)

Description

This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling. This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling.

Subjects

measurement | measurement | ethnic diversity | ethnic diversity | fluidity | fluidity | identity | identity | social identity theory | social identity theory | mechanisms of group comparison | mechanisms of group comparison | memory | memory | death | death | stigma | stigma | prejudice | prejudice | contact hypothesis | contact hypothesis | cascade models | cascade models | identity simulation | identity simulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT) 17.506 Ethnic Politics II (MIT)

Description

This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling. This course is designed mainly for political science graduate students conducting or considering conducting research on identity politics. While 17.504 Ethnic Politics I is designed as a primarily theoretical course, Ethnic Politics II switches the focus to methods. It aims to familiarize the student with the current conventional approaches as well as major challenges to them. The course discusses definition and measurement issues as well as briefly addressing survey techniques and modeling.

Subjects

measurement | measurement | ethnic diversity | ethnic diversity | fluidity | fluidity | identity | identity | social identity theory | social identity theory | mechanisms of group comparison | mechanisms of group comparison | memory | memory | death | death | stigma | stigma | prejudice | prejudice | contact hypothesis | contact hypothesis | cascade models | cascade models | identity simulation | identity simulation

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-1 Writing and Experience: Exploring Self in Society (MIT)

Description

The reading and writing for this course will focus on what it means to construct a sense of self and a life narrative in relation to the larger social world of family and friends, education, media, work, and community. Readings will include nonfiction and fiction works by authors such as Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Andre Dubus, Anne Frank, Tim O'Brien, Flannery O'Connor, George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Amy Tan, Tobias Wolff, and Alice Walker. Students will explore the craft of storytelling and the multiple ways in which one can employ the tools of fiction in crafting creative nonfiction and fiction narratives.

Subjects

identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | identity | culture | tradition | ethnicity | cultural identity | intercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | life narrative | revision | writing | self | society | fiction

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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21W.731-4 Writing and Experience (MIT) 21W.731-4 Writing and Experience (MIT)

Description

MIT students bring rich cultural backgrounds to their college experience. This course explores the splits, costs, confusions, insights, and opportunities of living in two traditions, perhaps without feeling completely at home in either. Course readings include accounts of growing up Asian-American, Hispanic, Native American, and South-East Asian-American, and of mixed race. The texts include selections from Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior, Kesaya E. Noda's "Growing Up Asian in America," Sandra Cisneros's Woman Hollering Creek, Gary Soto's "Like Mexicans," Sherman Alexie's The Toughest Indian in the World, Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies, the movies Smoke Signals and Mississippi Masala, Danzy Senna's Caucasia, and others. We will also use students MIT students bring rich cultural backgrounds to their college experience. This course explores the splits, costs, confusions, insights, and opportunities of living in two traditions, perhaps without feeling completely at home in either. Course readings include accounts of growing up Asian-American, Hispanic, Native American, and South-East Asian-American, and of mixed race. The texts include selections from Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior, Kesaya E. Noda's "Growing Up Asian in America," Sandra Cisneros's Woman Hollering Creek, Gary Soto's "Like Mexicans," Sherman Alexie's The Toughest Indian in the World, Jhumpa Lahiri's Interpreter of Maladies, the movies Smoke Signals and Mississippi Masala, Danzy Senna's Caucasia, and others. We will also use students

Subjects

identity | identity | culture | culture | tradition | tradition | ethnicity | ethnicity | cultural identity | cultural identity | ntercultural experience | ntercultural experience | Maxine Hong Kingston | Maxine Hong Kingston | Kesaya Noda | Kesaya Noda | Gary Soto | Gary Soto | Sherman Alexie | Sherman Alexie | Jhumpa Lahiri | Jhumpa Lahiri | Danzy Senna | Danzy Senna

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see https://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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8.1 Introduction to Personal Identity 8.1 Introduction to Personal Identity

Description

Part 8.1. Introduces the concept of personal identity, what is it to be a person, whether someone is the same person over time and Leibniz's law of sameness. Part 8.1. Introduces the concept of personal identity, what is it to be a person, whether someone is the same person over time and Leibniz's law of sameness.

Subjects

leibniz | leibniz | hume | hume | philosophy | philosophy | identity | identity | memory | memory | leibniz | hume | philosophy | identity | memory | leibniz | hume | philosophy | identity | memory

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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8.2 John Locke on Personal Identity 8.2 John Locke on Personal Identity

Description

Part 8.2. Looks at John Locke's view of personal identity; how consciousness and 'personal history' distinguish personal identity and the idea of memory as crucial for personal identity. Part 8.2. Looks at John Locke's view of personal identity; how consciousness and 'personal history' distinguish personal identity and the idea of memory as crucial for personal identity.

