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17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics.  The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the ins Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics.  The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the ins

Subjects

liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | 17.100 | 17.100 | 14.781 | 14.781 | 15.678 | 15.678

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Social problems: Who makes them? Social problems: Who makes them?

Description

Anti-social behaviour, homelessness, drugs, mental illness: all problems in today's society. But what makes a problem social? This free course, Social problems: Who makes them?, will help you to discover how these issues are identified, defined, given meaning and acted upon. You will also look at the conflicts within social science in this area. First published on Mon, 07 Mar 2016 as Social problems: Who makes them?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016 Anti-social behaviour, homelessness, drugs, mental illness: all problems in today's society. But what makes a problem social? This free course, Social problems: Who makes them?, will help you to discover how these issues are identified, defined, given meaning and acted upon. You will also look at the conflicts within social science in this area. First published on Mon, 07 Mar 2016 as Social problems: Who makes them?. To find out more visit The Open University's Openlearn website. Creative-Commons 2016

Subjects

Sociology | Sociology | poverty | poverty | ideology | ideology | D218_1 | D218_1

License

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3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT) 3.094 Materials in Human Experience (MIT)

Description

This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091. This course examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples are: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; sounds and colors of powerful metals in Mesoamerica; cloth and fiber technologies in the Inca empire. It also explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. This course complements 3.091.

Subjects

ancient and contemporary societies | ancient and contemporary societies | materials of nature | materials of nature | objects of material culture | objects of material culture | glass | glass | ancient Egypt and Rome | ancient Egypt and Rome | metals | metals | Mesoamerica | Mesoamerica | cloth and fiber technologies | cloth and fiber technologies | the Inca empire | the Inca empire | ideological and aesthetic criteria | ideological and aesthetic criteria | materials development | materials development | ancient glass | ancient glass | ancient Andean metallurgy | ancient Andean metallurgy | rubber processing | rubber processing | materials processing | materials processing | materials engineering | materials engineering | pre-modern technology | pre-modern technology | ceramics | ceramics | fibers | fibers | ideology | ideology | values | values | anthropology | anthropology | archaeology | archaeology | history | history | culture | culture

License

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STS.S28 Godzilla and the Bullet Train: Technology and Culture in Modern Japan (MIT) STS.S28 Godzilla and the Bullet Train: Technology and Culture in Modern Japan (MIT)

Description

This course explores how and why Japan, a late-comer to modernization, emerged as an industrial power and the world's second-richest nation, notwithstanding its recent difficulties. We are particularly concerned with the historical development of technology in Japan especially after 1945, giving particular attention to the interplays between business, ideology, technology, and culture. We will discuss key historical phenomena that symbolize modern Japan as a technological power in the world; specific examples to be discussed in class include kamikaze aircraft, the Shinkansen high-speed bullet train, Godzilla, and anime. This course explores how and why Japan, a late-comer to modernization, emerged as an industrial power and the world's second-richest nation, notwithstanding its recent difficulties. We are particularly concerned with the historical development of technology in Japan especially after 1945, giving particular attention to the interplays between business, ideology, technology, and culture. We will discuss key historical phenomena that symbolize modern Japan as a technological power in the world; specific examples to be discussed in class include kamikaze aircraft, the Shinkansen high-speed bullet train, Godzilla, and anime.

Subjects

modern japan | modern japan | transformation of japan | transformation of japan | nationalism | nationalism | japanese culture | japanese culture | postwar japan | postwar japan | anime | anime | japanese media | japanese media | japanese history | japanese history | modernization | modernization | cultural ideology | cultural ideology | Godzilla | Godzilla | technology transfer | technology transfer | shinkansen | shinkansen

License

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology

License

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17.951 Special Graduate Topic in Political Science: Public Opinion (MIT) 17.951 Special Graduate Topic in Political Science: Public Opinion (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the vast literature devoted to public opinion. In the next 12 weeks, we will survey the major theoretical approaches and empirical research in the field of political behavior (though we will only tangentially discuss political  participation and voting). For the most part we will focus on American public opinion, though some of the work we will read is comparative in nature. This course provides an introduction to the vast literature devoted to public opinion. In the next 12 weeks, we will survey the major theoretical approaches and empirical research in the field of political behavior (though we will only tangentially discuss political  participation and voting). For the most part we will focus on American public opinion, though some of the work we will read is comparative in nature.