Subjects

sorites argument | sorites argument | memory | memory | philosophy | philosophy | identity | identity | locke | locke | sorites argument | memory | philosophy | identity | locke | sorites argument | memory | philosophy | identity | locke

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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s View of Personal Identity s View of Personal Identity

Description

Part 8.3. Criticisms of Locke's view of personal identity; if personal identity is dependent on memory then how does forgetting personal history and the concept of false memory change Locke's view of personal identity. Part 8.3. Criticisms of Locke's view of personal identity; if personal identity is dependent on memory then how does forgetting personal history and the concept of false memory change Locke's view of personal identity.

Subjects

locke | locke | philosophy | philosophy | reid | reid | memory | memory | ancestral relations | ancestral relations | identity | identity | hume | hume | locke | philosophy | reid | memory | ancestral relations | identity | hume | locke | philosophy | reid | memory | ancestral relations | identity | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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8.4 Persons, Humans and Brains 8.4 Persons, Humans and Brains

Description

Part 8.4. The final part of this series. Explores the distinction between mind and body and whether this makes a difference to the idea of personal identity. Part 8.4. The final part of this series. Explores the distinction between mind and body and whether this makes a difference to the idea of personal identity.

Subjects

body | body | parfit | parfit | locke | locke | philosophy | philosophy | mind | mind | waismann | waismann | identity | identity | hume | hume | body | parfit | locke | philosophy | mind | waismann | identity | hume | body | parfit | locke | philosophy | mind | waismann | identity | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT) 21H.153J Race and Gender in Asian America (MIT)

Description

In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity. In this seminar we will examine various issues related to the intersection of race and gender in Asian America, starting with the nineteenth century, but focusing on contemporary issues. Topics to be covered may include racial and gender discourse, the stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media, Asian American masculinity, Asian American feminisms and their relation to mainstream American feminism, the debate between feminism and ethnic nationalism, gay and lesbian identity, class and labor issues, domestic violence, interracial dating and marriage, and multiracial identity.

Subjects

21H.153 | 21H.153 | 21G.069 | 21G.069 | WGS.237 | WGS.237 | racial and gender discourse | racial and gender discourse | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | stereotyping of Asian American women and men in the media | Asian American masculinity | Asian American masculinity | Asian American feminisms | Asian American feminisms | feminism | feminism | ethnic nationalism | ethnic nationalism | gay and lesbian identity | gay and lesbian identity | class and labor issues | class and labor issues | domestic violence | domestic violence | interracial dating and marriage | interracial dating and marriage | multiracial identity | multiracial identity | SP.603J | SP.603J | SP.603 | SP.603

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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Session 3: The Role of Identity in International and Regional Relations Session 3: The Role of Identity in International and Regional Relations

Description

The launch of the tenth edition of St Antony?s International Review includes panels and presentations on the theme of the resurgence of identity politics. St Antony's International Review (STAIR) is Oxford's journal of global affairs, a peer-reviewed, academic journal established in 2005 by graduate members of St Antony's College at the University of Oxford. Featured Panels and Presentations: Session 1: Nationalism, Ethnic Conflict and New Political Identities Dr. Jonathan Leader Maynard, Dr. Aurelien Mondon, and Professor Alexander Betts. Introduced by Katharine Brooks. Session 2: The Devoted Actor: Pancultural Foundations of Intractable Conflict (in co-operation with the Centre for International Studies) Dr. Scott Atran (Director of Research, ARTIS and CIS Research Associate). I The launch of the tenth edition of St Antony?s International Review includes panels and presentations on the theme of the resurgence of identity politics. St Antony's International Review (STAIR) is Oxford's journal of global affairs, a peer-reviewed, academic journal established in 2005 by graduate members of St Antony's College at the University of Oxford. Featured Panels and Presentations: Session 1: Nationalism, Ethnic Conflict and New Political Identities Dr. Jonathan Leader Maynard, Dr. Aurelien Mondon, and Professor Alexander Betts. Introduced by Katharine Brooks. Session 2: The Devoted Actor: Pancultural Foundations of Intractable Conflict (in co-operation with the Centre for International Studies) Dr. Scott Atran (Director of Research, ARTIS and CIS Research Associate). I

Subjects

identity | identity | international relations | international relations | regional | regional | identity | international relations | regional | 2015-02-27 | identity | international relations | regional | 2015-02-27

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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Session 1: Nationalism, Ethnic Conflict and New Political Identities Session 1: Nationalism, Ethnic Conflict and New Political Identities