Subjects

political science | political science | public opinion | public opinion | voting | voting | elections | elections | empirical research | empirical research | analysis | analysis | ideology | ideology | american | american | society | society | media | media | public policy | public policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | democracy | democracy | theory | theory

License

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CMS.405 Media and Methods: Seeing and Expression (MIT) CMS.405 Media and Methods: Seeing and Expression (MIT)

Description

In this course students create digital visual images and analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives with an emphasis on art and design, examining visual experience in broad terms, and from the perspectives of both creators and viewers. The course addresses key topics such as: image making as a cognitive and perceptual practice, the production of visual significance and meaning, and the role of technology in creating and understanding digitally produced images. Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using technologies such as the Adobe Creative Suite and/or similar applications. In this course students create digital visual images and analyze designs from historical and theoretical perspectives with an emphasis on art and design, examining visual experience in broad terms, and from the perspectives of both creators and viewers. The course addresses key topics such as: image making as a cognitive and perceptual practice, the production of visual significance and meaning, and the role of technology in creating and understanding digitally produced images. Students will be given design problems growing out of their reading and present solutions using technologies such as the Adobe Creative Suite and/or similar applications.

Subjects

media | media | design | design | visual design | visual design | visual literacy | visual literacy | comics | comics | semiotics | semiotics | sequential art | sequential art | signs | signs | shapes | shapes | patterns | patterns | augury | augury | cognition | cognition | creativity | creativity | psychology | psychology | image | image | imago | imago | mimesis | mimesis | representation | representation | icon | icon | iconology | iconology | iconoclasm | iconoclasm | iconogasm | iconogasm | gestalt | gestalt | ideology | ideology | text | text | shahrazad | shahrazad | myth | myth | mythos | mythos | mythology | mythology | typography | typography | type | type | information design | information design | color | color | space | space | visual culture | visual culture | digital media | digital media

License

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17.408 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT) 17.408 Chinese Foreign Policy (MIT)

Description

This course explores the leading theoretical and methodological approaches to studying China's interaction with the international system since 1949. Readings include books and articles that integrate the study of China's foreign policy with the field of international relations. This course explores the leading theoretical and methodological approaches to studying China's interaction with the international system since 1949. Readings include books and articles that integrate the study of China's foreign policy with the field of international relations.

Subjects

Chinese foreign policy | Chinese foreign policy | international relations | international relations | Korean War | Korean War | ideology | ideology | Yalu | Yalu | Mao | Mao | Nehru | Nehru | bipolarity | bipolarity | nuclear weapons | nuclear weapons | territorial sovereignty | territorial sovereignty | strategic weapons | strategic weapons | nationalism | nationalism | security | security | economic policies | economic policies | World Trade Organization | World Trade Organization | economic integration | economic integration | social state | social state | multilateralism | multilateralism | regional security | regional security

License

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights. An introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, and consider the ways in which gendered, linguistic, religious, and ethno-racial identity components interact. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, as well as ethnic conflict, globalization, identity politics, and human rights.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | language | language | sexuality | sexuality | feminist analysis | feminist analysis

License

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British public policy British public policy

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. The aim of this module is to analyse and explain the changing nature of policy-making in contemporary Britain, with particular emphasis on the period since 1979. Specifically, the module examines the impact of new forms of 'governance' on the policy-making process and the changing roles and responsibilities of the British state. Taking the alleged shift from an era of 'government' to one of 'governance', and thence to an era of 'joined up government' as its central theme, the module interrogates key controversies in contemporary British political science. Examples here include the impact of 'governance', of New Right ideology, of Europeanization and of global This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught Autumn Semester 2010/2011. The aim of this module is to analyse and explain the changing nature of policy-making in contemporary Britain, with particular emphasis on the period since 1979. Specifically, the module examines the impact of new forms of 'governance' on the policy-making process and the changing roles and responsibilities of the British state. Taking the alleged shift from an era of 'government' to one of 'governance', and thence to an era of 'joined up government' as its central theme, the module interrogates key controversies in contemporary British political science. Examples here include the impact of 'governance', of New Right ideology, of Europeanization and of global

Subjects

UNow | UNow | M13045 | M13045 | ukoer | ukoer | policy-making in contemporary Britain | policy-making in contemporary Britain | new forms of governance | new forms of governance | policy-making process | policy-making process | the British state | the British state | government | government | joined up government | joined up government | contemporary British political science | contemporary British political science | New Right ideology | New Right ideology

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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21L.012 Forms of Western Narrative (MIT) 21L.012 Forms of Western Narrative (MIT)

Description

This class will investigate the ways in which the formal aspects of Western storytelling in various media have shaped both fantasies and perceptions, making certain understandings of experience possible through the selection, arrangement, and processing of narrative material. Surveying the field chronologically across the major narrative genres and sub-genres from Homeric epic through the novel and across media to include live performance, film, and video games, we will be examining the ways in which new ideologies and psychological insights become available through the development of various narrative techniques and new technologies. Emphasis will be placed on the generic conventions of story-telling as well as on literary and cultural issues, the role of media and modes of transmission, This class will investigate the ways in which the formal aspects of Western storytelling in various media have shaped both fantasies and perceptions, making certain understandings of experience possible through the selection, arrangement, and processing of narrative material. Surveying the field chronologically across the major narrative genres and sub-genres from Homeric epic through the novel and across media to include live performance, film, and video games, we will be examining the ways in which new ideologies and psychological insights become available through the development of various narrative techniques and new technologies. Emphasis will be placed on the generic conventions of story-telling as well as on literary and cultural issues, the role of media and modes of transmission,

Subjects

literature | literature | western | western | narrative | narrative | storytelling | storytelling | media | media | epic | epic | novel | novel | performance | performance | film | film | video games | video games | ideology | ideology | psychology | psychology | technology | technology | culture | culture | literary theory | literary theory | anthropology | anthropology | communication | communication | Homer | Homer | Sophocles | Sophocles | Herodotus | Herodotus | Christian evangelists | Christian evangelists | Marie de France | Marie de France | Cervantes | Cervantes | La Clos | La Clos | Poe | Poe | Lang | Lang | Cocteau | Cocteau | Disney | Disney | Pixar | Pixar | Maxis | Maxis | Electronic Arts | Electronic Arts | Propp | Propp | Bakhtin | Bakhtin | Girard | Girard | Freud | Freud | Marx | Marx

License

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17.100J Political Economy I (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | theories | theories | liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | political economy | political economy | political liberalism | political liberalism | individualism | individualism | neo-classical economics | neo-classical economics | Marxism | Marxism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism

License

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11.002J Making Public Policy (MIT) 11.002J Making Public Policy (MIT)

Description

This course aims to get students thinking about politics and policy as a part of their everyday life. We treat politics as a struggle among competing advocates trying to persuade others to see the world as they do, working within a context that is structured primarily by institutions and cultural ideas. We’ll begin by developing a policymaking framework, understanding ideology, and taking a whirlwind tour of the American political system. Then, we’ll examine six policy issues in depth: health care, gun control, the federal budget, immigration reform, same-sex marriage, and energy and climate change. This course aims to get students thinking about politics and policy as a part of their everyday life. We treat politics as a struggle among competing advocates trying to persuade others to see the world as they do, working within a context that is structured primarily by institutions and cultural ideas. We’ll begin by developing a policymaking framework, understanding ideology, and taking a whirlwind tour of the American political system. Then, we’ll examine six policy issues in depth: health care, gun control, the federal budget, immigration reform, same-sex marriage, and energy and climate change.

Subjects

public policy | public policy | politics | politics | policy | policy | advocate | advocate | institutions | institutions | government | government | ideology | ideology | health care | health care | gun control | gun control | federal budget | federal budget | immigration | immigration | same-sex marriage | same-sex marriage | energy | energy | climate change | climate change | reform | reform | capitalism | capitalism | freedom | freedom | agendas | agendas | congress | congress | interest groups | interest groups | public opinion | public opinion | obamacare | obamacare | ACA | ACA | recession | recession | deficit | deficit | debt | debt | fiscal cliff | fiscal cliff | sequester | sequester | executive action | executive action | social policy | social policy | amendment | amendment | federalism | federalism | judicial review | judicial review | renewable energy | renewable energy

License

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21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT) 21G.040 A Passage to India: Introduction to Modern Indian Culture and Society (MIT)

Description

This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through discussions centered on India's history, politics and religion. The focus is on issues such as ethnic tension and terrorism, poverty and inequality, caste conflict, the "missing women," and the effects of globalization on popular and folk cultures. Particular emphasis is on the IT revolution, outsourcing, the "new global India," and the enormous regional and sub-cultural differences. This course introduces students to Indian Culture through films, short-stories, novels, essays, and newspaper articles. The course examines some major social and political controversies of contemporary India through discussions centered on India's history, politics and religion. The focus is on issues such as ethnic tension and terrorism, poverty and inequality, caste conflict, the "missing women," and the effects of globalization on popular and folk cultures. Particular emphasis is on the IT revolution, outsourcing, the "new global India," and the enormous regional and sub-cultural differences.