Description

The launch of the tenth edition of St Antony?s International Review includes panels and presentations on the theme of the resurgence of identity politics. St Antony's International Review (STAIR) is Oxford's journal of global affairs, a peer-reviewed, academic journal established in 2005 by graduate members of St Antony's College at the University of Oxford. Featured Panels and Presentations: Session 1: Nationalism, Ethnic Conflict and New Political Identities Dr. Jonathan Leader Maynard, Dr. Aurelien Mondon, and Professor Alexander Betts. Introduced by Katharine Brooks. Session 2: The Devoted Actor: Pancultural Foundations of Intractable Conflict (in co-operation with the Centre for International Studies) Dr. Scott Atran (Director of Research, ARTIS and CIS Research Associate). I The launch of the tenth edition of St Antony?s International Review includes panels and presentations on the theme of the resurgence of identity politics. St Antony's International Review (STAIR) is Oxford's journal of global affairs, a peer-reviewed, academic journal established in 2005 by graduate members of St Antony's College at the University of Oxford. Featured Panels and Presentations: Session 1: Nationalism, Ethnic Conflict and New Political Identities Dr. Jonathan Leader Maynard, Dr. Aurelien Mondon, and Professor Alexander Betts. Introduced by Katharine Brooks. Session 2: The Devoted Actor: Pancultural Foundations of Intractable Conflict (in co-operation with the Centre for International Studies) Dr. Scott Atran (Director of Research, ARTIS and CIS Research Associate). I

Subjects

nationalism | nationalism | identity | identity | conflict | conflict | nationalism | identity | conflict | 2015-02-27 | nationalism | identity | conflict | 2015-02-27

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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8.1 Introduction to Personal Identity 8.1 Introduction to Personal Identity

Description

Part 8.1. Introduces the concept of personal identity, what is it to be a person, whether someone is the same person over time and Leibniz's law of sameness. Part 8.1. Introduces the concept of personal identity, what is it to be a person, whether someone is the same person over time and Leibniz's law of sameness.

Subjects

leibniz | leibniz | hume | hume | philosophy | philosophy | identity | identity | memory | memory | leibniz | hume | philosophy | identity | memory | leibniz | hume | philosophy | identity | memory

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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8.2 John Locke on Personal Identity 8.2 John Locke on Personal Identity

Description

Part 8.2. Looks at John Locke's view of personal identity; how consciousness and 'personal history' distinguish personal identity and the idea of memory as crucial for personal identity. Part 8.2. Looks at John Locke's view of personal identity; how consciousness and 'personal history' distinguish personal identity and the idea of memory as crucial for personal identity.

Subjects

sorites argument | sorites argument | memory | memory | philosophy | philosophy | identity | identity | locke | locke | sorites argument | memory | philosophy | identity | locke | sorites argument | memory | philosophy | identity | locke

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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s View of Personal Identity s View of Personal Identity

Description

Part 8.3. Criticisms of Locke's view of personal identity; if personal identity is dependent on memory then how does forgetting personal history and the concept of false memory change Locke's view of personal identity. Part 8.3. Criticisms of Locke's view of personal identity; if personal identity is dependent on memory then how does forgetting personal history and the concept of false memory change Locke's view of personal identity.

Subjects

locke | locke | philosophy | philosophy | reid | reid | memory | memory | ancestral relations | ancestral relations | identity | identity | hume | hume | locke | philosophy | reid | memory | ancestral relations | identity | hume | locke | philosophy | reid | memory | ancestral relations | identity | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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8.4 Persons, Humans and Brains 8.4 Persons, Humans and Brains

Description

Part 8.4. The final part of this series. Explores the distinction between mind and body and whether this makes a difference to the idea of personal identity. Part 8.4. The final part of this series. Explores the distinction between mind and body and whether this makes a difference to the idea of personal identity.

Subjects

body | body | parfit | parfit | locke | locke | philosophy | philosophy | mind | mind | waismann | waismann | identity | identity | hume | hume | body | parfit | locke | philosophy | mind | waismann | identity | hume | body | parfit | locke | philosophy | mind | waismann | identity | hume

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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The persistence of identity in the digital age: Living in social networks on and offline The persistence of identity in the digital age: Living in social networks on and offline

Description

Social networks are now culturally bound to online software such as Facebook and Twitter, with a trend in personal persistent content. Bernie Hogan will review new empirical research on social networks and conclude with advice on future online policy. Social networks are now culturally bound to online software such as Facebook and Twitter, with a trend in personal persistent content. Bernie Hogan will review new empirical research on social networks and conclude with advice on future online policy.

Subjects

twitter | twitter | facebook | facebook | social networks | social networks | networks | networks | identity | identity | alumni weekend | alumni weekend | twitter | facebook | social networks | networks | identity | alumni weekend | 2011-09-17 | twitter | facebook | social networks | networks | identity | alumni weekend | 2011-09-17

License

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

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