Subjects

Bipan Chandra | Bipan Chandra | Ismat Chugtai | Ismat Chugtai | Mahasweta Devi | Mahasweta Devi | Nayantara Sahgal | Nayantara Sahgal | Amartya Sen | Amartya Sen | directors | directors | film | film | writers | writers | leading parallel film makers | leading parallel film makers | Shyam Benegal | Shyam Benegal | Shekhar Kapoor | Shekhar Kapoor | Govind Nihalani | Govind Nihalani | Satyajit Ray | Satyajit Ray | IT revolution | IT revolution | documentaries | documentaries | Indian culture | Indian culture | globalization | globalization | Indian cities | Indian cities | political events | political events | social events | social events | negotiating the "system" in India | negotiating the "system" in India | ideology of a "new Indian" | ideology of a "new Indian"

License

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17.100J Political Economy I (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based.

Subjects

Political science | Political science | theories | theories | liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | political economy | political economy | political liberalism | political liberalism | individualism | individualism | neo-classical economics | neo-classical economics | Marxism | Marxism | neo-institutionalism | neo-institutionalism

License

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21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT) 21H.001 How to Stage a Revolution (MIT)

Description

21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers. 21H.001, a HASS-D, CI course, explores fundamental questions about the causes and nature of revolutions. How do people overthrow their rulers? How do they establish new governments? Do radical upheavals require bloodshed, violence, or even terror? How have revolutionaries attempted to establish their ideals and realize their goals? We will look at a set of major political transformations throughout the world and across centuries to understand the meaning of revolution and evaluate its impact. By the end of the course, students will be able to offer reasons why some revolutions succeed and others fail. Materials for the course include the writings of revolutionaries, declarations and constitutions, music, films, art, memoirs, and newspapers.

Subjects

insurgents | insurgents | war | war | freedom fighters | freedom fighters | independence | independence | self-determination | self-determination | emancipation | emancipation | revolution | revolution | Mao | Mao | Lenin | Lenin | Reagan | Reagan | L'Ouverture | L'Ouverture | reactionary | reactionary | imperialism | imperialism | human rights | human rights | democracy | democracy | populism | populism | Communism | Communism | equality | equality | nationalism | nationalism | resistance | resistance | ideology | ideology | subversion | subversion | underground | underground | suppression | suppression

License

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21G.053 Understanding Contemporary French Politics (MIT) 21G.053 Understanding Contemporary French Politics (MIT)

Description

This course examines the changes in contemporary French society through the study of political debates, reforms and institutions since 1958, and analyzes the deep influence of politics on cultural and social life, despite a decline in political participation. Public controversies and political cleavages, from the Algerian war to postcolonial issues, from the birth of the European Union to the recent financial crisis, and from the moral "revolution" of the seventies to the recognition of new families are revisited. This course is taught in English. This course examines the changes in contemporary French society through the study of political debates, reforms and institutions since 1958, and analyzes the deep influence of politics on cultural and social life, despite a decline in political participation. Public controversies and political cleavages, from the Algerian war to postcolonial issues, from the birth of the European Union to the recent financial crisis, and from the moral "revolution" of the seventies to the recognition of new families are revisited. This course is taught in English.

Subjects

French | French | France | France | French society culture | French society culture | politics | politics | presidency | presidency | ideology | ideology | Fifth Republic | Fifth Republic | political system | political system | public speaking | public speaking | political debate | political debate

License

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17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT) 17.522 Politics and Religion (MIT)

Description

This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor. This graduate reading seminar explores the role of religious groups, institutions, and ideas in politics using social science theories. It is open to advanced undergraduate students with permission of the instructor.

Subjects

social science | social science | institutions | institutions | ideology | ideology | policymaking | policymaking | state-building | state-building | democracy | democracy | regime change | regime change | conflict | conflict | war | war | political process | political process | nationalism | nationalism | terrorism | terrorism | social movment | social movment | modernization | modernization | secularization | secularization | church-state | church-state

License

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CMS.701 Current Debates in Media (MIT) CMS.701 Current Debates in Media (MIT)

Description

Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This class addresses important, current debates in media with in-depth discussion of popular perceptions and policy implications. Students will engage in the critical study of the economic, political, social, and cultural significance of media, and learn to identify, analyze, and understand the complex relations among media texts, policies, institutions, industries, and infrastructures. This class offers the opportunity to discuss, in stimulating and challenging ways, topics such as ideology, propaganda, net neutrality, big data, digital hacktivism, digital rebellion, media violence, gamification, collective intelligence, participatory culture, intellectual property, artificial intelligence, etc., from historical, transcultural, and multi Includes audio/video content: AV selected lectures. This class addresses important, current debates in media with in-depth discussion of popular perceptions and policy implications. Students will engage in the critical study of the economic, political, social, and cultural significance of media, and learn to identify, analyze, and understand the complex relations among media texts, policies, institutions, industries, and infrastructures. This class offers the opportunity to discuss, in stimulating and challenging ways, topics such as ideology, propaganda, net neutrality, big data, digital hacktivism, digital rebellion, media violence, gamification, collective intelligence, participatory culture, intellectual property, artificial intelligence, etc., from historical, transcultural, and multi

Subjects

mass media | mass media | economics | economics | politics | politics | ideology | ideology | propaganda | propaganda | net neutrality | net neutrality | big data | big data | digital hacktivism | digital hacktivism | digital rebellion | digital rebellion | media violence | media violence | gamification | gamification | collective intelligence | collective intelligence | participatory culture | participatory culture | intellectual property | intellectual property | artificial intelligence | artificial intelligence | gender studies | gender studies | gaming | gaming | video games | video games

License

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Mobilization (MIT) Mobilization (MIT)

Description

This seminar is a space for collaborative inquiry into the relationships between social movements and the media. We'll review these relationships through the lens of social movement theory, and function as a workshop to develop student projects. Seminar participants will work together to explore frameworks, methods, and tools for understanding networked social movements in the digital media ecology. We will engage with social movement studies as a body of theoretical and empirical work, and learn about key concepts including: resource mobilization; political process; framing; New Social Movements; collective identity; tactical media; protest cycles; movement structure; and more. We'll explore methods of social movement investigation, examine new data sources and tools for movement analys This seminar is a space for collaborative inquiry into the relationships between social movements and the media. We'll review these relationships through the lens of social movement theory, and function as a workshop to develop student projects. Seminar participants will work together to explore frameworks, methods, and tools for understanding networked social movements in the digital media ecology. We will engage with social movement studies as a body of theoretical and empirical work, and learn about key concepts including: resource mobilization; political process; framing; New Social Movements; collective identity; tactical media; protest cycles; movement structure; and more. We'll explore methods of social movement investigation, examine new data sources and tools for movement analys

Subjects

movement | movement | occupy | occupy | society | society | network | network | protest | protest | power | power | politic | politic | crowd abortion | crowd abortion | capitalism | capitalism | democracy | democracy | justice | justice | ideology | ideology | framing | framing | identity | identity | transmedia revolt | transmedia revolt | globalism | globalism | feminism | feminism | twilight | twilight | civil | civil | change | change | lulz | lulz | anonymous | anonymous | remix | remix | disobedience | disobedience | buffy | buffy | cotinelpro | cotinelpro | internet | internet | tumblr | tumblr | resistance | resistance | tyrrany | tyrrany

License

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Hitler and the Third Reich Hitler and the Third Reich

Description

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010. The Third Reich is one of the most notorious, discussed and horrific periods of our age and although it is also very well researched, still raises many questions: How could a man like Hitler gain so much power? How could a whole nation ‘fall’ for the Nazi ideology? Why the Jews ..? In this module we will aim to deal with these and other questions about the time between 1933 and 1945. We will discuss and research its politics as well as its society and culture, raise questions about the function of propaganda, press and youth and women organisations as well as the role of films, art and literature. Some theoretical writings on fascist ideology will provide us with relev This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file. As taught in Spring Semester 2010. The Third Reich is one of the most notorious, discussed and horrific periods of our age and although it is also very well researched, still raises many questions: How could a man like Hitler gain so much power? How could a whole nation ‘fall’ for the Nazi ideology? Why the Jews ..? In this module we will aim to deal with these and other questions about the time between 1933 and 1945. We will discuss and research its politics as well as its society and culture, raise questions about the function of propaganda, press and youth and women organisations as well as the role of films, art and literature. Some theoretical writings on fascist ideology will provide us with relev

Subjects

UNow | UNow | third reich | third reich | Hitler | Hitler | Adolf Hitler | Adolf Hitler | nazi ideology | nazi ideology | function of propaganda | function of propaganda | ukoer | ukoer

License

Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA) Except for third party materials (materials owned by someone other than The University of Nottingham) and where otherwise indicated, the copyright in the content provided in this resource is owned by The University of Nottingham and licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike UK 2.0 Licence (BY-NC-SA)

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17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT) 17.960 Foundations of Political Science (MIT)

Description

This course continues from the fall semester. The course introduces students to the fundamental theories and methods of modern political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that have been influential in the field. This semester, the course focuses on American and comparative politics. This course continues from the fall semester. The course introduces students to the fundamental theories and methods of modern political science through the study of a small number of major books and articles that have been influential in the field. This semester, the course focuses on American and comparative politics.

Subjects

American | American | foundations | foundations | politics | politics | political science | political science | comparative politics | comparative politics | social division | social division | identity | identity | ideology | ideology | beliefs | beliefs | participation | participation | institutions | institutions | outcomes | outcomes | system | system

License

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21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT) 21A.226 Ethnic and National Identity (MIT)

Description

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict. This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural study of ethnic and national identity. We examine the concept of social identity, consider how gender, religious and racial identity components interact with ethnic and national ones. We explore the history of nationalism, including the emergence of the idea of the nation-state, and discuss the effects of globalization, migration, and transnational institutions. We also look at identity politics and ethnic conflict.

Subjects

anthropology | anthropology | ethnicity | ethnicity | national identity | national identity | nationalism | nationalism | history | history | nation-state | nation-state | conflict | conflict | social movement | social movement | indigenous rights | indigenous rights | politics | politics | globalization | globalization | migration | migration | transnational institution | transnational institution | gender | gender | religion | religion | race | race | ideology | ideology | culture studies | culture studies | cross-cultural | cross-cultural | ethnic identity | ethnic identity | gender identity | gender identity | religious identity | religious identity | racial identity | racial identity | ethnic conflict | ethnic conflict | social movements | social movements | identity politics | identity politics | indigenous rights movements | indigenous rights movements | transnational institutions | transnational institutions

License

Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative Commons License (Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike). For further information see http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/index.htm

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17.951 Special Graduate Topic in Political Science: Public Opinion (MIT) 17.951 Special Graduate Topic in Political Science: Public Opinion (MIT)

Description

This course provides an introduction to the vast literature devoted to public opinion. In the next 12 weeks, we will survey the major theoretical approaches and empirical research in the field of political behavior (though we will only tangentially discuss political  participation and voting). For the most part we will focus on American public opinion, though some of the work we will read is comparative in nature. This course provides an introduction to the vast literature devoted to public opinion. In the next 12 weeks, we will survey the major theoretical approaches and empirical research in the field of political behavior (though we will only tangentially discuss political  participation and voting). For the most part we will focus on American public opinion, though some of the work we will read is comparative in nature.

Subjects

political science | political science | public opinion | public opinion | voting | voting | elections | elections | empirical research | empirical research | analysis | analysis | ideology | ideology | american | american | society | society | media | media | public policy | public policy | foreign policy | foreign policy | democracy | democracy | theory | theory

License

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17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT) 17.100J Political Economy I: Theories of the State and the Economy (MIT)

Description

Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics. The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the instructors. Political Economy I explores the major social science paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy, and society. Through readings, lectures and discussion of original texts in political liberalism and individualism, neo-classical economics, Marxism, sociological and cultural theories, and neo-institutionalism, the seminar examines the fundamental assumptions on which our understanding of the social world and our research are based. All participants in the seminar are required to do the weekly readings before class meetings. The course also requires two 12-15 page essays on assigned topics. The seminar is open to graduate students in all departments and also to undergraduates with prior course work in economics or political science and with permission of the instructors.

Subjects

liberal | liberal | neoclassical | neoclassical | Marxist | Marxist | modern society | modern society | economic growth | economic growth | historical change | historical change | state | state | classes | classes | ideology | ideology | 17.100 | 17.100 | 14.781 | 14.781 | 15.678 | 15.678 | Political science | Political science | theories | theories

License

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